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November 19, 1993 - Image 11

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1993-11-19

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, November 19, 1993 -11

Icers wary of improved OSU

By PAUL BARGER
,DAILY HOCKEY WRITER

The cover of the media guide sums
it up for Ohio State. The yearbook
features four pictures of 1993-1994
Buckeye hockey players. The only
problem is they are all of the same
person, defenseman Tim Green.
Things just don't seem to be get-
ting better in Columbus. After every
season the Buckeyes try to reload, but
they keep misfiring. So far this year
they are 1-4-1 in the CCHA and sit in
ninth place.
Although their record does not
show it, there has been a marked im-
provement between this year's squad
(2-4-1 overall) and last year's (3-27-
2 CCHA, 5-30-2 overall).
"The defensive part of their game
has been pretty impressive," Michi-
gan head coach Red Berenson said.
"They have not scored that much, but
they're shutting other teams down."
After a one-goal performance last
Saturday against Lake Superior State,
none of the Buckeyes ranked in the
top 30 overall scoring leaders in the
CCHA. Ohio State has scored only 17
goals in seven games, giving the Buck-.
eyes a 2.43 average. Considering that

the entire CCHA is averaging 7.15
total goals per game in its first 33
contests, they have an obvious lack of
firepower.
In contrast, Michigan has five of
the top eight CCHA players in overall
scoring, and has compiled a6.13 goals
per game average. Keeping this in
mind, it would be easy to expect a
Wolverine letdown after back-to-back
weekend sweeps on the road.
"We get motivated to play be-
cause we're Michigan," Berenson
said. "We know we have to win our
home games and beat the teams that
are below us."
Ohio State goalie Tom Askey has
had a much easier season thus far due
to a vastly improved defense. He has
made 186 saves in over 427 minutes
of play and has earned a 3.09 goals
against average. Last year, Askey
made 661 saves in 1,235 minutes and
finished the year with a 6.07 GAA.
The resurgence of the defense can
be directly attributed to Green, the
team's captain. During the 1992-1993
campaign, Green was named Ohio
State's Most Valuable Player and
Defensive Player of the Year.
The power play has been power-

less in Columbus. The Buckeyes have
converted only 13.2 percent of their
opportunities with a man advantage.
The penalty killing unit is slightly
better, with a 79.1 percent success
rate.
The Buckeyes return most of the
squad from last year that was blasted
-by a combined score of 28-3 in three'
contests against the Wolverines. Still,
Michigan remains constantly on guard
for an upset.
"We know that in this league, any
team can beat anybody else on any
given night,"junior Mike Knublesaid.
"We're not going to take Ohio State
lightly. It is important that we play
with the same high level of intensity;
that we've been playing at."
Michigan's All-American
goaltender, Steve Shields, is unlikely
to see any action this weekend with a
strained left knee. Senior Chris Gor-
don, who played well against West-
ern Michigan and Illinois-Chicago,
will most likely get the nod. Sopho-
more Ryan Sittler is expected to play:
for the first time in three weeks after
suffering a shoulder injury in the first
period against Bowling Green Oct.
29.

DOUGLAS KANTER/Daily
Kevin Hilton and the Michigan hockey team take on perennial CCHA doormat Ohio State tonight and tomorrow at
Yost Ice Arena. The Wolverines are ranked second in WMEB (Orono, ME) hockey poll, just one point behind No. 1
Maine. However, they have more first place votes than Maine does.

Spikers ready to take on OSU, break records

Drop off your GRIDDESI picks at The Michigan Daily sports desk at 420
Maynard by noon today. The best predictor will win a $15 gift certificate to
O'Sullivan's. Contestants are restricted to five entries per week.

By J.L. ROSTAM-ABADI
DAILY SPORTS WRITER
Although no police report has been
filed, there is a lot of damage at the
corner of Hoover and South State. At
that intersection stands Cliff Keen
Arena, home of the Michigan
women's volleyball team.
The damage is a typical case of
breaking and entering - the breaking
and entering of new school career
records.
The latest incident occurred this
weekend. Five-foot-9 senior JoAnna
Collias was found guilty of destroy-
ing former dig leader Lisa Vahi's
total of 1,041 (1984-87). After com-
piling 34 digs in the Nov. 12-13
iMatches, Collias carries the hefty sum
of 1,070.
All fingers now point toward the
5-foot-10 senior co-captain, Michelle
Horrigan.
Only four kills shy of becoming
the school's queen of kills, it will not
be long before she joins her partner in
crime, Collias, and crushes the cur-
rent 1,060 mark set by Karen Marshall
between 1986-89.
Horrigan's opportunity to steal the

record will come this weekend when
the Wolverines travel eastward to meet
Big Ten conference leaders Penn State
(15-1 Big Ten, 24-3 overall) and Ohio
State (14-2, 20-4).
'Ohio State has shown
that they are beatable.'
-Michelle Horrigan
Michigan outside hitter
The match-ups could very well be
Michigan's biggest test of the season.
"(Penn State and Ohio State) are
the elite of our conference," Michi-
gan coach Greg Giovanazzi said. "I
think they're going to be very suc-
cessful in the postseason.
"Our biggest challenge will be to
play as steady as they play. They
don't make as many errors," he added.
"We tend to make a lot of hitting
errors.
"It will be a challenge to stay in
the game and not give up lots of points
quickly. I think we can do that if we
side out steadily."
The challenge begins Friday night
when Michigan ventures into Penn

