100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 08, 1993 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1993-10-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


annual
mage tonight

i
i
ai
1

Feld Ballets
bring tour to
Power Center

12

f v4 1

* Yr

One hundred three years of editorial freedom
1 rbrFrda.Otbr 19 al

'we started this
mission for the right
reasons and we are
going to finish it in the
right way. If we stay a
Short while longer and
do the right thing, we
have a reasonable
chance of cooling the
embers.'
-President Clinton

Clinton sends additional troops to Somalia

WASHINGTON (AP) - Presi-
dent Clinton told the American people
yesterday he was sending 1,700 more
troops, heavy armor and naval fire-
power to Somalia to "finish the work
we set out to do." He pledged to end
the deployment within six months.
"We started this mission for the
right reasons and we are going to
finish it in the right way," Clinton
said in a nationally televised address.
"If we stay a short while longer and do
the right thing, we have a reasonable

chance of cooling the embers."
Clinton said the U.S. force needed
to be expanded to protect troops al-
ready there and to make sure humani-
tarian missions continued. Counting
troops offshore, the reinforcements
would double the American deploy-
ment to more than 10,000.
If America turned and ran because
of the rising death toll, around the
world "aggressive thugs and terror-
ists would conclude the best way to
change our policy is to kill our people,"

Clinton declared.
He said that he wanted to call the
troops home as soon as possible and
was sending diplomat Robert Oakley
to Africa to try to find a diplomatic
settlement. He said it might take "up
to six months" to complete the mis-
sion but he hoped to wrap it up before
then.
Clinton, sitting at his Oval Office
desk, said the 4,700 U.S. troops al-
ready in Somalia would be reinforced
with 1,700 Army ground troops, 104

tanks and other armored vehicles and,
offshore, an aircraft carrier and other
naval forces carrying 3,600 Marines.
Clinton also issued a stern warn-
ing to Somalis holding at least one
American serviceperson captive. He
declared the United States would hold
them "strictly responsible for our sol-
diers' well being. We expect them to
be well treated and we expect them to
be released."
He said he did not want to person-
alize the conflict, and never men-

tioned by name Mohamed Farrah
Aidid, the fugitive Somali warlord
whose forces are blamed for the deaths
of American and other troops in So-
malia.
The speech was critical to gaining
support from a public horrified by
photographs of a dead American sol-
dier being dragged through the streets
of Mogadishu and a videotaped inter-
rogation of a downed helicopter pilot.
Clinton acknowledged the "anger
See CLINTON, Page 2

'Blue goes for third in a row

By KEN SUGIURA
DAILY FOOTBALL WRITER
Defeat tastes bad. Huge defeats
taste even worse. And how are con-
secutive blowouts from your archrival
on the palate?
I*How does coffee grounds a la bot-
tom of the garbage can sound?
If they haven't had that particular
culinary concoction, the Spartans of
Michigan State have had something
similar. Nothingwould tickle the taste
buds better than a Spartan victory
tomorrow.
That is the scenario as ninth-ranked
Michigan (3-1 Big Ten, 1-0 overall)
,ines up against Michigan State (2-1,
-0) for the 86th time. It is time once
again to throw out the records, board
up the windows and hide the children.
Bragging rights are on the line.
This time, the game may actually
be close.
"You're gonna see two teams that
won't give up," Michigan cornerback
Alfie Burch said. "They have a great
team this year."
0 Last season, Michigan cruised to
an easy 35-10 victory, led by tailback
Tyrone Wheatley's 172 rushing yards.
Two years ago in Spartan Stadium,
the Wolverines mashed the Spartans,
45-28, behind two-touchdown efforts
from Desmond Howard and Jesse
New cab
service
takes 'U'
for a ride
&y MICHELE HATMY
'DAILY STAFF REPORTER
Walking alone across campus at
night can be pretty eerie.
Fortunately, groups both on and
off campus exist to provide an alter-
native to solo treading.
In addition to the usual fare of
SafeWalk, NorthWalk, Night Ride,
Night Owl and the Ride Home, a new
service has been created by Yellow
dab Co. to help students get from one
place to another safely.
For a flat rate of $2, the new ser-
vice, called M-Ride, will transport up
to four students at a time anywhere
within an imaginary triangular bound-,
ary composed of the Michigan Union,
the hill dorms and the Rock. It oper-
ates between 7 p.m. and 3 a.m.
"We were interested in offering a
#pecific service to University of
Michigan students," said John Croel,
general manager of Yellow Cab Co.
"A lot of students know us and call us
regularly anyway, but we realized that
a discounted fare would interest more
students."

