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September 21, 1993 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1993-09-21

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The Michgan Daily - Tuesday, September 21, 1993- 7

LOOK MOM!

Congress close to. decision on bases

WASHINGTON (AP)-Congress
neared a final vote yesterday on rec-
ommendations to shut 130 military
bases and scale back 45 others in a
money-saving effort that will cost tens
of thousands of jobs nationwide.
The Senate considered a motion to
disapprove the work of the seven-mem-
her Defense Base Closure and Re-
alignment Commission. The panel sub-
mitted its recommendations to Presi-
dent Clinton on July 1; it took him less
than 24 hours to approve the list'and
send it to Congress.
The law creating the commission
requires that the entire package take
effect unless both the House and Sen-
ate vote to overturn it in its entirety.
The Senate was expected to endorse
the recommendations. No motion of
disapproval has surfaced in the House.
This marks the third round of base
closures in five years, and another swipe
at reducing military infrastructure is
planned for 1995.
The bulk of the direct job, losses

will he concentrated in three states.
Hardest hit are California, slated to lose
more than 40,000 military and civilian
defense-relatedjobs; Florida, facing the
loss of 22,000 jobs, and South Carolina,
which is expected to lose more than
14,700 jobs.
Among the major installations on
the list are Alameda Naval Air Station in
California, the Orlando Naval Training
Center in Florida and the Charleston
Naval Station and Naval Shipyard in
South Carolina
The commission estimated thatclos-
ing the bases will save about $4 billion
from fiscal 1994 to fiscal 1999 after
one-time closure costs of $7 billion.
Savings after thetumn of the century will
he about $2.3 billion annually.
California Democratic Sen. Dianne
Feinstein, sponsor of the motion to re-
ject the closings, descrihed her effort as
"a last-ditch plea." She argued the panel
failed to acknowledge the economic
impact of its decisions.
"It's almost like a doomsday ma-

chune. It goes on and on regardless of
what happens," Feinstein said of the
commission.
Sen. John Glenn, a member of the
Armed Services Committee, conceded
that closing bases is painful, but re-
minded his colleagues that it is neces-
sary as the military reduces the number
of troops and weapons.
"We just can't afford to keep every-
thing open thatwe wouldlike tokeepopen
all over the county" the Ohio Democrat
said.'7be Cold Warhaspassed us. We're
inatimeofslowdown....Wedon'tneedall
these bases, and basically we can't con-

tinmeto pay for then."
Earlier this year, the four military
services made their recommendations
to Defense Secretary Les Aspin, who
then submitted his proposal on closures
and realignments to the commission on
March.12.
The panel traveled to bases around
the country and held scores of hearings
hefore five days of public debate and
votes on the final list in late June. The
commission rejected the Pentagon's
recommendation to close six major in-.
stallations but accepted the rest of its
proposals.

EUZABEI1 LIPPMAN/Daiiy
A prospective customer checks out the merchandise at a local bookstore.
Warring factions,
*filto reach accord
t sUrprise meetit.n

11

L*

__j

ZAGREB, Croatia (AP)-Bosnia's
three warring factions failed anew to
come to ter~ns at a surprise meeting
yesterday aboard a British warship in
the Adriatic Sea, wrecking plans for a
* peace signing in Sarajevo.
Croatian radio and the "Politika"
TIV news program in Belgrade, the
aYugoslav capital, said the Sarajevo
meeting had been called off.
Croatas HINAnews agency quoted
mediators' spokesperson John Mills as
saying there were "no steps forward in
.negotiations" yesterday on the aircraft
carrier HMS Invincible.
The biggest obstacle to the plan,
*,which would divide Bosnia into Serb,
Croat and Muslim ministates, appeared
to be a dispute over how to give the
Muslim-led government access to the
Adriatic.
Th*'Ie meeting includedBosnian Presi-
dent Alija Izetbegovic, Bosnian Croat
-leader Mate Boban and Croatian Presi-

The biggest obstacle to
the plan.. appeared to be
a dispute over how to give
the Musflntied
government access to the
Adriatic.
dent Franjo Tudjman. HINA said Presi-
dent Slobodan Milosevic of Serbia and
Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic
also were aboard, although some re-
ports said Kamadzic sentrepresentatives.
The session was mediated by spe-
cial envoys Lord Owen of the European
Community and Thorvald Stoltenherg
of the United Nations, who had said
they hoped a plan could he ready for
signing Tuesday in the besieged Bosnian
capital.
HINA said Tudjmnan was returning
to Zagreb. Stoltenberg and Owen were
reported to have flown to Split, Croatia.

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FOREIGN SERVICE~
Information Session
* Thursday, September 23 4
* 6:00 - 7:30-p.m.
* Auditorium B, Angell Hall
Come learn ahout student employment
p'rog ramns and ca reer opportunities from
Tom Miller, Foreign Service Officer
An Equal T opuiyElor

J

The BETICE nTwn h ET RCSI Tw!Te'ETPIESI on

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