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October 15, 1993 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1993-10-15

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, October 15, 1993 - 5

*Community
to unite for
breast cancer
awareness
By MAGGIE WEYHING
FOR THE DAILY
The American Cancer Society's
statistics show that approximately
46,300 women and 300 men will die of
breast cancer this year. An estimated
2.5 million women are presently diag-
nosed with the disease. Another 1 mil-
lion have breast cancer, but are un-
aware.
A rally to promote awareness of
breast cancer will be held tomorrow at
10 am. in front of the Detroit Edison
Building. America's Challenge, Unit-
ing Against Breast Cancer, will spon-
sor the event.
"The whole concept began last year
in afew counties in Florida," explained
SandyEiler, breastcancersurvivorand
media spokesperson for Washtenaw
County.
The march will start at 10:30 am.
andcontinue down Main Street, to East
Liberty. ItwillendattheFederalBuild-
ing, where four speakers will be fea-
hred.
Dr. Dorit Adler, a radiologist and
member of President Clinton's Cancer
Panel Special Commision on Breast
Cancer will speak at the march's con-
clusion.
University alum AniMadarsz, chair
for America'sChallenge, willgive both
the opening and closing speeches.
Booths will be set up to provide
information on many aspects of breast
cancer, such as breast self-exam,
mammograms, the Tamoxifen study,
political advocacy and low-cost pap
smears.
Eiler stressed that student involve-
ment is very important in the rally.
"Statistically, weare seeing younger
and younger women who are being
diagnosed with brastcancer. Butalso,
many students have mothers or other
close family members who are suffer-
ing from the disease. This rally is really
a two-fold whammy. This is going to
be a knock down drag out rally."
Clinical Nurse for the breast care
center at the University Hospitals Lynne
Carpenter emphasized the importance
of young women between the ages of
18 and 25 to start learning the skills of
breast self examinations.
"Early detection of breast cancer
means a greater chance of not only
survival, but keeping both breasts as
-wll," she said.
"We need a lot of encourage-
ment and support for research and
money in the area. If we are able to
0 begin to get that support now, there
is a chance that the women who are
in their 20s now will have better
treatment when they reach the age
when they are seriously at risk,"
Carpenter added.
Eiler continued, "We have power
in numbers and this Saturday the state
that is usually referred to as the mitten
will be uniting to form a fist to fight
g breast cancer."

Students express
mixed opinions of
Inteflex changes

SUSAN ISAAK/Daily
Prof. Marlin Ristenbatt teaches Intelligent Vehicle Highway Systems Technologies to students simultaneously at the
University and at Michigan State University.
*doProfs. usevie technology t

teach class
By RONNIE GLASSBERG
FOR THE DAILY
Prof. Marlin Ristenbatt's class be-
gan yesterday like many others here at
the University, with a student raising
his hand to ask a question. The only
difference - the student was in East
Lansing.
Ristenbatt's class, Intelligent Ve-
hicle Highway Systems Technologies,
is one of four courses taught at the
University and another location simul-
taneously via videoconferencing.
Videoconferencing takes place in a
room that seats about 20 and has two
television monitors in view, one in the
front and one in the back. One monitor
shows the professor and students in
their classroom at the University and
the other monitor shows the "other"
students - seated in a classroom in
another city, or another country.
Two overhead microphones allow
students in the other location to partici-
pate in discussion. Using a remote con-
trol, the professor can switch to trans-
mit overheads for both classrooms to
see.
Ristenbatt said students can obtain
the same education through a
videoconferencing class as a regular
one with only a few minor drawbacks.
"If I don't hear any questions from
(Michigan State) I'm going to call on
them by name. I'm able to watch them
as well as the live class. That takes a
little discipline (because) it's easier to
look at the live class," he said.
Roberto Rastelli, a University
graduate student in mechanical engi-
neering, is one of the students in
Ristenbatt's class. He said, "It's no
problem for me because the professor
is here. I think (videoconferencing)

;es over phone
will work out, but I would definitely bers from IS1
prefer to have a professor in the class." first master's
The University videoconferencitig odology using
is operated by Network Systems of the program is a
University Information Technology tween the Uni
Division (ITD) and it uses compressed Maryland, an
video through 12regular phone lines to land survey f
operate. Videoconferencing classes A five-yea
transmit data at speeds of 768,000 bits the National S
per second and the videoappears slower the master'sx
than television. prove the tech
"We've had a lot of people express statistical woi
interest," said Mary Cochrane, a repre- Some Un
sentative from Network Systems Tele- cated to Col
communications Service, who oper- program, but
ates the equipment during classes. teach parts of
"What you need is another, location Arbor.
where students would want to take a A secondN
class not already offered at their uni- is scheduled to
versity. They're not duplicating any ter. This loca
classes," she said. equipment as
Cochrane said the system is basi- land, which wi
cally very good, but problems can arise. control the ca
"It's just a telephone line - you can tion, which no
always run into problems," she said. Wednesdi
However, when problems do arise, they ness School s
can generally be fixed quickly. master's degr
Even with that technology, Strategy forso
Ristenbatt said he does not know his traffic enginee
students at Michgan State (MSU) as with an MSUI
well as those at the University. tems anticipa
"I can improve on that by going guage course
there physically. They recommend tween the Un
going to the opposite end every fourth In additio
or fifth lecture. I think that's probably videoconferec
reasonable," he said. Department h
Tuesday, Ristenbatt will go to Lan- researching p
sing for the first time. Ristenbatt
The first videoconferencing classes would allowu
at the University began this summer in one particul
with the University of Maryland "There's a
through the Institute for Social Re- course up the
search (ISR). traffic enginee
This year University faculty mem- it's a mutual 1

lines
R will teach the nation's
program in survey meth-
g videoconferencing. The
a cooperative effort be-
dversity, the University of
nd Westat, Inc., a Mary-
irm.
ar, $4.1 million grant from
Science Foundation funds
program in order to im-
hnical skills of the federal
rk force.
iversity staff have relo-
1ege Park, Md., for this
other ISR faculty will
f the program from Ann
videoconferencing room
oopen at ISR next semes-
ation will use the same
the University of Mary-
vill allow the professor to
meras at the remote loca-
ow cannot be done.
ay, the University Busi-
tarted a videoconference
ee program in Corporate
tudents in Hong Kong. A
wring class is also offered
professor. Network Sys-
tes that by January, lan-
s will be exchanged be-
iversity and MSU.
n to Network Systems'
cing room, the Physics
has set up a center for its
urposes.
t said videoconferencing
universities to specialize
ular area.
a barter. We're sending a
re and they're sending a
ering course this way and
benefit," he said.

By MONA QURESHI
DAILY STAFF REPORTER
First-year Inteflex student Aesha
Stimage said she's happy she joined
the LSA pre-med program called
Inteflex when she did.
Stimage fears that major changes
beginning with the 1994 entering class
of Inteflex may make it less worth-
while.
Inteflex is a highly-selective medi-
cal program that places students on the
medical school track immediately after
high school integrating the undergradu-
ate and graduate education.
The new version of Inteflex will
stretch the program from seven years
to eight. Furthermore, students will be
obligated to take the Medical College
Admissions Test (MCAT).
Appending these requirements,
however, makes Inteflex seem like the
average undergraduate and medical
school education that non-Inteflex stu-
dents have, Stimage said.
"It kind of defeats the purpose of
Inteflex. It doesn't help to distinguish
us from other pre-med students," she
said.
She added that she would not have
felt the same about applying to Inteflex
if these changes had been in effect.
"I would still have applied, but it
wouldn't have made as big of a differ-
ence if I didn't get in," Stimage said,
indicating that she would have already
been accepted intoLSA andcouldhave
maintained a pre-med goal.
But Inteflex staff members said
there are legitimate reasons for the
changes.
Inteflex Co-Director Dr. Alphonse
Burdi said the program is designed to
serve as amodel for the future of medi-
cal education. Tagging the MCAT to
the program, he said, is just another
step in the process of becoming a doc-
tor, like the required National Board
Exams that potential doctors take be-
fore beginning clinical work.
Penny Morris, a counselor for LSA
pre-med and Inteflex students, said
extending the time for schooling opens
opportunities to students, including the
pursuit of a second concentration.
A second concentration could serve
as a way for students to study social
skills and social responsibilities neces-
sary to practicing medicine, Morris said.
In turn, the University Medical
school may produce moreprimary care
physicians whose services are requested
under the new Clinton health care plan.
With the training of more primary
care physicians, federal funding for the
Medical school program would in-
crease. ButMorrissaid finances arenot
the only factors influencing the pro-
gram changes.
"It's not a threat. That's just where
the money is going to be," she said.
Second-yearInteflex studentVarisa
Boriboon said she sympathizes with

