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September 10, 1993 - Image 12

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The Michigan Daily, 1993-09-10

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12 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, September 10, 1993

Campus theater groups
address tough issues

ALWAYS POLITICS IN ANN ARBOR

By SHELLEY MORRISON
DAILY STAFF REPORTER
Students with aflair for drama anda
desire to tackle some of today's tough-
estcampus issuesmay find the opportu-
nity to take center stage with a Univer-
sity audience next week.
The Residence Hall Repertoire The-
ater troupe - part of a nearly 10-year-
old University program to promote dis-
cussion of student concerns in residence
halls - is hosting auditions for perfor-
mances during the 1993-94 academic
year.
The 20-member cast, known as Res
Rep, writes and produces two or three
shows per year. Topics for last year's
performances ranged from sexuality and
discriminationtoschool and social pres-
sure.
Res Rep Director Amy Kullenberg
said the content of the scripts is deter-
mined by students in the troupe and is
based on what they believe to be the
most pressing campus concerns.
"Our goal is to be responsive to a
campus environment," Kullenberg said.
"Res Rep members get together and
talk about what the important issues are
for students. But script writing also
involves a lot of spontaneity and even
flow."
Talk to Us, a related campus theater
group formed afew years after Res Rep,
will also be holding auditions for its 10-
member company. Talk to Us players
promote discussion of the issues by
directly interacting with audience mem-

hers in a residence hall setting.
Audition workshops forboth troupes
will begin Monday and are open to any
students interested in theater, regardless
of experience.
Studentswillbeaskedtoactingroups
and individually, utilizing scripts and
improvization. The directors will look
for performers who are comfortable on
stage in roles that address controversial
issues.
'It's so casual, people
don't fool threatened.'
Randon Noble
- LSA junior
"We're not necessarily looking for
greatacting talent," said Ramona Brand
Piracha, director of Talk to Us. "We're
looking for people who have an interest
in the issues and are not afraid to ap-
proach (difficult) subjects."
LSA junior Randon Noble said her
involvement in both troupes in the past
two years has shown her that drama is
an effective way to reach out to stu-
dents.
"It's so casual, people don't feel
threatened," Noble said. "It's a subtle
but effective way to learn about com-
munication and human relations."
Auditions will take place this Mon-
day and Tuesday from7 to9 p.m.in the
Wedge Room in West Quad.

Students
can find
deals at
By JENNIFER TIANEN
DAILY STAFF REPORTER
Some students wonder where Ann
Arborite Shakey Jake purchases his in-
famous white shoes. Perhaps an elegant
shoe store on Main Street? Or through a
patronage of Briarwood Mall?
Fred Sanchez, a volunteer and mem-
ber of the Kiwanis Club of Downtown
Ann Arbor, claims Shakey-Jake buys
his shoes at the Kiwanis Activity Center
during its Saturday sales.
"If Shakey Jake can dress here..."he
chuckled, leaving the restof the thought
to imagination.
Students who think they are ashipas
Shakey Jake can also indulge in the
club's wide range of items for sale -
everything from furniture to sporting
goods to housewares to clothing. The
annual Fall Sale is being held today
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and tomorrow
from 9 a.m. to noon.
"A lot of college students comedown
trying to find pots and pans and plastic
wares," Sanchez said.
"We pull out the fall-oriented stuff
this weekend," Sanchez said. "The
grunge look is the look, and I want you
to know, we're the king of grunge.The
clothing prices are quite reasonable."
More than 80 percent of the funds
collected are contributed to more than
100 different organizations and schol-
arships.
'The costs of theoperation are small,
so we try to sell things at a good price,"
Sanchez said. "We all try to have fun at
it."
The Kiwanis Activity Center is lo-
cated at First Street and West Washing-
ton, north of the Blind Pig.

i
9 t
t+
F

MICHELLE GUY/ Daily
Brad Glasgow, LSA junior, signs a petition for Libertarian Alvin Anvers to include third parties on the Michigan ballot.
UHIS no longer county STD testing site
By RANDY LEBOWITZ cost of the program, she said, "I don't Obstetrics and Gynecology, said health
DAILY STAFF REPORTER think (the exactamount) makes adiffer- clinic patients will not notice a change.
For Washtenaw County residents, ence one way or the other, but it was a "We didn't set it up to pick up extra
the University Health Services (UHS) big chunk of money. people who won't get services at the
will no longer serve as a testing site for "The county has been experiencing University Health Services," Pearlman
sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). major financial problems and that was said.

1

FOR YOUR
EYE EXAMS & EYEGLASSES
Richarson s
rC
tl C

Financial limitations within the
Washtenaw County Human Services
Group - which used to pay UHS a
yearly stipend in order to keep the ser-
vice free to county residents-have led
to the termination of this program.
Vicki Nighswander, the AIDS/STD
Program Coordinator for Washtenaw
County Human Services said the
county's budget would no longer allow
for the program at UHS.
Although she refused to release the

where we had to cut," she added.
In place of the services at UHS, the
Adult Health Clinic of Washtenaw
County Human Services has expanded
its hours of operation. Clinic personnel
have a cooperative programwith the
University Hospitals' Obstetrics and
Gynecology Departmentand Infectious
Disease Department to test, treat and
counsel.
Even so, Mark Pearlman, an assis-
tant professor in the Department of

UHS will continue to provide HIV
testing; for community members, fac-
ulty and staff for a fee of $35. In con-
trast, the University Hospitals charge
between $50 and $60 for testing.
Free anonymous and confidential
STDservicesand HIV testing and coun-
seling will continue for the students.
"We want to make sure students
realize this isn't affecting the services
we are providing for them," Zielesko
said.

Calvin Klein
e y e w e ar
STUDENT DISCOUNTS

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