State's lair. The Nittany Lions de-
voured the Wolverines in three con-
secutive games last month, 15-8, 15-
9, 15-7. Michigan will focus its strat-
egy on the serve.
"More so than before, we will re-
ally be focusing on serving as tough
as we can in order to get (Penn State
and Ohio State) out of their offensive
patterns," Giovanazzi said.
"We will not be as conservative as
before in serving," he said. "Like-
wise, we might make some service
errors, but that's a risk we've got to
take."
As Michigan looks ahead to its
match-up with Ohio State, the sec-
ond-place team in the Big Ten, the
Wolverines can take comfort in the
fact that the Buckeyes lost to Purdue
two weekends ago.
"Ohio State has shown that they
are beatable," Horrigan said.
Memories of last weekend's vic-
tory over the Boilermakers are still
fresh in Michigan's mind.
"It just shows we definitely can
beat (Ohio State)," Horrigan said.
"This is an opportunity just waiting to
happen."

1, Ohio State at Michigan
2. Penn State at Northwestern
3. Purdue at Indiana
4. Minnesota at Iowa
5. Wisconsin at Illinois
6. Boston College at Notre Dame
7. North Carolina St. at Florida St.
8. Miami at West Virginia
9. Tennessee at Kentucky
10. Alabama at Auburn
Tiebreaker - OSU at Michigan, Total
Name: Ph

11. Vanderbilt at Florida
12. UCLA at Southern Cal
13. Texas A&M at TCU
14. Clemson at South Carolina
15. Virginia Tech at Virginia
16. Colorado at Iowa State
17. Colorado State at Wyoming
18. Kansas St. at Oklahoma St.
19. Wash. St. at Wash.
20. Harvard at Yale
points:
'hone:

Horrigan
As the Wolverines set off for this
weekend's games, they have some-
thing else to smile about, too. Only
one key player remains on the injured
list -junior Aimee Smith - and the
healthy ones are breaking records left
and right.
"In light of how well we did last
week and in light of how we were
picked to finish in the conference in the
preseason, I expect us to play some
competitive ball," Giovanazzi said.

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STATE THEATRE Bargain Mat. 1st Show Daily
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Kevin Costner & Clint Eastwood in
A PERFECT WORLD

1
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i

Wrestlers gear up for St. Louis Open
By DAVE SCHWARTZ in the top four in the nation. year," he said. "The seniors should
DAILY SPORTS WRITER Experience and youth comprise help out the freshmen with techniques."
Asanothercoldwinter approaches, the Wolverines' roster this year. Ten If it's true that only the strong
things are just getting warmed up for lettermen return from last year and survive, Michigan should be "ripped"
the Michigan wrestling team. will be joined by 10 freshmen. after going through the schedule. The
Although dual match competition "We have a very unusual squad in Wolverines will face five teams this
doesn't begin until January, that we have four or five very experi- season that are currently ranked in the
Michigan's wrestlers will gear up for enced wrestlers and then we're kind top twenty: Penn State, Wisconsin,
the regular season today and Saturday of inexperienced after that," head Minnesota, Ohio State and Lehigh.
at the St. Louis Open. coach Dale Bahr said. "We have areal "It's a great conference and that
The results won't affect the Wol- outstanding freshman class who will makes the schedule very difficult," he
verines' record, but the Open will eventually be very good." said. "But when it comes time for the
provide an opportunity for Michigan Bormet feels the senior/freshman NCAAs, I think it's our schedule that
to see how it stacks up against other mixture will work out. has our kids ready for that kind of
teams. "We definitely look strong this competition."

a
a'
a

SeniorBrian Harper (150 lb. class)
is looking forward to a solid perfor-
mance.
"It's gonna be a tough tourna-
ment," he said. "However, I'll be
pretty upset if I don't finish in the top
three."
As for the team itself this season,
Michigan wants to improve on last
year (7-4 Big Ten, 13-5 overall). The
Wolverines wound up fifth in the con-
ference and 1 Ith nationally.
This year, Michigan is ranked tenth
in the nation with three senior wres-
tIers leading the way. Harper is ranked
No. 6 in his class, Bormet is third in
the 158 lb. class, and heavyweight
*Steve King is No. 2.
If Michigan were in any other con-
ference it would be one of the favor-
ites to win. The only problem is that
the Big Ten has three teams - Penn
State, Iowa and Minnesota - ranked
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