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October 18, 1993 - Image 13

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1993-10-18

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The Michigan Daily - SPORTSMonday - Monday, October 18, 1993 --5

P

E

NN
Lions
Mistakes on o
By KEN SUGIURA
DAILY FOOTBALL WRITER
STATE COLLEGE - Penn
State's 1,000th game was one the
Nittany Lions will always remember.
But Saturday's contest with Michigan
won't be much of a scrapbook-filler
for them.
For despite the fact that Michigan
was penalized more often for more,
yards, and even though Penn State
committed only one turnover, it was
the Nittany Lions who were kicking
themselves for their costly mistakes
and cursing their lack of execution in
their 21-13 loss to Michigan in Beaver
Stadium.
"All game, we were dominating,"
said Penn State tackle Marco Rivera
of his offense's play. "The only thing
was, we didn't score when we had to."
Rivera's statement accurately rep-
resented the feeling of his team.
Coaches and players said that they had
let Michigan off the hook with their
mistakes and beaten themselves.
"We missed too many opportuni-
ties to win this type of game. We just
made too many mistakes," Penn State
coach Joe Paterno lamented.
"They made plays and no mis-

S

T

A

T

E

1

3

not without their chances
ffense make PSU's 1,000th game a bitter memory

GAME STATISTICS

takes," said Penn State defensive
tackle Tyoka Jackson of his oppo-
nents, "and we made mistakes and
didn't quite make certain plays, and
that's why we lost. That's it in a nut-
shell."
Of all the miscues committed by
the Nittany Lions, there were a hand-
ful that will likely stick in their collec-
tive craw the longest.
While the Penn State series that
ended with four fruitless plays on the
Michigan 1-yard line was the most
obvious example of a lack of execu-
tion, there were other select instances
that had the Nittany Lions burning up.
They were already experiencing
frustration in the first quarter, while
the game was still young and Penn
State tailback Ki-Jana Carter was rip-
ping up huge chunks of yardage at a
time off against the Michigan defense.
On their first two possessions,
quarterback Kerry Collins directed the
Lion offense deep into Michigan ter-
ritory. The first drive went as far as the
Michigan 3, the second reaching the
Michigan 18.
However, penalties pushed Penn
State back and stalled both drives. On
second and goal from the Michigan 3,

an illegal motion call took the Nittany
Lions to the 8, and following two
ineffective Collins' passes, Penn State
placekicker Craig Fayak blew a 25-
yarder wide left.
On their next drive, a first-and-10
situation from the Michigan 18 was
killed when illegal motion again set
the Lions back five yards. After two
more incomplete Collins passes -
the second batted down by Michigan
linebacker Matt Dyson -the Nittany
Lions again called upon Fayak, who
this time nailed a 40-yarder.
"We had the opportunities to rout
them and we didn't capitalize on those
opportunities," Collins said. "We came
away with two drives from inside the
20 with three points. Against a good
football team like that, you're not go-
ing to win the game."
Another costly blunder came mid-
way through the third quarter. A Michi-
gan drive that had begun at its own 20
had stalled at Penn State's 23. On
fourth and five, placekicker Pete
Elezovic came out for his second field-
goal attempt of the day after missing
his first.
On their next possession, the Wol-
verines had only 10 men on the field,

and Michigan guard Shawn Miller had
to race onto the field and take his
stance moments before the snap. In
order to avoid a delay-of-game call,
Jay Riemersma had to hurriedly set up
the snap.
However, before snapper Marc
Bolach could get the ball to
Riemersma, the left side of the Penn
State line jumped offsides. The in-
fraction gave Michigan a first down
and bailed out Elezovic, whose wide-
left kick was rendered inconsequen-
tial.
"We made a mental mistake by
being offsides and we gave them an-
other chance," Penn State linebacker
Eric Ravotti said.
Three plays later, Todd Collins
made the most of the Penn State gift
by connecting with a diving Mercury
Hayes in the corner of the end zone for
Michigan's first lead of the day, 14-
10.
Michigan coach Gary Moeller
called it "a big turning point of the
game."
"They capitalized on that chance
and it was our fault," Ravotti said.
"We made a lot of mistakes that
should've never happened."

PASSING
Player C-A
K. Collins 16-30
Tot. 16-30

Yds TD
182 1
182 1

Int
I
I

RUSHING

Player
Carter
Archie
O'Neal
Milne
K. Collins
Totals

Att
19
9
5
1
6
40

Yds
127
42
9
2
-1,
179

Avg
6.7
4.7
1.8
2.0
-.2
4.5

Lg
33
I1
4
2
3
33

RECEIVING

Player I
Brady
Engram
O'Neal
Labarca
Archie
Pitts
Totals
PUNTING
Player
Muscillo
Totals

No.
5
3
3
2
2
1

Yds
53
60
33
16
14
6

Avg Lg
10.618
20.0 37
11.016
8.011
7.0 8
6.0 6

r1hat Lo FNsEfur. I
1+re. Michigan held the Lions on four

16 182 11.237
No. Yds Avg Lg
415338.342
415338.342

ROUNDUP OSU continues to roll in conference play
ES.PLAYDOCT.1.,19. 3 with 28-21 victory over Michigan State

PUNT RETURNS

W3SOCIATED PRESS
Raymont Harris scored on a 7-
y rd run with 1:06 remaining as Ohio
State overcame five turnovers to hold
of f Michigan State, 28-21, Saturday.
Michigan State's Bill Stoyanovich
missed four field goals for the Spar-
tats (1-1 Big Ten, 3-2 overall), who
moved into Ohio State territory on all
12 of their possessions.
Ohio State, 6-0 for the first time
stice 1979, shares the Big Ten lead
w th Wisconsin, each at 3-0.
The Buckeyes, two-touchdown
favorites, built a 21-10 lead through
three quarters on three touchdown
catches by Joey Galloway, who had
nice receptions for 186 yards.
He caught passes covering 22 and
14 yards from Bob Hoying and 64
^rds from backup quarterback Bret
ewers.
Meanwhile, Michigan State was
m )ving the ball up and down the field
but not scoring. The Spartans got in-
side the Ohio State 20 four times in
th ; first half but only had seven points
tc show for their efforts.
But Stoyanovich, who followed a
4' -yard field goal with misses from
3, 34 and 20 yards, kicked a 21-
*rder on the first play of the fourth
quarter.
Ohio State, which lost three
ft mbles, promptly gave the ball back
when Hoying tossed his second inter-
c ption. He overthrew a receiver and
Steve Waslyk picked it off and re-
tumed it 19 yards to the Spartans 40.
The Spartans drove to the Buck-
e, es' 21, but again Stoyanovich
issed, this time a 39-yard attempt
at was wide right. His three earlier
misses were all wide left.
The Buckeyes gave the ball back
tc Michigan State at the Ohio State 38
at er a 14-yard punt. On the first play,
Jign Miller hit fullback Scott Greene
over the middle and he carried two
d, fenders into the end zone to cut the
Id to 21-19.
Miller completed 31-of-42 passes
r 360 yards with no interceptions.
On the two-point conversion with
5 37 remaining, Miller made a high
tla ow into the right corner of the end
zs .ne where Mill Coleman outjumped

defender Marlon Kerner to make the
grab that tied the game.
Ohio State came right back, taking
over at its 20. With Powers, who com-
pleted 7-of-10 passes for 113 yards,
now at the controls, the Buckeyes put
together a 15-play drive that ate up
4:31.
Three times the Buckeyes con-
verted on third-and-1situations. Faced
with third and 10 at the Michigan
State 38 with 2:13 left, Powers found
Galloway on a sideline pattern for 17
yards.
Harris then picked up 11, three and
then the final seven yards for the touch-
down as a homecoming crowd of
93,989 roared.
Miller completed four straight
passes to get the ball to the Ohio State
46 with six seconds left, but his long
pass for Nigea Carter near the goal
line was batted down as time expired.
Harris finished with 103 yards on
22 carries. Hoying hit 14 of 31 passes
for 181 yards and the two intercep-
tions. He was pulled after the second
interception.
Steve Holman, who had 52 yards
on 17 carries, had scored Michigan
State's first touchdown on a 1-yard
run in the second quarter. It was the
first touchdown on the ground permit-
ted by Ohio State this season.
Illinois 49, Iowa 3
Ty Douthard scored three touch-
downs and Chris Richardson kicked
four field goals as Illinois enjoyed its
best offensive outing in two years,
beating slumping Iowa, 49-3, Satur-
day.
Last in the Big Ten in total offense,
Illinois (2-1, 2-4) amassed a season-
high 475 yards and tagged Iowa with
its most lopsided conference loss in
coach Hayden Fry's 15 seasons. The
Hawkeyes (0-4, 2-4) are off to their
worst Big Ten start since 1973, when
they finished 0-11.
Iowa has scored only two touch-
downs in its last 18 quarters and quar-
terback Paul Burmeister has been
sacked 20 times in conference play.
Illinois sacked him three times and
held Iowa to 240 yards.

It was the highest-scoring game
for Illinois since a 51-10 victory over
Houston, Sept. 21, 1991.
Minnesota 28, Northwestern 26
Scott Eckers passed for three touch-
downs in fog-shrouded Dyche Sta-
dium Saturday and Minnesota had to
hold off a 13-point, fourth-quarter rally
to defeat Northwestern, 28-26.
The Gophers broke a 13-game
road-losing streak and won two in a
row for the first time since 1990.
Northwestern trailed, 28-10 ,early
in the third in the Big Ten clash, but
three field goals by Sam Valenzisi
and a 26-yard touchdown pass from
Lenny Williams to Mike Senters
helped close the gap.
Turnovers and penalties by the
Gophers (2-2, 3-4) enabled the Wild-
cats (0-3, 2-4) to make their come-
back.
Wisconsin 42, Purdue 28
Although off to its best start since

1912, Wisconsin isn't ready to start
talking about the Rose Bowl.
The Badgers remained unbeaten
Saturday with a 42-28 Big Ten victory
over Purdue. Darrell Bevell threw for
204 yards and four touchdowns in less
than three quarters and Brent Moss
rushed for 139 yards.
Before home games against Ohio
State, Wisconsin (3-0, 6-0) plays at
Minnesota.
"They're going to discuss the Axe,"
Wisconsin coach Barry Alvarez said
in reference to the 103-year-old ri-
valry between the Badgers and Min-
nesota. "We won't worry about the
next five, we'll worry about the next
one and that's my concern. That's the
approach we're taking."
Bevell was 15-of-20 before leav-
ing the game with a sprained hip. His
final pass was to Matt Nyquist for a 7-
yard score, giving Wisconsin a 35-0
lead with 10:53 left in the third quar-
ter.
"Bevell has a strained leg muscle

from the thigh," Alvarez said. "He
played the last three series with it.
Rather than take any chances, I sent
him to the hospital for him to start
treatments immediately."
"I'll be back next week," Bevell
said.
The victory assured the Badgers
their first winning season since the.
1984 team finished 7-4-1, and kept
them in a tie for the Big Ten lead. The
Boilermakers (0-3, 1-5) didn't get
across midfield until midway through
the third quarter when Rick Trefzger,
playing in place of Matt Pike, moved
Purdue 80 yards in eight plays to score
on an 11-yard pass to Jermaine Ross.
"I thought we played exception-
ally well right up to the point where
we went ahead, 35-0," Alvarez said.
"I was very disappointed with our
defense from that time on."
Wisconsin built a 21-0 halftime
lead on touchdown passes of 30 yards
to Keith Jackson and eight yards to
Terrell Fletcher.

Player
Engram
Totals

No.Yds
2 20
2 20

Avg Lg
10.0 11
10.0 11

KICKOFF RETURNS
Player No.Yds Avg Lg

Hammonds
Totals

2
2

40
40

20.0 20
20.0 20

Archie

DEFENSE
Player
Gelzheiser
Monaghan
Benfatti
Clair
Rubin
Jackson
Dingle
Forbes
Holmberg
Killens
Ravotti
Hammonds
Bochna
Herring
Yeboahkodie
Smith
Miller
Archie
Pittman
Totals

Tac
4-
7y
2
4
2
5
2
2
0
1

2
1
1
0
I
1
1
0
36

Ast
10
2
7
3
4
0
2
1
3
2
3
0
I
1
2
0
0
0
I
42

Tot
14
9
9
7
6
5
4
3
3
3
3
2
2
2
2
1
78

Ohio State's Raymont Harris (34) lunges in the end zone for the winning touchdown Saturday against Michigan State.
The No. 3 Buckeyes defeated the Spartans, 28-21.

PENN STATE
Continued from page 12
rick Alexander took over.
Sprung by Burch, the senior scam-
pered 48 yards for a touchdown, breath-
ing life back into the Michigan effort.
"I just ran to the left, and saw Alfie
Burch make the block," Alexander

offsides. Three plays later, Michigan
quarterback Todd Collins found Mer-
cury Hayes open in the left side of the
endzone for a 16-yard touchdown re-
ception, giving Michigan a 14-10 lead,
and one it would never relinquish:
Penn State coach Joe Paterno
pointed to the offsides penalty as an
example of the mistakes that brought
down his team.

Many in the stadium expressed
surprise at Paterno's decision to run
through the line four times, instead of
attempting an outside run or pass.
"I guessed wrong ... but we felt we
could sneak in," Paterno said. "We
were concerned about stunts, since
they've played very well down there."
"It was our weakest moment,"
Kerry Collins said. "It was a turning

"I ..... ...."

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