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October 15, 1993 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1993-10-15

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, October 15, 1993 - 7

WHEN THE WALLS COME TUMBLIN' DOWN

,Woo to visit for address on
Asian Americans in politics

By SARAH KIINO
DAILY STAFF REPORTER
After the questionable police reac-
tion to the 1991 Rodney King beating,
then-City Councilmember Michael
Woo was the firstelected official to call
for the resignation of Los Angeles Po-
lice Chief Daryl Gates.
This is one example of Woo's com-
mitment to fighting for the rights of all
minorities in his native Los Angeles,
not only those of his own Chinese
American ethnic background.
Woo will be speaking tonight at 7
p.m. at Rackham.
LSA sophomore Jason Wang of the
Asian American Association said the
primary goal of the speech is to target
University sophomores and juniors, and
motivate them to become involved on
campus. However, he said the speech
is open to everyone who wants to at-
tend.
In 1985, Woobecame thefirst Asian
American ever elected to the Los An-
geles City Council. He served for two
terms and then this year ran in the
mayoral race.

'When the economy Is
bad, people look for
scapegoats. Racial
tensIons are worsened
when people are
worried about
unemployment.'
- Michael Woo
Woowasdefeatedby Richard Riordan,
but the race was close with Woo col-
lecting 46 percent of the vote.
An article in the New York Times
reported on the poor representation of
Asian Americans in American politics
- at both national and local levels. It
attributed the lack of Asian Americans
in politics to a variety of factors, in-
cluding scattered constituencies, alack
ofunityamong Asian American groups,
and a cultural tendency to avoid the
spotlight.
Woo said tonight he will speak in
regard to Asian Americans in politics,

including his own experiences in Los
Angeles,andmake suggestions about
how to further Asian Americans in
politics.
Woo said he also plans to address
the issue of increasing tensions be-
tween Asian Americans and African
Americans in Los Angeles, a problem
he attributes largely to the poor
economy in the area.
"When the economy is bad, people
look for scapegoats," Woo said. "Ra-
cial tensions are worsenedwhenpeople
are worried about unemployment."
Woo will not be arriving at the
University from California, but rather
Massachussetts, where he is teaching a
non-credit study group at HarvardUni-
versity on urban politics in Los Ange-
les and New York City.
The study group lasts until Decem-
ber, at which time Woo will return to
Los Angeles.
He said he does not have any con-
crete plans for when he returns to his
native city, but he is considering a run
for Secretary of State or another state-
wide office.

ANASTAIA ABANIKKI/DGty

The Midwest Construction crew works its building magic yesterday while constructing the new facade of Cottage Inn
Pizza.

Robin Hood rides again: Copy shops, students
express anger over, higher coursepack prices

*By JESSICA HOFFMAN
FOR THE DAILY
Inside the door of Michigan Docu-
ment Services (MDS) on Church Street,
customers are confronted with an as-
cension of colorful flyers ending in a
climactic list of the "Dirty Dozen,"
scandalizing the 12 powerful publish-
ers considered worse than medieval
tax collectors in their royalty assess-
*ments.
Publishers' enforcement of royal-
ties on coursepacks produced in copy
shops make their production more time-
consuming and expensive for students,
professors and copy shops.
MDS owner Jim Smith, the mod-
em-day Robinhoodofcoursepacks, said
he plans on seeking justice for copy
shops, students and all those who pur-
sue education.
Smith, who is accused of allegedly
neglecting to pay royalties to publish-
ers, claims reasonable or free royalty
rates on coursepack articles should be
granted based on their educational na-
ture.
"All we arecharging foris the copy-
ing services, it has nothing to do with
whether Earnest Hemingway wrote it
or the professor," he insisted.
( The royalties assigned by the pub-
lisherare tacked onto the original copy-
ing price, which means students pay

