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September 24, 1993 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1993-09-24

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2 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, September 24, 1993

NEWS
Continued from page 1
annually remains in the top 25.
"They tell you what are the top tier
of U.S. universities. We're in the tier
every year," Harrison said.
University President James
Duderstadt echoed the sentiment that
the non-academic categories skew the
ranking for public universities.
"The surveys are really based on
very weird things," he said. "There
are facts that discriminate againstpub-

lic universities."
For anyone who still follows the
University's fluctuation in the annual
ranking, its 1990 spot was 21st, 1991
was 22nd and last year was 24th. The
leap to 23rd seems to be bucking the
downward trend of the past few years.
This marks the first year the Uni-
versity of Notre Dame was among the
top universities.
Harvard University - the top
ranked - got scores of 1st, 1st, 3rd,
6th, 1st and 29th in the respective
categories.

COMMENT
Continued from page 1
have an impact on the amendment.
She said the bylaw is intended to
apply to individuals, not campus
groups.
Associate Prof. of English Marlon
Ross said the campus needs this
amendment. He suggested that the
University's lack of a bylaw prohibit-
ing discrimination based on sexual
orientation could cause prospective
staff and students to think twice be-

fore coming to the University.
"I was dismayed to discover that
the University at the highest level has
not acted to ensure tolerance to all
members of this community, exclud-
ing those who happen to be gay, les-
bian or bisexual," he said.
Meredith Uy, a second-year medi-
cal student and president of the Chris-
tian Medical and Dental Society,
claimed that the University does not
need to add this amendment because it
is already "tilted" toward gay and les-
bian groups and away from religious

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groups.
"To my knowledge there are cur-
rently two full-time staff persons for
the Lesbian-Gay Male Programs Of-
fice while there is only one person in
the Office of Ethics and Religion.
"Discrimination against religious
groups on campus is largely ignored,"
she said.
Van Harrison, a post-graduate fac-
ulty member in medicine, criticized
the regents for not acting sooner on
amending the bylaw to be in concur-
rence with an almost decade-old presi-
dential policy.
Assistant Dean of the Law School
Virginia Gordan used examples of the
"real and ugly" discrimination against
lesbians, gay men and bisexuals she
said exists on campus.
"In my work I hear of derogatory
comments about gay people made ca-
sually in passing conversations in hall-
ways, lunchrooms, dorms and class-
rooms. I hear of them and I hear the
comments myself," she said.
Heather Brunsink, president of the
Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship,
argued that there was not enough pub-
lic input on the issue.
"Is it right to make a decision with-
out even letting the public know this
issue is even being considered? I won-
der how many students know that this
proposal is being debated here today
or how many members of the faculty
know what's going on today, how
many parents of students at this Uni-
versity know," she said..
"I think the regents cannot legiti-
mately pass this proposal without con-
sidering the thoughts and opinions of
the people who comprise this Univer-
sity."
Despite the protests of half of the
speakers, McGowan and Deitch said

after the meeting they still plan to
propose the amendment adding gays,
lesbians and bisexuals toBylaw 14.06,
but they will not include an exemp-
tion for religious groups, as many of
the speakers had requested.
Deitch said that will still be pro-
tected under the First Amendment,
which takes precedence over the re-
gental bylaw.
Regent Deane Baker (R-Ann Ar-
bor) said he will oppose the amend-
ment. "I oppose the bylaw. I think it's
not necessary. There is not discrimi-
nation on this campus against homo-
sexuals," he said.
He noted that gays, lesbians and
bisexuals are hired, promoted and ad-
mitted to the University and said that
there are other courses of action avail-
able to anyone who feels they have
been discriminated against.
The majority of the regents said
they were in favor of the amendment,
but some said they had reservations.
Regent Shirley McFee (R-Battle
Creek) said she supports the amend-
ment in principle but she would have
reservations if the amendment is pro-
posed as Deitch and McGowen are
planning.
She said she is waiting to see the
impact on such organizations as the
Reserve Officer Training Corps
(ROTC) and affirmative action.
"I do believe this is a group of
individuals who have been selected
out for negative action on the part of
society and all society. I would cer-
tainly like to give (the amendment) a
try.
McGowan and Deitch have said
they will propose the amendment at
today's regents' meeting, which be-
gins at 9 a.m. in the Regents' Room of
the Fleming Administration Building.