MR

Fraternity to run game ball
to State stadium for charity

3:34 gp.
Johnson.
But this year; the Spartans just
might get their chance at revenge. For
the first time since 1983, Michigan
State heads into its contest with Michi-
gan with a winning record.
Granted, a 2-1 record with victo-
ries over Kansas and Central Michi-
gan does not strike fear the way that
maybe a sparrow might, but it bears
consideration that the three teams
Michigan has beaten thus far have an
underwhelming 6-7 combined record.
In their first victory over Central
Michigan after two embarrassing de-
feats, the Spartans compiled 584 yards
of total offense, 390 of them from
twin 195-yard rushing efforts from
tailbacks Craig Thomas and Duane
See FOOTBALL, Page 9

By MICHELLE FRICKE
DAILY STAFF REPORTER
The official game ball used in
tomorrow's rivalry against Michigan
State will pass through the hands of
more than 40 men and women even
before kickoff.
As part of a long-standing tradi-
tion, Sigma Nu fraternity members
from both Michigan and MSU will be
running the football to East Lansing
tonight to raise money for United
Way.
University Sigma Nu vice-presi-
dent Mark Hoffman, coordinator of
the event, predicts proceeds will reach
nearly $5,000. The money will be
divided between the Capital Area
United Way and Washtenaw United
Way.
University Sigma Kappa sorority
members and Alpha Chi Omega mem-
bers from MSU will stretch out and
head west on the 70-mile trek as well.
The team will leave Ann Arbor at
about 11:30 p.m. The men and women
will take turns running on Michigan's
back roads, striving to log just a few

miles each. Vans full of supplies will
direct the runners to the 50-yard line.
"I'm sure the men and women
involved are excited about doing it,"
Hoffman said. "It should be fun, al-
though it will get long and tiring along
the way."
Expected time of arrival: 7 a.m.
Saturday.
After crashing for a few sweet
hours, the runners will meet a police
escort at 11 a.m. outside Lansing city
limits. They will proceed to the MSU
student union for a short break before
continuing on to Spartan Stadium.
Live from mid-field, the fraternity
members will present the game ball to
the rival university presidents -
University President James
Duderstadt and MSU President-des-
ignate Peter McPherson.
Local businesses, such as Little
Caesar's, and friends and family of
the runners have pledged their finan-
cial support to United Way.
"It's an annual event falling dur-
ing our annual fundraising campaign,
See CHARITY, Page 2

MICHELLE GUY/Daily
Wolverine junior tailback Tyrone Wheatley continues to make his case for
the Heisman Trophy this weekend against Michigan State.

A WING AND A PRAYER

LGMBi pride week to
educate and celebrate

By MIKE NEWMAN
FOR THE DAILY
In a celebration of gay pride and awareness,
the Lesbian Gay Male Bisexual Programs Of-
fice (LGMBPO) will kick off a week of pro-
grams and parties.
Pride-Awareness-Commitment (PAC) week
will start with a Club Fabulous dance Saturday
at St. Andrews Church and continue with a
series of educational activities throughout the
week.
"(One) goal is that I hope people who are
closeted will feel encouraged to consider com-
ing out of the closet at some time in the future,"
said Jim Toy, co-coordinator of the LGMBPO.
Toy said another goal is to inform people
about and muster support for the Michigan
Campaign for Human Dignity, a grassroots
effort responding to proposed legislation unfa-
vorable to the LGMBi community.
The kickoff rally - scheduled for Monday
at 7p.m. on the steps of Rackham--will feature
MC Billi Gordon, a stand-up comedian and
former LGMBPO staff member. Music and
speakers from many groups, including ACT-

UP and The Michigan Campaign for Human
Dignity will also participate.
The rest of the week will be filled with
workshops, lectures and discussions to address
needs of the LGMBi community.
Highlights include a workshop by Taylor-
Arne Wentworth called, "Women Writing Nov-
els: Finding Your Feminist Voice." Poetry read-
ings will be held by Terri Jewell, an award
winning African-American lesbian-feminist,
and Gordon will give a workshop on "Gays in
the Hollywood Film Buisiness: Making It it
Hollywood and Maintaining Your Gay Iden-
tity."
Event organizers expect 250-300 people to
participate in the rally, and Toy said he hopes
the whole University community utilizes the
rest of the events.
The celebration week follows a big victory
for the University LGMBi community. At the
September meeting of the University Board of
Regents, an amendment was added to the by-
laws prohibiting discrimination on the basis of
sexual orientation.
See WEEK, Page 2

ANASTASIA BANICKI/Daily
U-M Flyers Dennis Tokarski and Robin Baron remove a Cessna 152 out of the Diag at 4 a.m.
yesterday. The plane was being used to promote the organization.

Minority rep. Robinson learns from, teaches students

By SARAH KIINO
DAILY STAFF REPORTER
The growth and change -both
mental and physical - Barbara

of being kept posted on the lives of
her students long after they have left
the University.
"It's great when they call you and

cessful in their pursuit of a University
degree.
"This encompasses many things,
social, financial, time management,

groups, as opposed to interaction be-
ing restricted to one's own ethnic
group.
"The true essense of

e. !

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan