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September 29, 1993 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1993-09-29

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The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, September 29, 1993 - 3

U' works to
.aid desegregation
in South Af rica

By DAVID RHEINGOLD
DAILY STAFF REPORTER
When Charles Moody visited South
Africa in 1991, the segregated,
underfunded schools reminded him of
a not-so-distant time in U.S..history.
"When I got off the plane in South
Africa, it was almost like I was in a time
warp, back in Louisiana in the'30s and
'40s," recalled Moody, who was born
and raised in Baton Rouge.
"These were the kinds of things that
intrigued me to want to get involved in
SouthAfricaand do something, make a
difference," he said.
In July, Moody became executive
director of the University's South Af-
rica Initiative.
Moody spoke about the newly-cre-
ated program, a desegregation effort
aimed at strengthening South Africa
schools and universities, during a lec-
ture in West Engineering yesterday.

The initiative's goal is to form
bridges between the University and
schools in South Africa, Moody said.
One component of the program is
student, faculty and administrator ex-
changes.,
Currently, three students from South.
Africa are attending the University
through the initiative.
The program also sponsored an in-
ternational forum last month that drew
about 90 scholars to the University.
Other goals are to send books and
journals toSouthAfrica, toworkclosely
with school administrators in South
Africa, and to establish a University
satellite office there.
Moody, who recently served asvice
provost for minority affairs, emphr-
sized that if enough people getinvolved,
they can make a difference in shaping
post-apartheid South Africa.
"It's something that I really wanted

South Africa Initiative participants hoping to conquer segregation gather for a photograph.

to do," he said. "Last year, on my 60th
birthday, IrealizedIdon'thaveasmany
years in front of me as I have behind
me. So if I want to do something, I've
got to do it now."
But spreading academicknowledge
is not enough, said Moody, who be-
lieves Blacks need a strong mentor-

type network..
"If you don'thave amentor or spon-
sor, I don'tcarehow smart you are, how
many As you've got ... your career
mobility is limited," he said.
Randy Strickland, a third-year
graduate student in political science
who attended yesterday's lecture, said

he hopes the University will make the
initiative a high priority.
Strickland said he hopes other U.S.
schools create similar efforts, especially
historically Black universities, "because
I can't think of any other institutions
that would have as much relevant
knowledge and experience."

Clinton stands by plans for health care reform

UCongressional
hearings for Hillary
Rodham Clinton's
"proposed health care
reforms began
yesterday
WASHINGTON (AP) - Hillary
* Rodham Clinton met a barrage of
questions from doubting lawmakers
yesterday as she opened Congress'
hearings on the administration's
health care plan.
Standing her ground, she told
them, "Americans can no longer wait
for health care reform."
Mrs. Clinton led off as the key
witness before the House Ways and
Means Committee, telling lawmak-
ers that details of the plan will be
debated but action must follow.
An overhaul of the $900 billion
system will require sacrifice from
all Americans, she said.
"The upcoming debate is not
about any one set of citizens but all
of us," Mrs. Clinton said.
The task is urgent, she said. "As
we sit here today, literally hundreds
and hundreds of Americans will lose
their health care."
After the two-hour morning hear-
'ing, Mrs. Clinton headed to the
House Energy and Commerce Com-
mittee.
Chair Dan Rostenkowski, (D-Ill.)

"We could go on, but my red
light is on," Mrs. Clinton said, not-
ing she was out of time as she tried
to douse Rep. Sam Gibbons' con-
cerns about how the Clinton plan
would trim Medicare costs.
Rostenkowski said he was con-
cerned about the impact on busi-
nesses back in Chicago; Rep. Pete
Stark, (D-Calif.) who heads the
Medicare subcommittee that will
play a key role, sounded off about
putting states in charge, complain-
ing his own governor has no interest
in participating.
Rep. Jim McDermott (D-Wash.)
who heads the "single payer" fac-
tion of lawmakers pushing for a gov-
ernment-run system, wanted to know
how the government could force a
self-employed person to pay premi-
ums.
What guarantees are there a con-
AP PHOTO tractor making $22,000 a year try-
ing to support a family could pay his
$4,000 family premium? McDermott
asked.
embers Mrs. Clinton tried to assure
ded by McDermott that the contractor would
to law- get a small-business subsidy and tax
ars. break.
g state- The incentives would be there
ourself for him to get coverage for his fam-
ily, she said.
ns hear- Small businesses will in the end
t mem- be better off because they'll get the
minute. same breaks as large companies,

