100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 15, 1993 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1993-11-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

8 - The Michigan Daily - Monday, November 15, 1993

Jubilee Singers
display cohesiveness

By MICHAEL COVARRUBIAS
"It's much more than gospel." So
said Albert McNeil, director and
founder of the Albert McNeil Jubilee
Singers. All those in the audience,
Albert McNeil
Jubilee Singers
Rackham Auditorium
November 11, 1993
Thursday night at Rackham Audito-
rium, knew exactly what he meant.
The group sang a selection of spiritu-
als, contemporary African-American
gospels, African and African-Ameri-
can folk songs and African-American
musical theater. The Jubilee Singers
were energetic, candid and absolutely
remarkable in their Ann Arbor debut.
The concert began with a group of
spirituals which warmed up the audi-
ence and introduced the incredibly
open-heartedperformance. Through-
out the evening the singers appealed
to the audience with incredible feel-
ing and an apparent conviction in

their powerful voices. The audience
responded to the music with enthusi-
asm and gave several standing ova-
tions after many of the songs. They
openly yelled "Sing it, girl!" "You
go, boy!" and "Well, alright!" while
the group performed its songs. Albert
McNeil encouraged the audience to
respond. "I don't care how you re-
spond, just respond!"
Several of the pieces werechoreo-
graphed, but much of the movement
on stage appeared to be completely
spontaneous and unrehearsed. There
were several soloists, and the audi-
ence applauded every one with fer-
vor. While on center stage, most of
the soloists moved freely about the
platform and reached out to the audi-
ence by leaning down and singing
directly to several listeners. It was
very obvious that the ensemble was
trying to communicate with the audi-
ence as directly as possible. The audi-
ence seemed to realize this and a
sense of camaraderie was apparent.
The most warmly and enthusiasti-
cally received songs tended to spiri-
tuals, although several of the musical
theater pieces drew strong reactions

STRATFORD
Continued from page 5
that their members would give an
additional five hours (on top of the
time they spend performing) for edu-
cational programming at the Univer-
sity.
This is highly unusual. Up to 60
members of their company are saying
that they value education as much as
they valueperformance. They're add-
ing these educational components as
a gift to the University."
Itis a gift which the University has
never before received. And one that
won't come again any time soon.
Ontario's Stratford Festival opens
their curtains on Ann Arbor this week
for arun that won't have the longevity
of their 1953 Canadian debut, but
ought to be at least as entertaining.
THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING
EARNEST will be performed at the
Power Center tomorrow at 8 p.m.
and Wednesday at 1 and 7 p.m.
Tickets are still available at the
UMS box office in Burton Tower for
$25 to $40. Student tickets available
with student IDfor $10 for the
Wednesday matinee only. Call 764-
2538 for more information.

01

Albert McNeil Jubilee Singers showed why it is that they are considered one of the greatest ensembles around.

from the auditorium. "Dat's Love,"
from "Carmen Jones" was certainly a
crowd pleaser, and one of the Folk
songs, "Marry a Woman Uglier Than
You," with tenor soloist, Richard
Wyatt, replete with choreography, was
another favorite.
The technique of the performance
was, for themost part incredibly good,
but not flawless. Some of the tempos
varied, and a few entrances were not
perfectly together. However, from a

musical perspective, the performance
was perfect. The voices melted to-
gether and flowed with wonderful
harmony. The entrances displayed
perfect intonation, and the few minor
instances of asyncrony seemed only
to remind the listeners that the beau-
tiful voices coming from the stage
were not being produced by automa-
tons, but passionate human beings.
The Jubilee Singers had entered
the stage with every intention of in-

cluding each listener in their musical
experience. AlbertMcNeil introduced
to Ann Arbor a group of 16 marvel-
ously talented singers. They all ex-
uded an excitement and love for the
music which enabled the audience to
share in those emotions. The Jubilee
Singers undertook their first Euro-
pean tour 25 years ago. Along the way
the group has attained a cohesiveness
and mastery of the music of which
few singing ensembles are capable.

THE

- - - - _

L Brussels * Paris London - Rome "Spain Israel
Chart a Course for Success...

.

INTER

V

IEW

SUIT

Whether you're
shopping for the
all-important
business suit or
building your
post-college
wardrobe,
there's no better
time to purchase
than right now.
Between now
and November
30, simply pre-

sent a valid
dent I.D. at
Redwood

stu-
any
&

.Ross store and
receive a 20%
discount on the
suit of your
choice.
Visit one of our
stores today and
take advantage
of this very spe-
cial offer.

