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October 07, 1993 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1993-10-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily - Thursday, October 7, 1993- 5

Programming Council
funds group activities

EAT YOUR VEGTABLES

Clinton forecasts higher
auto exports under NAFTA

By RONNIE GLASSBERG
ORTHE. DAILY
Student groups looking to bring
interesting speakers tocampusorspon-
ocr a cultural fair may have trouble
collecting enough cash toorganizetheir
ButcamnpusgroUPSplanning toopen
activities to a large percentage of the
University community willhaveagood
chanceof receiving financial help from
the Student Affairs Programming
Council.
The council, funded by the Office
of the Vice President for Student Af-
fairs, provides financial relief to stu-
dent group programs it deems educa-
onally worthwhile.
"What we try to do is to look at
everything outside the classroom and
how we can make that connect with the
classroom experiences," said Beth
Adler, who chairs the council.
But limited funds mean the council
cannot grant money to every student-
actvity. Campus groups most ap-
jy farhelp -and prove that their
grogram will impact the largerUniver-
sity community.
"What this programming council
does is recognize that there are a lot of
events or programming ideas out there
that can enhance our educational ob-
jective," Adler said.
Studentgroupsmustapplyforfund-
ing at the Office of the Dean of Stu-
dentsl flour weeks before an event is
,sheduled. The council meets twice a
onth to evaluate applications and
decide if it wants to fund the project
and how much money the group will
ftceive. The council will meet for the
first time Oc.14.-
A total of $30,000 is available for
siudentprogram funding this year, said
Dodger Wolf of the Office of the Vice
PresidentofStudent Affairs. Programs
that are open to the entire University
&bmmunity and affect student life are
given priority for funding. In addition,
p eference is given to those that pro-
mote cultural diversity.
"When you look at a university,
you look'at what happens in the class-
room, but ... part of getting an educa-
tion is doing out of classroom activi-
ties," Adler said.
But all out-of-classroom activities
t not educational, according to the
1andais outlined by the council.
The council will not fund publica-
tns, programs for academic credit or
class projects, social programs, off
campus programs, religious programs,
r programs that promote a political
agenda.
Between 12 and 15 members -
chosen from organizations or depart-
mients with a great deal of program-
ning - serve on the council. Half of
the members are students.
University graduate Jason Gamel,
who works for the Student Organiza-
tionDevelopmentCenterandwillserve
GUEST STUDENTS WELCOME
Recruiting for 1994 Spring Term
May 5- June 18,1994
OTTAWA POLITICAL
INTERNSHIP
in the
CANADIAN HOUSE OF COMMONS

Offered by the Political Science
Department at the University of
Michigan-Dearbom Campus
6 hours of transferable
Poitical Science credit
(Pol. Science 494-496)
Dr. Helen M. Graves, Director
of the Canadian Intemship
WILL BE ON CAMPUS
Wednesday, October 6
ww
Thursday, October T
3:30 - 5:00 pm
Political Science
Graduate Student Lounge
6th Floor Haven Hall

'There are a lot of
events or programming
ideas out there that
can enhance our
educational objective,'
- Beth Adler
Chair of the Student
Affairs Programing
Council
on the council for the second time this
year, said his experience in student
groups makes him alert to the need for
financial help.
"What it comes down to is alot of
people have great ideas. The problem
is there's not that many ways for an
organization to raise funds," he said.
If a group is unsuccessful with the
Student Affairs Pgramming Coun-
cil, itmay looktotheMichigan Student
Assembly or the Office of Academic
Multicultural Initiatives (OAMI) for
funding.
Jacob Stem, budgetpriorities chair
forMSA, said theassemblyhas $56,000
available to fund student group events
this year.
He said the basic criteria for fund-
ing is "how many students will be
affected by this event or project," but
added that every group requesting
money from MSA gets some.
OAMI- with amore specific goal
in mind -provides funding for pro-
grams that "expand and enrich the
University's mission for
multiculturalism." The application
process begins next Friday.
To receive funding from any of
these organizations, a student group
must be registered through MSA and
have a University-funded student or-
ganization account number with the
StudentOrganization AccountService.

WASHINGTON (AP) - The
Clinton administration released a new
reportTuesday contending thatthe auto
industry would reap $2 billion in in-
creased exports in
the first year after
passage of a free-
trade agreement
with Mexico.
Thereport,pre-
pared by the Com-
merceDepartment,
was the first in a
series of 37 planned industry-by-in-
dustry studies ordered by the Clinton
administration.
NAFTA would create the world's
largest free trade zone by eliminating
virtually all barriers to trade among the
UnitedStates, MexicoandCanadaover

the next 15 years.
The report estimated that exports of
American-made autos and parts would
increase by $1 billion and exports of
heavy trucks and buses would rise by
another$1 billion in the firstyearunder
NAFTA.
Critics charged that the Commerce
Department report relied on question-
able economic assumptions and on es-
timates from the auto industry, which
is lobbying heavily for passage of the
agreement.
Rep. William Ford (D-Mich) a
NAFTA opponent, cited a congres-
sional study that employment in auto
parts factories in Mexicohad grown by
120,000 in the past 11 years while auto
parts factories in the United States were
losing 154,000 jobs.

Eastern Michigan University
p r e s e n ts
C I~g&;a ble gQlaa + tm

Mary, originally from Poland, arranges her vegtebales MARY KOUKHAsB Daiy
yesterday at her stand in a local farmer's market.

also featuring: i
Gumbo!
Kiss Me Screaming
Mustard Plug
Bowen Field House

October 8th
8:00 pm
Tickets: $15.00

For more information, call 487-3045

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