Mrs. Clinton said.
A tobacco-state lawmaker, Rep.
Jim Bunning, (R-Ky.) complained
about singling out tobacco for a tax
increase.
He suggested products high in
sugar, caffeine and cholesterol be
hit, too, on grounds that they can
cause health problems.
Mrs. Clinton noted that tobacco
is considered unhealthful, even in
moderation.
"There is no free lunch," she
said, and told Bunning, in a remark
that brought some chuckles, "If there
is a way to ever come up with a tax
on the substances you just men-
tioned, we'll be glad to look at it."
In the Energy and Commerce
Committee, members got five min-
utes, and went into more detail.
Rep. Thomas Bliley, (R-Va.)
whipped out charts and asked how
the administration's plan could keep
medical costs to 1 percent more than
inflation, when costs have been ris-
ing 4 percent above that in Canada
and Great Britain.
"Mr. Bliley, that's an excellent
question, and I'm glad you asked
that," she said.
Rep. Bill Archer, (R-Texas) the
Ways and Means' ranking Republi-
can, said he was concerned that the
White House plan would fatten gov-
ernment bureaucracy and doubted
the wisdom of trying out such a
huge change without a pilot run.
"Health reform isn't a product to
be packaged and sold like a toaster
on the Home Shopping Network,"
Archer said.

Forum
to pit P.C..
against
fidsp
By LAURIEyOSWALD
FOR THE DAILY
The first annual Michigan
Conservative Conference begins
today.
The conference, sponsored by
the University College Republi-
cans and Michigan Students for
America, seeks to educate stu-
dents on traditional American
values. .
The issues ofmulticulturalism
and political correctness and how
these teachings attack fundamen-
tal American values and origing
will be discussed.
The conference will also ad*
dress how proponents o
multiculturalism and political
correctness try to control debate
in the classroom by limiting free
speech.",
Christian Cal, an LSA junio
and a supporter of both sponsor.
ing organizations, said the con-
ference is important for students
because many often feel they can
not speak up in class for fear o
penalty if their statements differ:
from the accepted stances on
multiculturalism or political cor,
rectness.
Cali said the conference i
open to all students but is par
ticularly geared toward first- and
second-year students. }
He explained this objectiv
by saying the limiton free speeclit
in the classroom is often felt whein
students first arrive on campus.
Nationally-syndicated colum-
nist Samuel Francis commences
the conference's events this
evening at 7 p.m. in the
Henderson Room of the Michi-
gan League with a lecture en-
titled, "Multiculturalism and Po-
litical Correctness at the Univer-
sity."
Ron Robinson, president of
the Young America's Foundation
- a national conservative group
- will speak on "Student Rights
in the Classroom" at 7 p.m. in the
Modern Languages Building lec-
ture room 1 or 2.
The final event of the confer-
ence, a debate between former
U.S. Rep. William Dannemeyer
and Stephen Dresch, will take
place Friday night at 7 p.m. in the
Henderson Room of the Michi-
gan League.
The topic of the debate is "Did
America's Founding Fathers
separate Judaeo-Christian values
from state?"

First lady Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks before the House Ways and Means
Committee on Capitol Hill yesterday.

cracked that "in the very near fu-
ture, the president will be known as
your husband. 'Who's that fellow?
That's Hillary's husband."'
And Rep. Richard Neal, (D-
Mass.) joked that she knew all the
answers and should go on the quiz
show "Jeopardy!" in her next life.
At the Energy and Commerce
hearing, Rep. Cliff Stearns, (R-Fla.)

noted that many Cabinet m
show up to testify surroun
aides who whisper responsesI
makers' questions in their ea
"You're making a winning
ment by showing up all by y
at that table," he said.
In the huge Ways and Mean
ing room, Rostenkowski kep
bers' questions to within onen

Corrections:
Tim Chang and Steve Sumida are performing in "Yankee Dawg You Die." This was incorrectly reported in Monday's
Daily. Pamela St. John is the cheer team advisor/alumni coordinator. Claudia Perez is a captain of the cheerleading
squad. This was incorrectly reported in Monday's Daily. Kelley Barton of Kelley's Copies said her store complies
with copyright laws. This was incorrectly reported in yesterday's Daily.

