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November 12, 1993 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1993-11-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, November 12, 1993-- 3

Here's the question...

Why should
students vote
in MSA
elections?
The top seven
answers are on
the board:

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The Keg Party Family

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The Independent Party Family

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The Student's Party Family

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The Conservative Coalition Party Family

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The Michigan Party Family

By KAREN TALASKI
*ILY STAFF REPORTER
Imagine the University as a giant television
station. Its satillite beams out 24 hours of spe-
cialized programming to 36,000 viewers just
like you. Air waves radiate with campus
infomercials, situation comedies and dramatic
reinactments.
If this ever happens, the 1993 Michigan
Student Assembly Fall elections would prob-
bly be transformed into a highly rated game

show. More entertaining than "The Family
Feud," campus politics provide Channel U-M
with lots of glitz and glamour.,
But instead of big money prizes, MSA
student candidates battle for an assembly seat
and a chance to voice their concerns about
decisions that affect most of the campus.
The students sit on the sidelines, watching
MSA's political antics with a cynical eye.
They are quick to switch channels if the show

hard to answer.
With no clear winner in sight, both new
and seasoned candidates are willing to do
anything for a vote. Whether dragging MSA's
reputation through the mud or rallying around
old ideological differences, each candidate
promises to make the University a better place
for students.
As everyone knows, the show must go on.

becomes dull or the questions become

MSA Poling Sites

Location
EECS
Dow
Union
Fishbowl
Natural Resources
MLB
Dentistry
Business Lounge
Frieze
School of Ed
East Engineering
Public Health
Nursing
North Campus
Commons
CC Little
Art/Architecture
Music
Law

Tuesday, Nov. 16
8:05am-3:15pm
8:20am-3:30pm
8:20am-1 0:1 5pm
8:35 am-6:45pm
8:50am-1:00pm
9:05am-12:30pm
10:35am-1:10pm
9:35am-2:10pm
9:35am-11:30am
10:20am-12:45pm
10:50am-1:45pm
2:30 pm-5:00pm
12:30pm-3:00pm
10:35am-2-45nm

Wednesday, Nov. 17
8:50am-2:30pm
8:50am-9:15 pm
8:35am-5:45pm
9:05am-12:30pm
9:20am-12:45pm
9:35am-12:00pm
11:05-2:20pm
10:50am-3:00pm
11:35am-2:00pm

too T ~
One group that prides itself on having no
organized platform is the Beavis n' Butt-
Head party. Candidate Brent House said his
party's goal is to make "MSA what students
want it to be:" a place to have fun.
"We want MSA to get the junior politi-
cians out of there (and) give students some-
thing they could really enjoy," House said.
Candidates propose building a monorail
between North and Central campus as well as
showing episodes of "Beavis n' Butt-Head"
during MSA meetings to entertain constitu-
ents.
While Beavis n' Butt-Head candidates
struggle for recognition, older and more es-
tablished parties have found their campaigns
easier to manage.
Since its creation more than five years
ago, the Conservative Coalition (CC) has
been heavily involved in campus politics.
CC candidate Tracy Robinson said one
reason her party has been successful is its
constant showing in MSA elections.
um1WQaro t - Mnctaet lah .. cr^1"IA

party that began as a joke has grown into an
active branch of MSA.
While the Keg Party's first campaign fo-
cused on student happiness, its sophomore
attempt seems more concerned with improv-
ing the assembly by helping students create
change on campus.
Keg Party candidate Roger Premo said he
would like to see MSA get more involved in
issues such as campus safety. One of his
campaign goals is to increase the number of
lights on and around the Diag.
"If we could get that done, I would con-
sider that a major achievement for students,"
Premo said.
fh~ a c n Nrty F u ndy
Another young but familiar face to MSA
politics is The Michigan Party, boasting 14
diverse and informed candidates. After the
party's success in the last election, candidates
believe their reputation on campus is solid.
"The Michigan Party is the party that best
represents students and only student inter-
ests," candidate Jeff Alexander said. "If stu-
dents vote solely on a catchy moniker, they
are the only ones who will be disserviced."
Much of the Michigan Party's platform
revolves around continuing to fulfill the prom-
ises it made during the last semester: more
dorm meetings, increased allocations for stu-
dent groups, and less partisian bickering.
The~ Pr 9ressive Party
Progressive Party candidates, older than
most of the other students running, said they
want to bring their knowledge and experience
to the accomhlw' tahle

Students' Party. Candidates say they will be
"Putting the 'S' back in MSA." The party
claims to be the most diverse group running
for election, with students from many social,
cultural and political backgrounds.
Students' Party chair Devon Bodoh said
the party plans to provide more resources ford
minority groups by reorganizing the
assembly's Multicultural Affairs Commis-
sion and others task forces.
"When you look at MSA currently, you
see a lot of white males," Bodoh said. "This is
a very diverse campus and we need to reflect
that."
The Students' Party promises to increase
MSA's relationship with students on this cam-
pus as well as those around the country. "Stu-
dents need to be representated in both state
and local issues," said Conan Smith, Stu-
dents' Party co-chair.
The Independwnt Famiy
Although it may seem like the entire ballot-
is made up of political parties, 17 students
have entered the race as independents. While
some say it is more difficult to win an election"
as an independent, many students said they
prefer running as individuals.
"I wanted to have my own voice. I didn't
want policy dictated to me," said Scott Reizen.
"I like to be able to have my say and work for
something I believe in."
Benjamin Bolger, another independent,
said he thinks many students who run for
MSA forget they are representing students.
He said he wants to improve the assembly's
point of view.
"Change has to ultimately begin with one
student." Boler said. "It's a very serious

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