CHANGES IN INTEFLEX
Orgsnizrs say ~theyy are
tl nning major t3 ags tob
imtplemted i t inefiex
prorage a cinh byeecstie th
medicalshroran th at ha
thy'e nts podn the tpriayc
Staring wt ned, he said.
phstcants acwl deehc n h
prne humne t r compnte
Thake heMiedcal ors.g
Fistyar sin telst dnta
the new revisions. "I sense that a lot of
the changes are coming beause the
Medical school is facing the reality that
they're not producing the primary cae
physicians we need," she said.
Boriboon added that primary cae
physicians acknowledge ethics and the
importance of humane treatment more
than specialized doctors.
First-year Inteflex student Heather
Bunting agreed with Boriboon to an
extent. She said while she likes the idea
of a four-year program, she doesn't
understand why students will have to
take the MCAT.
She thought medical school was a
sure-thing once she was accepted to
Inteflex.
But Morris said although Inteflex
students are chosen for their academic
abilities, they are not guaranteed ad-
mission to the University's School of
Medicine.
"There are still people now who
mess up (in coursework and don't go
on," she said.
Burdi explained that space in the
University Medical school will con-
tinue to be set aside for Inteflex stu-
dents, but MCAT scores will be con-
sidered in the process.
He also said that Inteflex students
will still not have to apply to medical
school under the new changes.
Officials acknowledged that some
appealing features of Inteflex are being
eliminated and that the program may
not appear as atractive to students wish-
ing to join seven-year medical pro-
grams.
But the University is optimistic
about serving as a prototype for the
future of medical school programs
around the country.
"That's a great idea," said Luan
Phan, the president of the Inteflex Stu-
dent Council and a third-year student.
"The program is designed to look to-
ward the future in terms of looking into
preventative care and primary care
medicine, which may be overall very
good for the country."

Censored art exhibit returns to 'U' Law School

By BRYN MICKLE
DAILY STAFF REPORTER
For two days this weekend, the
University Law School will showcase
prostitutes, pornography stars and sexu-
ally explicit art - all free of charge.
As an added bonus, Law School
Dean Lee Bollinger will debate an
American Civil Liberties Union
(ACLU) attorney on issues of free
speech and offensive materials.
Today, the Law School will rein-
stall Carol Jacobsen's art exhibit,

"Porn'im'ag'ery: Picturing Prosti-
tutes," for a two-day showing.
The agreement to show the uncen-
sored multi-media exhibit comes one
year after the exhibit spurred national
controversy.
During a University-sponsored
conference on academic perspectives
on prostitution last year, a 15-minute
video segment of the presentation was
deemed offensive and removed by
law school student organizers.
Jacobsen, a local artist, and the

ACLU threatened the University with
legal action for copyright violations
of her exhibit.
In response, Law School Prof.
Catharine MacKinnon accused the the
ACLU of defaming the University
through press releases.
To keep the issue from being de-
cided in a courtroom, the Law School
agreed to reinstall Jacobsen's exhibit
and sponsor a forum on sexuality and
freedom of expression.
Bollinger will debate tommorrow

Marjorie Heins, ACLU attorney and
director of the ACLU's Arts Censor-
ship Project.
Heins, who recently awarded the
Law School with the dubious title of
leading censor in America, will ar-
gue with Bollingerabout free speech
and the students' rights to control
material in a student-sponsored fo-
rum.
The two-day event will run from 9
a.m. -6p.m. today and tomorrow in the
Law School's Hutchins Hall.
The Michigan Daily.

LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY AT THE U OF M
INVITES YOU TO ATTEND
FREE SPECIAL SUNDAY EVENTS
DR. ABE CACERES
E SIC'IANJC'O I'S IR, LT I INO N1UtSCOx(,XIS
WILL COORDINATI ;TE11 F W .OWING ACIVIT IIvS:
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17
10:00 A M GOSPEL MASS
2:00-5:00 PM WORKSHOP- "I LIKE YOUR SHOES: THE
PROBLEMS AND PROMISES OF CROSS-CULTURAL
EXPERIENCE." A MUSICAL WORKSHOP FOR CHURCH
MUSICIANS AND WORSHIP LEADERS.
AT
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN CHURCH
801 S. FOREST (AT HILL)
ANN ARBOR, MI 48104
call 668-7622 for details

Friday
U Chinese Christian Fellowship,
meeting, DANA Building,
Room 1040, 7:30 p.m.
U Korean Campus Crusade for
Christ, fellowship meeting,
Campus Chapel, 1236
Washtenaw Ct., 8 p.m.
O Ninjutsu Club, IM Building,
Wrestling Room, 6:30 p.m.
Q Psychology Academic Peer Ad-
vising, walkins welcome or call
for appointment, 747-
'2711 WlIt l ..r..gA r mr Vl2

U Tae Kwon Do Club, everyone
welcome, CCRB, room 2275,
7-9 p.m.
U Weekly Bridge Game, Dupli-
cate Bridge Club, Michigan
Union, Tap Room, 7:30 p.m.

Saturday
U Academic Job Search Sympo-
slum, sponsored byCareerPlan-
ing and Placement, Rackham,
11:30-5 p.m.
U Converting our Economy from
Defense to DOmestic Priori-

331 Thompson.
Sunday
o Alpha Phi Omega, pledge meet-
ing, MLB, Lecture Room 1, 6
p.m.; chapter meeting, 7 p.m.
U Christian Life Church Sunday
Service, School of Education,
Schorling Auditorium, 11 a.m.
U Phi Sigma Pi, general meeting,
East Quad, 52 Green Lounge
7:30 p.m.
U PAC Week Workshops, spon-
enr- h...a Ahtol 7 t a-

I

"I

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