01

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LECTURE
GURDJIEFF-OUSPENSKY
Sunday, September 26th
at 3:00 pm
Michigan League Bldg.
Kalamazoo Room
911 N. University
Rligious
Services
A.A.AVAVA
ANN ARBOR CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1717 Broadway (near N. Campus)
665-0105
SUNDAY:
Traditional Service-9 a.m.
Contemporary Service-1115 a.m.
Evening Service-6 p.m.
Complete Education Program for
Children through Adults
Nursery care available at all services
CAMPUS CHAPEL
a campus ministry of the
Christian Reformed Church
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
(just south of Geddes & Washtenaw)
668-7421/662-2404
Pastor: Rev. Don Postema
SUNDAY WORSHIP:
10 a.m.-student led worship
6 p.m.-video/discussion/worship
"What is faith?"
WEDNESDAYS:
9-10 p.m.-Student R.O.C.K. Group-join
us for conversation, fun, refreshments
CHRISTIANS IN ACTION
athi Alpha Campus Fellowship
FRIDAY;T GIF-Sep. 24,7 p.m.,
MLB Lec Rm 1
SUNDAYS: Bible Doctrines Class-5 p.m.,
MLB Rm B134
For more info call:
769-9560,6654740, 764-2135

-C 1-ollneo m ing '9
Tckets on sale TODAY!
de nnxis miller
Thursday Oct. 21 8pm Hill
$10 students-available at Michigan Union Ticket Office
$15 non-students-available at all Ticketmaster locations
a / Homecoming '93 presentation
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Schorling Auditorium
School of Education
SUNDAY: Service 11a.m.

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1140 South University
(Above Good-Thnh Chadey's)
Ann ArborE, NM48104
Pit 6M-5800
P L-SaL 0A-11 pM
sa 12am-11PL'

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CHURCH OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD UCC
2145 Independence Blvd. (E. of Packard)
An interracial / multicultural, warm
& lively, eco-justice, eco-peace church.
All sexual orientations are welcome.
10 a.m. Morning praise & worship
Rev. Michael Dowd Pastor 971-6133
EVANGEL TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
Washtenaw at Stadium
Where students from many
denominational backgrounds meet
SUNDAY: Free van rides from campus
Bursley and Baits bus stops 9:20 a.m.
Hill Dorms (front doors) 9:25 a.m.
Quads (front) 9:30 a.m., 9:35 a.m.
769-4157 or 761-1009 for more info.
HIS HOUSE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
925 E. Ann St.
A non-denominational student
organization which meets for Bible
Study, Prayer, Worship and Fellowhip:
SUNDAYS: 7-8:30 p.m.
T HURSDAYS: 7:30-9 p.m.
WEEKLY SMALL GROUPS
Visit our Campus House at 925 E. Ann
or call our Campus Minister, John Sowash,
663-0483 for more information.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN CHURCH, ELCA
801 S. Forest (at Hill St.), 668-7622
SUNDAY: Worship - 10 a.m.
WEDNESDAY: Study/ Discussion 6 p.m.
"Jesus Through the Centuries"
Evening Prayer - 7 p.m.
John Rollefson and Joyce Miller
Campus Ministers
NORTHSIDE COMMUNITY CHURCH
929 Barton Drive 662-6351
near Plymouth Rd.-5 min from N Campus
SUNDAY-9:45 a.m.-Sun School for all ages
11 a.m. - Worship, child care provided
THURSDAY - 5:45 p.m. - Campus Dinner
and Bible Study for students & spouses
A special welcome to students
and north campus residents
ST. MARY'S STUDENT PARISH
(A Roman Catholic Parish at U-M)
331 Thompson Street
Weekend Liturgies
SATURDAY: 5 p.m.
SUNDAY: 8:30 a.m., 10 a.m., 12 noon,
5 p.m., and 7 p.m.
FRIDAY: Confessions-4-5 p.m.
Ta rKI'fln,'T, ilf'r,.Drn t fhAvfrl *rue

Continued from page 1
6 a.m.
Clinton asked for help in persuad-
ing the public the current system is
grossly inefficient. Clinton's plan to
provide universal coverage is ex-
pected to cost an additional $350
billion over five years.
"It is still sinking in on our fellow
citizens," Clinton said.
"There's still a lot of people that
don't think we're going to get this
done," Clinton said.
He also said the system has dete-

HEALTH

riorated so much that it will be pos-
sible to form a national consensus.
"We don't wantto rush this thing;
it's too complicated," Clinton said.
"But we don't want to delay it, using
complexity as an excuse."
Clinton asked for help in press-
ing members of Congress to keep
pledges of bipartisanship on the is-
sue.
Hillary Rodham Clinton and Tip-
per Gore spoke, as well.
Treasury Secretary Lloyd
Bentsen crossed the state of Penn-
sylvania for tours of a rubber busi-
ness, then an ice cream company.

0

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students at the University of Michigan. Subscriptions for fall term, starting in September, via U.S. mail are $90.
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I EDITORIAL

)ubo, Eitoinhe

NEWS Melissa Peer.ess, Managing Editor
EDITORS: Hope Calati, Lauren Dormer, Karen Sabgir, PurviShah
STAFF: Adam Anger, Jonathan Berndt, James Cho, Jon DiMascio, Erin Einhom, Michelle Fricke, Soma Gupta, Michele Hatty, Greg Hoey,
Nate Hurley, Sarah.Kjino. Randy Lebowitz, Peter Matthews, Will McCahill, Byn Mickle, Shelley Morrison, Mona Qureshi, David
Rheingold, Julie Robinson, David Shepardson, Karen Talaski, Andrew Taylor, Jennifer Tianen, Scot Woods. -
CALENDAR EDITORS: Jonathan Bemdt, Andrew Taylor.
EDITORIAL PAGE Andrew Levy, Editor
ASSOCIATE EDITORS: Sam Goodstein. Flint Wainess
STAFF: Julie Becker, Patrick Javid, Judith Kafka, Jim Lasser, Jason Lichtstein,. Amiava Mazumdar, Mo Park.
SPORTS Ryan Herrington, Managing Editor
EDITORS: Brett Forrest, Adam Miller, Chad A. Safran, Ken Sugiura
STAFF: Bob Abramson, Rachel Bachman, Paul Barger, Tom Bausano, Charlie Breitrose, Tonya Broad, Jesse Brouhard, Scott Burton,
Andy De Korte, Brett Johnson, David Kraft, Brent McIntosh, Antoine Pitts, Tim Rardin, Michael Rosenberg, Jaeson Rosenfeld, J.L
Rostam-Abadi, Dave Schwartz, Elisa Sneed, Tim Spolar, Jeremy Strachan.
ARTS Jessie Hailaday, Nina Hodael, Editors
EDITORS: Jon Altshul (Film), Elizabeth Shaw (Theater), Melissa Rose Benardo (Weekend etc.), Darcy Lockman (Weekend etc.), Tom
Erewine (Music), Kirk Wetters (Fine Arts).
STAFF: Jason Carroll, Andy Dolan, Geoff Earle, Camilo Fontecila: Jody Frank, Kim Gaines, Chadotte Garry, Oliver Giancola, Kristen
Knudsen, Karen Lee, John R. Rybock, Karen Schweitzer, Michael Thompson. Jason Vilna.
PHOTO Michele Guy, Editor
ASSISTANT EDITORS: Douglas Kanter, Sharon Musher, Evan Petrie
STAFF: Anastasia Banicki, Josh Deth, Susan isaak, Mary Kokhab, Elizabeth Lippman, Rebecca Margolis, Peter Matthews.

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