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September 09, 1993 - Image 67

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1993-09-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



101beMibitt 3a i

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Ann Arbor offers a
world of excitement
Believe it or not, art does thrive in the Midwest.
F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Madonna, Francis Ford
Coppola, Joyce Carol Oates, Lawrence Kasdan, Anthony Keidis, Diana
Ross and David Letterman all sprung up from the verdant valleys of the
glorious Midwest.
It's not all just voices in cornfields, football and lunatic postal workers.
And, as Renaissance Italy had its Florence, ancient Greece had its
Athens - well, the Midwest of the 1990s has its Ann Arbor.
Yes, this is the fabled land about which all those yuppies in "The Big
Chill" reminisced. This is the place from which Tom Hayden revolution-
ized a generation. This is the campus on which Madonna first used her
dancing skills for artistic expression. This is the city where Nirvana played
to a handful of people at the Blind Pig before the scent of teen spirit
spread across the republic.
So, when you settle into your new digs in Ann Arbor, show a little
respect for its history, its culture, its traditions. And that does not mean
avoiding setting foot on the "M" in the Diag. It means taking in the great
arts available for your entertainment and personal enrichment.
Go to Club Heidelberg and listen to some homespun talent. Sit in the
grand balcony of the Michigan Theater and watch a movie. Try out for a
University theater production. Try out to be a disc jockey for a local radio
station. Go see an opera at Hill Auditorium. Stop by the Bird of Paradise
for some jazz. Make tracks for Disco Night at the Nectarine Ballroom:.
Imagine the possibilities. You, too, could end up a novelist, a film-
maker, a talk show host, a Red Hot Chili Pepper.
After all, your time here is fleeting, but art is eternal.

L OCAL
BANDS
The local band scene in
Arbor is thriving, with more up-;
coming groups than any place this
of Boulder, CO. And they don't all
grunge or do covers for frat parties,
if you had to narrow the most pronit
bands down to a select ten (or, actu
11), then you'd come up with a
something like this ...
F ILM
Film has been called the
fnitive art of the 20th century (bott
Most Ann Arborites would prob
agree, as movies are big business it
town, be it the artsy stuff at the M
gan or the blood-and-guts-and-g
itous-sex spectacles at Showcase.]
definitive look at which of the
silver screens offer the most magi{
your entertainment dollar, check
page 3.

ETROIT
ARTS

5

Detroit is a mere 30 minutes
away. And don't believe the hype; it's a
fabulous city, brimming over with artis-
tic treasures - and the sumptuous Ti-
ger Stadium to boot. So make a run
(does your roomate maybe have a car?)
for the late, great Motor City before the
merciless Governor Engler crushes it
with his mighty fist, knocking all the
beauty and life out of it once and for all.

ALK
e de- SHOWS

6

The youth of the '20s was
dubbed the Lost Generation. The youth
of the '60s was the Baby Boomer gen-
eration. We're either Generation X or
the Talk Show Generation. If the latter is
true, then Montel Williams is the F.
Scott Fitzgerald, the Timothy Leary of
the day. Be afraid. Be very afraid.

B OOKSTORES 4

T HEATER

7

By the time you hitmidterms,
the idea of actually reading for pleasure
may seem like a lost notion leftover
from your naive youth, butdon't let that
stop you from checking outAnn Arbor's
virtual plethora of bookstores. For the
inside scoop on where to buy your text-
books and where to buy your Anne
Rice, John Grisham or Tolstoy (de-
pending on your level of ambition),
read Darcy Lockman's guide to the
local book scene.

Ah! The smell of greasepaint,
the roar of the crowd. Yes, Ann Arbor
theater virtually pulses with campy ex-
citement during the school year. Last
year, Thornton Wilder's classic "Our
Town" (middle)drew in lumbering herds
of student theater connoisseurs, and this
year should prove no different. To get a
peek at what University theater has in
store, turn, dramatically, to page 7.
CHIGAN
THEATER
The glorious Michigan The-
ater is more than just a place to see
movies (though its capabilities in that
regard cannot be overestimated). It of-
fer plays, concerts, musicals and a real
sense of living history. This 1920s movie
palace is the spoke on which the wheel
of Ann Arbor's art scene turns. Learn
more about it and thereby become a
better person.

FILE PHOTO

VISITING
WRITERS

5

What doAllen Ginsberg, Scott
Turow, Joyce Carol Oates and Jamaica
Kincaid all have in common? Believe it
or not, they've all taken the time out
from their jet-setting, rich-and-famous
author lives to bless Ann Arbor with
their presence. For more on how you,
too, can be in the presence of literary
stardom, turn to page 5 for the straight
dope on the Visiting Writers program.

T HOMAS
DOLBY

9

,F

INE
ARTS

5

Thomas Dolby. Remember
him? That "She Blinded Me With Sci-
ence" guy? Yeah, him. Well, there's alot
more to him than an old pop song from

..... _ .. _,n___

W. "iUMVI M-

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