... The waters of international business and commerce are
difficult to navigate. Let us guide you through the ebb and flow
of global change.
Combine the excitement of Graduate study in an
International setting with the academic excellence of
A Boston University Degree.
" Master of Arts in International
Relations
" Master of Science in Management
* A Boston University Degree
" Admission in January, April or
September
write: 755 j1NAME
Coin i-on------
wealth Ave., ADDRESS
Rm. 105, Boston, CITY STATE ZIP
MA, 02215 1-------------------
call: 617.353.2982 EDAYN TELEPHONE
x EVENING TELEPHONE
fax: 617.353.71240 am interested in: Q A Master of Arts in International 2 3I

Read the Daily
Recycle the Daily
5th AVE. AT LIBERTY 761-9700
THE AGE OF INNOCENCE (PG) - Fri, Mon, Wed, Thurs: 4:00,7:00, 9:50
Sat, Sun, Tues: 1:00, 4:00,7:00, 9:50 '
THE JOY LUCK CLUB (R) - Fri, Men, Wed, Thurs: 4:15,7:15, 10:05
I Sat, Sun, Tues: 1:15,4:15,7:15. 10:05
BARGAIN MATINEES$3.50BEFORE 6 PM
STUDENTS WITH ID $4.00 EVENINGS
FR EE 32 oz. DRINK
p c rnp horn Pre s t tis coupon with purchased ticket thru 11130 /33

>'

QUIZE1%

JeAW00 g oSS
Cranbrook Village " 840 W. Eisenhower 9 Ann Arbor 662-6400
Not valid in combination with any other offer.

CLASSIC SU
301 E. Liberty
at Fifth across from
Ann Arbor Theater.
668-7900

BS

regular sandwich
,9 bag of chips
med. drink
ex$. 11/ae1
large sandwich
99 bag of chips
med. drink
15 ex p. 11/30193

Relations D]A Master of Science in Management
BOs TON®t Brussels Program 1 Paris Program ] London Program
I°[1] Rome Program D Spain ProgramE Israel Program
UN___ER__ITY receive free information by fax, call 617.353.2744 ext.1s4
Brussels Paris - London - Rome " Spain " Israel

1 TI-I'r"E^AiE SENIESTER-Wmririter 1 994

VISITING PROFESSOR OF RELIGIOUS
THOUGHT LECTURE SERIES
THE THEORY ANDPRACTICEOF EVIL
IN THE 20TH AND 21ST CENTURIES
RELIGION 404/ Ralph G. Williams
Mondays - 7:30 - 9:30 PM
Natural Science Auditorium
The lectures are open to the public free of charge.

THE PROGRAM ON STUDIES IN RELIGION

is offering a

Theme Semester on

THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF EVIL
Refer to the LS&A Course Guide for complete class information.

January 10:
January 17:
4:00 P.M.
Nat. Sci. Aud.
January 24:
January 31:
February 7:
February 14:
February 28:
March 7:

EVIL: VIOLENCE AND DIFFERENCE
Opening Lecture: Violence and Difference
Ralph G. William, UM, English
MARTIN LUTHER KING LECTURE
Becoming an Evil Self: Silence, Ambivalence and the
Other.
Laurence Mordekhai Thomas, Syracuse University
Disorder and the Destruction of Meaning
Roy A. Rapport, UM, Anthropology
The Body of Evil: Difference and Violence.
Elaine Pagels, Princeton University, Religion
REPRESENTING EVIL
The Image of that Horror: Sensed Evil
Ralph G. WIliams, UM, English
Evil in the Eye: The representation of Evil in the
Visual Arts, Diane Kirkpatrick, UM, History of Art
Hearing Evil: Music, and Evil in the Abstract
Ralph Locke, Eastman School of Music
THE DISCIPLINES OF EVIL
Latent Evil; Language, Politics & the Communication

AMERICAN CULTURE DEPT., (Division 315)
490/Am. Film Genres: The Problem of Evil in American Culture.
4cr) EAGLE
ENGLISH DEPARTMENT, (Division 361)
317/ The Treatment of Evil in Literature & Film. (3cr) HOWES
483-00I/Primo Levi and the Memory of Auschwitz. (1cr) WILLIAMS
483-002/Evil in Late Shakespearean Drama. (icr) MCNAMARA
FILM AND VIDEO STUDIES, (Division 368)
413-002/Studies in Film Genres: Evil in Cinema. (3cr)
KONIGSBERG
i-
GERMAN DEPARTMENT,(Division 379)
442/ Faust & The Faust Legend. (3cr) AMRINE
HISTORY DEPARTMENT, (Division 390)
216/ World War I: The War that Redefined War. (3cr) MARWIL
A[7±iT?- .~ 1 V I * IAt i irzia

PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT, (Division 455)
401/ Doing and Resisting Evil Collectively: The Psychology of Social
Movements (3cr) LANDMAN
PROGRAM ON STUDIES IN RELIGION,
(Division 457)
404/ The Theory and Practice of Evil in the 20th and 21st Centuries.
(3cr) WILLIAMS
RESIDENTIAL COLLEGE, (Division 865)
322 Evil in Children's Literature. (4cr) BALDUCCI
ROMANCE LANG. & LIT. DEPT., (Division 371)
460/ Evil Individuals, Forms of Death and the Dance of Death in
Medieval Western Literature. (3cr) MERMIER
SLAVIC LANG. & LIT. DEPT., (Division 466)
490-002/ Shostakovich and the Evils of Totalitarianism: Russian
Culture under Stalin. (1cr) BARTLETT
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION, (Division 201)
642/ The Evil "Other". (3cr) TICE
SCHOOL OF MUSIC (Division 678)
605/ Sacred Music of the Renaissance: Martin Luther and His Circle.

s

I

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan