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December 08, 1993 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1993-12-08

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2 - The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, December 8, 1993
Europe, U.S. haggle over specifics of world trade pact 4

GENEVA (AP)-- An American-
European standoff on movies and air-
planes is the latest stumbling block
for a world trade deal, but the two
sides said yesterday they still have
time to make peace before the final
deadline.
The failure to resolve differences
over import restrictions on movies
and TV shows, and government sub-
sidies forjetli ner manufacturers came
after the United States and European
Community (EC) agreed on cutting
farm subsidies. The latter dispute had
held up the world trade talks for years.
With the clock ticking away to the

Dec. 15 deadline for completion of
broader 116-nation talks on lowering
trade barriers, negotiators criticized
Washington and the EC for not set-
tling all their differences.
Dec. 15 is the last day President
Clinton can notify Congress of a pro-
posed trade agreement under "fast-
track" rules barring lawmakers from
attaching amendments that could kill
the accord.
The head of the General Agree-
ment on Tariffs and Trade (GATT),
Peter Sutherland, called the trans-At-
lantic squabbles an "incredible folly."
At stake is a trade package that

'This is not a game. We're playing for jobs.'
- Mickey Kantor
U.S. Trade Representative

could add more than $200 billion an-
nually to the global economy by cut-
ting customs duties on imported
goods, easing border controls and
adopting tougher measures against
unfair trading. It is the most ambi-
tious trade reform package ever un-
dertaken.
After a 24-hour negotiating ses-
sion, U.S. Trade Representative

Mickey Kantor and his EC counter-
part, Sir Leon Brittan, were upbeat.
Kantor said there was "absolutely
and without a doubt" time to wrap up
an overall GATT deal.
"This is not a game," Kantor said.
"We're playing for jobs." He re-
mained unclear how the U.S. and EC
negotiators could come to terms on
the film and aircraft row.
Many Europeans fear lowering

barriers to entertainment programs
would bring an invasion by Holly-
wood that could wipe out the local
filmmaking industry that is viewed as
an important part of European cul-
ture.
The United States and the EC also
remain at odds over subsidies toair-
craft manufacturers.
Washington has complained for
years about government subsidies to
Airbus Industrie, aconsortium of com-
panies from Britain, France, Spain
and Germany that now rivals
America's plane-making giants,
Boeing and McDonnell Douglas.
Kantor said the United States had

The University of Michigan Medical School
Student Biomedical Research Programs
1994 Summer Research Fellowships
for
University of Michigan Medical Students and University of
Michigan Undergraduate Students
GENERAL INFORMATION MEETING'
Wednesday, December 8, 1993
5:30 p.m.
South Lecture Hall
3rd Floor, Med Sci IU
1994 Research Opportunities Handbook will be available
at the meeting.
For more information contact: Marcia Kennedy - Program Coordinator - 5113C Med Sci 1 - 763-1296

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POWER
Continued from page 1
During World War II, Power
served in the Office of Strategic Ser-
vices, working to develop micropho-
tography for use in the war effort. He
also supervised the filming of rare
British books and documents. In honor
of his service, he was made an honor-
ary Knight of the British Empire by
Queen Elizabeth II.
Power served from 1955 to 1966
on the University Board of Regents.
His daughter-in-law, Sarah Power
served on the board from 1975 until
her death in 1987. His son, Philip
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Power, was appointed to the board by
Gov. James Blanchard in 1987, and
was elected to a term of his own in
1990. He currently serves on the board.
The senior Power was appointed
by President Lyndon Johnson to serve
on the Council of the National En-
dowment for the Humanities. Later,
he served on the board of the National
Foundation for the Arts.
Power established the Power foun-
dation in 1967, which served as the
vehicle for many of his philanthro-
pies. Among them was the building of
the $1.4 million Power Center for the
Performing Arts on the University's
campus. The foundation established
the Power Exchange Scholarships

tried to accommodate Europe's stand
on those issues, but "we didn't find
the same kind of flexibility on the part
the Europeans."
Brittan said the two sides were
getting close on resolving the plane
dispute, but he seemed less optimistic
on the film battle.
Maclaren said the EC-U.S. farm
subsidies deal was acceptable al@
though the short-term, cuts in farm
subsidies were less than first sought.
Canada, Australia and Brazil are
all big farm exporters that have been
hurt by U.S. and EC subsidies that
keep prices low for American and
European foods on world markets.
between the University and Cam-
bridge in Great Britain.
Power remained active in AnO
Arbor, funding many philanthropic
projects and serving as chair of the
Ann Arbor Summer Festival in 1984.
Power served on the board of di-
rectors of Domino's Pizza, Daedalus
Enterprises Inc. and the Environmen-
tal Research Institute of Michigan.
Power received an honorary de-
gree in 1971 from the University.
Power's autobiography, whic@
was published in 1990, is titled "Edi-
tion of One." It is named after a revo-
lutionary process for printing copies
directly tlrough negatives he devel-
oped for Xerox.

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COMMITTEES
Budget PrioritiesJ
vice chairE
External RelationsC
vice chair7
Campus Governancej
vice chair
Rules and Elections E
vice chairF
CommunicationsC
vice chairE
COMMISSIONS
Women's IssuesL
Health Issues
Peace and Justice7
Students Rights
Environmental Issues
Academic Affairs
MSA
Continued from page 1
a drastic cut in its budget. AATU
maintained its funding but received a
reduced amount.
Bad feelings between the two
groups have remained since then. The
latest battle involved AATU's refusal
to accept MSA's three appointees to
its board of directors.
Inan attempt to persuade AATU
to accept its nominees, the assembly
placed AATU's remaining funds in
an escrow account, which AATU can-
not touch before an agreement.
"We've cut off the AATU's fund-
ing and that's not fair. They're a bit
loony, but it's a service for students,"
Whittaker said. "(MSA alone) met
with members of AATU last week
and got nothing accomplished."
Despite Whittaker's arguments,

Jacob Stern
Dani Walsh
Dani Walsh
Taryn Merkl
Julie Neenan
Stephanie Logan
Brian Elliott
Paul Scublinsky
Dave Pava
Bea Gonzales
Loretta Lee
Meg Whittaker
Tanya Clay
Vince Keenan
Michelle Ferrarese
Mike Christie Jr.

"

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761-1111
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the resolution failed, 17-10.
AATU staffer Pattrice Maurer said
she hopes the assembly will consider
the use of a mediator because it is time
to put a stop to the disagreements.
"We came back again today to say
we are ready to enter into a bindin4
negotiations to reach a mutually
(agreeable) compromise," Maurer
said. "It's shocking that they would
vote down such a resolution. Their
constituents have every right to be
disappointed."
She said the AATU has filed two
suits with MSA's Central Student
Judiciaryand plans on filing at least
one more today.
LSA Rep. Jacob Stern spoko
against the resolution, saying AATU
must to learn to work with people.
Stern is an assembly appointee.
"I don't know why we have to do
this," Stern said. "They'll just think
up some other little tactic."

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NEWS Melissa Peerless, Managing Editor
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