considerably more than the price of the
paper.
Some students avoid the high costs
by copying the required information
by going to the reserve desk at a library
or borrowing a friend's coursepack.,
LSA sophomore Avery Chi said, "I
didn't have a coursepack for an ac-
counting class and I needed the prac-
tice exam that was in it, but I wasn't
going to go out and buy a coursepack
for one practice exam. So I just copied
it from my friend."
When the price of an article's roy-
alty is considered costly, the professor
may decide to pull it out of the
coursepack to minimize the cost stu-
dents will have to pay.
However, it also minimizes the
amount of information available to the
student.
Another dangerous situation can
arise when professors require a
coursepackthatcontains theirownpub-
lished material within it, hence collect-
ing a percentage of the royalties.
On the other hand, professors who
write coursepacks collect little or no
money for the coursepacks themselves.
Charles Yocum, a biology profes-
sor who has published papers and has
authored many coursepacks said, "If I
produce intellectual property and then
if1 require that information in thecourse

that I am teaching, then I am profitting
from what I am teaching. That's not
fair."
Smith argues that coursepacks he
issues are for educational purposes and
shouldbeexemptfrom publisher's roy-
alties.
He bases this claim on a clause in
section 107 in the federal copyright
laws that states, "The fair use of a
copyrighted work... forpurposes such
as criticism, comment, news reporting,
teaching (including multiple copies),
scholarship, or research, is not an in-
fringement of copyright."
However, the above clause is the
exception to section 106, which stipu-
lates that the owner of a copyright has
the exclusive rights to "distribute cop-

ies ...of the coyrighted work to the
public by sale."
Many campus copy shops are dis-
gruntled by the royalties placed on
coursepacks with published articles.
"They called me a thief. They called
me a liar. One of them even called me
a Nazi!" Smith said when referring to
the publisher's reaction when he re-
fused to pay royalties.
His case is similar to one lost by
Kinko'sCopies, which ceased printing
coursepacks because of the difficulty
involved in producing them in obser-
vance with copyright laws.
Stacey Morgan, general managerat
Dollar Bill Copying, said, "It is like
punishing students who have to read
articles."

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The University of Michigan
School of Music

Sun. October 17
Michigan Chamber Players
Strauss: Kaiserwalz (arr. Schoenberg)
Villa-Lobos: Bachianas Brasilieras No. 6, with Leone Buyse, flute; and
Richard Beene, bassoon
Stravinsky: L'Histoire du Soldat , with Paul Kantor, violin; Stuart
Sankey, double bass; Deborah Chodacki, clarinet; Richard Beene,
bassoon; Charles Daval, trumpet; and Dennis Smith, trombone
School of Music Recital Hall, 8 p.m.

N

\.j i

State Plaza

socated on the
coloer of I. Slate
and Lboey. Enter
through the oGrant
Cofee Hore.

t ERTY

Tue. October 19
University Symphony and Philharmonia
Gustav Meier and Donald Schleicher, conductors
Schubert: Overture to Rosamunde
Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier- Suite
Moazrt: Overture to The Impresario
Schoenberg: Five Pieces for Orchestra
Hill Auditorium, 8 p.m.

Orchestras

Open 7 days a week 11am-10pm
;. 1201 S. University * 668-2445

STORE HOURS: Mon.-Sat. 9:30-6 Ri.'.V18:30; Sun. 12-5

Plan to attend... CareerPannin
L AW DAY
Wednesday, October 20, 1993
10:00 am - 2:00 pm
Michigan Union
*Meet with admissions officers from US law schools
*Investigate employment options available to

How SMET it is...
.*Camd.
+ Candy
s !uCtvffa A AImna a

Wed.-Sun. October 20-24
Musical Theatre Program
QUILT. A Musical Celebration
by Stockler, Morgan, Hubbard and Schak
John Schak, director: Jerry DePuit, musical director
Wednesday: Final Dress Rehearsal Benefit Performance (minimum
donation of $10) to benefit local AIDS service organizations
Thu.-Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m.
Tickets: $14, $10, and $6 (students)
Mendelssohn Theatre (764-0450)
Thu.-Sun. October 21-24
Department of Theatre and Drama
The Rogue's Trial by Ariano Suassuna
Jerald Schwiebert. director
Trueblood Theatre, Thu.-Sat. 8 p.m.. Sun. 2 p.m.
Tickets: S10, $6 for students (764-0450)
Fri. October 22 .
Guest Recital by N. Ravikiran
Karnetic music on the Indian instrument gottuvadham
School of Music Recital Hall. 8 p.m.

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