100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 09, 1993 - Image 44

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1993-09-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 12- The Michigan Daily-New Student Edition-University-Thursday, September 9, 1993

Dorm life can be enjoyable
Aside from the cafeteria and the shower, that is

/0010

by Monica Moon
Daily St-aff Reporter
Every August, residence halls around Ann Arbor eagerly
prepare for the arrival of thousands of new students. Moving
day can be chaos as streets become congested with Ryder
trucks and hot, agitated families. During move-in, many
students are intimidated at the prospect of living with 1,365
people in the massive structure known as South Quad.
Infamous for its rowdy residents and fire alarms, South
Quad is termed the "party dorm" on campus. Despite this
reputation, the dorm, like all residence halls, offers many
R ESIDENCEH A LLS
positive programs.
For example, Ambatana is South Quad's organization for
multicultural residents. In addition to having programs like
this, most residence halls have a snack bar, weight room, t.v.
lounge, arcade and computing center.
For those interested in living in a smaller community of
students, residence halls like Mosher Jordan, East Quad and
Couzens house approximately 500 students.
Mosher Jordan - shortened to Mojo - is one of a
range of residence halls located on the hill. Living on the
hill can be a very different experience than living on
Central Campus. Due to the fact that libraries, restaurants
and classes are farther away from the hill, students take
advantage of facilities like the Central Campus Recre-
ation Building (CCRB), Palmer Field, and restaurants
like Angelo's.
LSA junior Robert Jasak found it a pleasure to live on the
hill. "As a former resident of Markley, it was nice to be close
to both the CCRB and the arboretum," Jasak said.
Stockwell, another residence hall on the hill, was named
after Madelon Louise Alberts, the first female student admit-

ted to the University. Stockwell is one of four all-female
residence halls on campus.
Kinesiology junior Theresa Fiorito lived in Helen
Newberry - a women's residence hall on Central Cam-
pus - her first year. "Living in an all-female dorm is
great because you do not have to worry about your
appearance and the community feels more close-knit,"
Fiorito said.
Regardless of which residence hall you choose, there are
many activities and personnel common to them all. During
move-in you will probably meet the resident advisor (RA)
who will live on your hall throughout the school year. This
individual deals with any questions and problems that may
arise during the year.
Heading downstairs to the cafeteria can be a habitual
nightmare. Starchy dorm food and late-nigt study breaks
are often the catalyst for gaining the infamous "freshman
fifteen." However, on a positive note, the cafeteria staff
plans theme dinners that make dorm food a little more
exciting.
Using the community showers is another event many*f
dread. The bathrooms are not always pretty - especially
after the weekend. For this reason, most students wear flip-
flops or some form of shower shoes. In addition, a small
waterproof basket is necessary to carry toiletries to and from
the shower.
If the party scene is not your style, nearly every weekend
there is something to do in your residence hall. Some
activities are planned by your hall council, like ice-skating at
Yost Ice Arena or attending a Michigan hockey game.
But most of the time it's nice to hang out with the people*
on your hall and get to know them better. LSA junior Jen
Henderson enjoyed living in West Quad for two years. "I
have met some of my best friends in the dorm," Henderson
said.
Aside from braving the bathroom and conquering the
cafeteria, living in a residence hall can be a great experience.

3-PIECE OFFICE SYSTEM
60"X 30" DESK, FILE PEDESTAL, MOBILE RETURN
BLACK OR WHITE.
REG. $324.99
SALE $249.99
STUDENT DESK W/ DRAWER
42W."x24D"x30"H
Black or White
Reg. $79.99
SALE $69.99

2-PIECE OFFICE SYSTEM
60"X 30" DESK, FILE PEDESTAL
BLACK OR WHITE.
REG. $229.98
SALE $199.99
COMPUTER DESK
w/pullout keyboard tray
39W"x24D" x30H"
Black or White
Reg. $124.99
SALE $99.99

_ L

I ',-

~1~~~

p

BOOKCASE
72"X30"X12"
Black, White, or Cherry
Reg. $79.99
SALE $69.99
3 for $199.99

TOWER BOOKCASE
72"X15"X12"
Black, White or Cherry
Reg. $69.99
SALE $59.99

SMARTCASE
68"X28"X9"
Black or White
Reg. $59.99
SALE $49.99

MARTIN VLOET/Daily
East Quad residence hall houses many students during the summer Orientation period and holds approximately 500
residents during the school year.

COAT TREE-TUBE STEEL
Black or White
List $94.99
SALE $74.95

/ _'-'

0

MTS offers convenience and

COMPUTER MATE
w/pullout keyboard tray, on castors
Black or White
Reg $124.99
SALE $99.99

2-WAY HALOGEN
DESK LAMP
Red, Yellow, Royal Blue, Raspberry,
Black, White, Teal.
Reg. $59.00
SALE $49.00
TWIN BED-TUBE STEEL
Black or White
List $289.99
SALE $179.95
(Pop-up Trundle also available,
not shown $169.95)

,a

1111

ease to Uni
by J.B. Akins
Daily Staff Reporter
If calling home every week is out of
your budget and you don't like to write
letters, whatdo you do? Well, the Michi-
gan Terminal System (MTS) is here for
you. No more stamps and envelopes,
computer mail is the answer.
MTS is the University Information
Technology Division's (ITD) premiere
computer messaging network. Itallows
you to write and send messages to any-
one in the world who has an E-mail
account.
In order to use MTS and other
programs, you must have a userID.
UserlDs are assigned by the ITD Ac-
counts Office and serve to identify
the type of account you have. A wide
variety of MTS
accounts are
available de-
pending on the in-
tended use of the
account and yourA
status at the Uni- 7
versity.'
You can re-
ceive an MTS ac-
count by taking
your student I.D.
to the North Uni-
versity Building
on centralcampus.
There you can get
a student request

ing and receiving electronic mail and to
engage in computer conferences.
"I use (MTS) to keep in touch with
people," LSA senior Aaron Bornstein
said. "It's also an easy way for me and

I

versity community
saideachstudent'srequestaccountiscred- my professors to keep in contact with-
ited a certain amount each month. The out me having to go to office hours."
money comes from your tuition dollars. Some professors require students to
Students basically use MTS for send- sign on toaclassconference wherecerta
'I use (MTS) to keep in touch with people. It's also
an easy way for me and my professors to keep in
contact without me having to go to office hours.'
-Aaron Bornstein
LSA senior

topics are discussed in an open forum.
Communications professor, Joan
Lowenstein, requires her 202 students
to periodically sign on to a confer-
ence where first amendment issues
~are discussed.
Some organiza-
Fy tions also sponsor
computer confer-
ences on which its
members can ac- -
\f ,cess and talk to@
other members of
the group.
For help with
using MTS, ITD
sponsors ahelp line.
Students can dial
764-HELPtospeak
to a computer con-
sultant that can an-
swer questions for

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan