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November 07, 1993 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1993-11-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

11

Icers knock off
top-ranked LSSU,
then beat Ferris

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One hundred three years of editorial freedom
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Parents visit
'U,' leave
students fed,
well-clothed
By MELISSA PEERLESS
DAILY NEWS EDITOR
Thousands of credit cards were
worn thin this weekend when parents
visited the University's campus --
leaving students with new clothes,
full stomachs and stories that belong
on "America's Most Embarrassing
Home Videos."
Matt Blosl, an LSA first-year stu-
dent from Kalamazoo, said his par-
ents humiliated him during the pre-
football game tailgate with overzeal-
ous displays of maize and blue spirit.
"When the band was playing, they
were going crazy," he said. "I was
really embarrassed because I was with
a bunch of my friends."
Students said their parents enjoyed
being back on campus, but showed
that a lot has changed since they were
in college.
"My mom was really excited for
the game. She was freaking out," said
ISA first-year student Mike Sweeney,
whose parents came from Chicago.
Kate Calabresa, an ISA first-year
student from Libertyville, Ill., said
she enjoyed her parents' visit.
"I gave them a walking tour of the
Diag and all of the nice buildings and
the Union," she said. "They had a
good time. They were gladthey came."
Calabresa said she did not attend
the events planned by the Student
Alumni Council (SAC) because she
#wanted freedom to do what she chose
during her parents' two-day stay.
"Friday night we saw Garrison
Keillor and we went to the game on
Saturday and we went shopping on
Sunday," she said, adding that many
activities were quite expensive.
SAC members planned an array of
activities centering around the theme
"UnforgettaBLUE ... that's how it
will be." Friday evening featured lec-
tures and performances and
Saturday's main event was a pre-game
tailgate party. Sunday brunch was
served in the Michigan Union Ball-,
room.
Parents Weekend Co-Chair Eric
Bullard called the program a success.
See PARENTS, Page 2

DARWIN ten
Mataranka -
Larrimah--
Daly Waters
Donmarra Roadhouse Elliott
Renner Springs
Tennant Creek
The Maize and Blue reachedBarwCek
Daly Waters, Northern Territory Tir re
during its first day on the road. Alice Springs
It finished the day in seventh
place. The Honda Motors car Kulgera gal
held the lead after the first day. Maria
Coober Pedy CC r?
Pimba
ANDREW LEVY/DailyGraphic Port Augusta
Port Pine
ADELAIDE

Race begins;
'U' solar car
cruises in 7th

By PETER MATTHEWS
DAILY STAFF REPORTER
NEAR DALY WATERS, Austra-
lia - After more than nine hours of
racing through the sun-scorched Aus-
tralian outback, the University's
Maize and Blue solar car team pulled
over and set up camp 362 miles from
the Darwin starting line.
Team members chose the spot for
its exposure to the brutal sun, which
charges the car's battery.
Exhausted but jubilant, the team
settled down to go to bed. After day
one of the World Solar Challenge,

Maize and Blue was in seventh place
overall, and ahead of all other Ameri-
can teams.
"Our car ran well with no major
problems," said University team
member Dan Ross, adding that over-
cast skies had cut power to all ve-
hicles during a portion of the after-
noon.
Termite mounds and red ant hills
dot the pale foliage that covers the
ground surrounding the tents and ve-
hicles. And dozens of flies attempt to
crawl into the students' eyes, ears and
See RACE, Page 2

Annual list of 'U' salaries to be released today

By ANDREW TAYLOR
DAILY STAFF REPORTER
Faculty and staff salary figures for
the current academic year will be re-
leased today.
Employees have received raises
ranging from 2.5 to 7 percent, accord-
ing to the 1993-94 Faculty and Staff
Salary Record.
The complete Salary Supplement
will be available later this month at
the Student Publications Building.
University President James
Duderstadt is the highest paid non-
medical school employee. His salary,
of $206,070, an increase of more than
$25,000, brings his salary in line with
his peers at other academic institu-
tions.
This year, Dr. Mark Orringer, head
of the Department of Thoracic Sur-
gery, nabbed the top spot on the sal-
ary listing from the chair of the De-
partment of Surgery. Orringer re-
ceived an 8 percent raise to bring his
salary to $225,070.
Surgery chair Dr. Lazar Greenfield
had been the best-paid faculty mem-
ber for the last two years. His salary is
$216,913.
LSA Dean Edie Goldenberg is the
highest paid female non-medical em-