Student groups
a American Civil Liberties
Union, chapter mass meeting,
Hutchins Hall, Room 116, 7
p.m.
U Black Action Movement Panel,
sponsored by the Black Student
Union, Stockwell Hall, Blue
Carpet Lounge, 7 p.m.
U Hillel, Sukkot Services, Ortho-
dox, Hillel, 7 p.m.
U Hindu Students Council, mass
meeting and discussion, Michi-
gan Union, Pond Room, 8 p.m.
U Lutheran Campus Ministry,
Bible Study/discussion, Jesus
through the Centruries, 6 p.m.;
evening prayer, 7 p.m.; 801 S.
Forest
U Ninjutsu Club, IM Building,
Wrestling Room, 7:30 p.m.
U Rainforest Action Movement,
weekly meeting, Dana Build-.
ing, Room 1046, 7 p.m.
U Research Club, The Crisis in
U.S. Healthcare, presented by
John Forsyth, Rackham Hall,
West Conference Room, 7:30
p.m.
U Rowing Team, novice practice,
boat house, men 3, 4, 5 p.m.;
women 3:30, 4:30, 5:30 p.m.
U Saint Mary Student Parish,
Catholic Student Fellowship, 7
p.m.; centering prayer, 7 p.m.,

331 Thompson St.
U Senior Pictures, sponsored by
the Michiganensian, Michigan
Union, Wolverine Room, 8
a.m.-4:30 p.m.
U Shorin-Ryu Karate-Do Club,
everyone welcome, CCRB,
Room 2275, 8:30-9:30 p.m.
U Tae Kwon Do Club, beginners
and other new members wel-
come, CCRB, Room 2275, 7-9
p.m.
U U-M Students of Objectivism,
kick-off videos, Modern Lan-
guage Building, Room B 120, 7
p.m.
U Undergraduate Philosophy
Club, meeting, Angell Hall,
Room 2220, 6 p.m.
Events
p Conservative Conference,
Samuel Francis on
Multiculturalism and Political
Correctness at the University,
Michigan League, Henderson
Room, 7 p.m.
U Kempf House Brown Bag
Lunch Series, The Aesthetic
Movement, Janet Kreger, 312
S. Division, 12 noon
U Latest 'Dimpressions': Notes
on Travel through Eurasia,
sponsored by the CREES Brown

Bag Lunch Series, Ronald Suny,
Lane Hall, Commons Room, 12
noon
Q New Excavations at Sepphoris,
lecture by Prof. Ehud Netzer
sponsored by the Kelsy Mu-
seum of Archaeology and the
Interdeparmental Program in
Classical Art and Archaeology,
Angell Hall, Room 2009, 7:30
p.m.
Q Probing Absoption and Reac-
tivity at Well-Ordered Sur-
face Planes of Platinum
Single-Crystal Electrodes,
analytical chemistry seminar,
Carol Korzeniewski, Chemis-
try Building, Room 1300,4p.m.
Student services
Q Career Planning & Placement,
CIGNA presentation, Michigan
Union, Welker Room, 6-8 p.m.;
Salomon Brothers presentation,
Michigan Union, Pendleton
Room, 7-9 p.m.
Q Psychology Academic Peer
Advising, walk-ins welcome,
call 747-3711 for appointment,
West Quad, Room K103,11
a.m.-4 p.m.
Q Safewalk Nighttime Safety
Walking Service, 936-1000,
UGLi, lobby, 8 p.m.-1:30 a.m.;
Angell Hall, 1:30-2:30 a.m.

Be a
part of
people
making
h.istory.
Report
for the
D aily

he
ndergradu e
ibrary i~s
ow open,
:00 a.m.-
:00 a.m.
even (7)

3

F

DESKS OFFICE FURNITURE HAND TOOLS CHAIRS 22GMCVAN
WE WILL HAVE A PUBUC AUCTION AT 3439 ELLSWORTH ROAD,
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN. LOCATED 1 MILE EAST OF STATE
STREET SOUTH OF 194.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 30TH AT 10:00A.Y.
192 GMC22' VAN TRUCK WA4YDRAUUC UFTGATE
PNEUMATIC SANDERS, DRILLS HAND TOOLS
AIR HOSES MC. POWER TOOLS
BELT SANDERS HAMMERS
SAWS

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