ployee with a $162,500 salary.
Outstanding faculty members re-
ceived merit increases to compensate
for last year's pay freeze.
"The central administration made
2.5 percent new salary money avail-
able to the individual (schools)," said
Walter Harrison, vice president for
University relations. "And we told
them we hoped they would supple-
ment the 2.5 percent."
Harrison said none of the raises
are based on seniority. "Among our
non-bargained for staff and faculty,
all of our raises are merit only," he
said.
Harrison said the 2.5 percent sal-
ary budget increase came largely from
money shifted from operating ex-
penses.
He said that in his department, he
lost 2 percent from his total budget
and was given a 2.5 percent increase
in his salary budget.
He added that this change is not
equivalent because the total budget is
much larger than the salary budget.
Still, he approved of the switch,
saying, "People are our most impor-
tant resource."
Harrison explained where the ad-
ministration obtained the additional

money to give some people the largest
raises.
"(Departments) would either cut
their operating budget or they would
cut the numbers of people they have
so they could give the increases," he
said.
The average professor working
two semesters a year earns $73,420
and the typical assistant professor re-
ceives $44,384, according to a spokes-
person for Office of Academic Plan-
ning and Analysis.
On average, lecturers are paid
$29,277 for two terms.
The executive officers of the Uni-
versity - including Duderstadt and
the six vice presidents - all make
more than $125,000 per year.
None of the executive officers re-
ceived a raise last year. All but one
received a raise this year.
Gilbert Whitaker, provost and ex-
ecutive vice president for academic
affairs, is paid $192,042, a 9 percent
increase. He is the second highest
paid non-medical employee.
Farris Womack, executive vice
president and chief financial officer,
makes $186,056.
Maureen Hartford, vice president
See SALARY, Page 2

Below is a comparison of a few top salaries at the
University to the salary of a typical professor and
lecturer, and to a basic student's tuition.

, 4"&**
R N4-

: z M 2

This bar compares tuition
payments to the salaries
shown. The units used are
$16,032 to compare the cost
a junior or senior out-of-state
student would pay if they took
classes all year.

M 10

$=6,070

160??

*The average
professor and
lecturer rate is for 12
months though many
faculty members
work only eight
months a year and
earn less.
$110,130

$130A,00

26
25
22
21L
20
19
18..
7
116
113
12
11
14
9
8_
6
2
1

C1
2
V
Oc

.I
,..
IQ
w

average
lecturer*
$43,915

ANDREW TAYLOR/Daily

i<

'U' students advise
alcohol temperance
for awareness week

By RANDY LEBOWITZ
DAILY STAFF REPORTER
"Decisions on tap."
That is the motto for the
:ampuswide Alcohol Awareness
Week, which
began yesterday
D5gI$ION$ and will run
ON TP through Satur-
day.

nior.
This is the first year students have
been responsible for the planning of
Alcohol Awareness Week. Sklar ex-
pressed his excitement that individual
campus groups are sponsoring differ-
ent events.
"(We have) an amalgam of groups
each providing their own programs
and the result is the Alcohol Aware-
ness Week. ...It's a great thing," he
said.
LSA senior, member of the Alco-
hol Awareness Week Committee and
Chair of the University Activity Cen-
ter (UAC)'s Viewpoint Lectures,
1- ..-.1 - -a _a 1

Art Exhibit:
A Woman I Recovery
Beth Cowan, artist
Art Lounge, Michigan Union
Through Nov. 13,
Alcohol & the Law
Workshop by Student Legal Services
Mon., Nov. 8 & Wed. Nov. 10
4 - 5 p.m.
Mike Green
Pittsburgh Penguin Hockey Player
Rackham Auditorium
Wed., Nov. 10, 8 p.m.
Lonise Blas

ASSOCIATED PRESS
William Dees, who wrote the flir-
tatious "Oh, Pretty Woman" with the
late singer Roy Orbison, detested 2
Live Crew's ribald rewrite of the 1964
rock classic.
"It's like if someone asks you if
they could use the car," he said. "We
said no, but they take it and paint it all
different colors."
A dispute over the rap remake has
reached the U.S. Supreme Court and
turned into a test of copyright law's
strength and the boundaries of satire.
Dolly Parton, Michael Jackson,
comedian Mark Russell and the pub-
lishers of Mad Magazine are among
those who have filed briefs with the
court on both sides of the case. which

U.S. Supreme Court to rule
on 2 Live Crew rap sampling

after a song is recorded, as long as
writers and publishers are credited
and receive royalties. But rewrites
fall into murkier legal territory.
Acuff-Rose refused permission. 2
Live Crew went ahead anyway, bor-
rowing the song's trademark guitar
riff for verses that taunt a "big hairy
woman," a "bald-headed woman" and
a 'two-timin' woman."
The publishers sued, claiming
copyright infringement.
"You're not doing anything to
harm the copyright. You're just hav-
ing fun," said Luther Campbell, leader
of 2 Live Crew. "I've had it done to
myself a few times - on 'Saturday
Night Live,' they imitated me and had
fun with my records."

Organizers
say the aim of
the week is not
to preach absti-
nence from al-
cohol, but rather
A S ten fnr mod-

I

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