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September 20, 1993 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1993-09-20

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2 - The Michigan Daily - Monday, September 20, 1993

RECEPTIONISTS
THE MICHIGAN UNION SCHEDULING OFFICE
IS NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR FALL 1993.
.GREET C LENTS.FILE Te.....
MONDAY 10,'13-5
TUESDAY 8-9:30,12-5
FRIDAY 8-lOAM
APPLY AT 1400 MICHIGAN UNION
MICHIGAN UNION

POLLACK
Continued from page 1
"They want to keep the guy who's
there," said Pollack, who added party
officials had asked her not to rock the
political boat.
Pollack also spoke briefly about
health reform. She said she supported a
single-payer system similar to the Ca-
nadian health program, where the gov-
ernmentpays all health-care costs. "This
could save the government $100 billion
in paperwork alone," said the senator.
Pollack concluded by calling for a
balanced budget, saying, "Reducing the
deficit should be the number one prior-
ity for anyone going to Washington
today."

Pol lack

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RIEGLE
Continued from page 1
As expected, reaction from students
was overwhelmingly favorable.
Katrina Nagaprakash, an LSA jun-
ior, said, "I enjoyed his point that in an
academic setting you can get bogged
down in theories. It was good to hear
someone speak so persuasively on the
issue."
LSA junior Benjamin Bolger added
that the problem is with NAFTA, not the
idea of increasing trade. "I think that
trade with Mexico is notabad thing," he
said. "It is the way we do trade with
them that's important."
Riegle also stated his support of
President Clinton's health care plan. He
stressed the importance of bipartisan
cooperation for its passage. He said he
has seen a draft proposal of the Clinton
administration's health care plan, but
the plan is not polished.
"(Clinton's) idea is to present the
concept on Wednesday night, and then
waitaboutthree weeks, getting reaction
and suggestions," Riegle said. "Then,
about three weeks later, actually pro-
duce a written legislative draft."
Republican support for the
President's plan is crucial, Riegle said,
because Democratic leaders cannot
count on the support of every Democrat
on this issue.
Riegle saidheattempted toputhealth
care on the national agenda duriit, the
Bush administration. He said he g: :
his proposal to several members of the
Bush Cabinet, who became eager to
pursue the issue. "Nothing ever came of
it because Bush never engaged the is-
sue," Riegle said.
Highlights of the President's health
care plan, taken from a 239-page draft
summary and White House briefings,
include the following:
State governments would create
health alliances, or large purchasing
pools, which would use their clout to
force insurers and providers to compete
for customers. Consumers would be
able to choose among several plans and
employers would pay 80 percent of
their employees' insurance costs.
The plan features 100-percent de-
ductibility of health care costs for the

I see, In a different form,
some of the same elitism
behind this Mexican free
trade agreement. I see a
lot of people who are out
of the line of fire and will
not lose their jobs ... and
they're for the NAFTA.'
- Sen. Donald Riegle
self-employed, a standardized claims
form and subsidies for some small busi-
nesses.
Medicare and Medicaid would
remain essentially the same, with no
reduction in benefits.
Taxes on cigarettes and possibly
liquor would raise $15 billion a year to
pay the initial costs of the plan.
The senator used an example from
his personal life to illustrate what he
sees wrong with the present health care
system. His father, whose kidneys were
failing, was being given an intravenous
liquid food supplement
The substance was only good for24
hours, at a cost of $600 a bottle. At the
end of each day, half of the bottle was
thrown away.
"I told the nurse, 'We only need a
$300 bottle.' She agreed. She came
back the next day and told us, 'They
don't make a $300 bottle.' This is an
enormous amount of money being, in
effect, thrown in the wastebasket,"
Riegle said.
LSA sophomore Neil McDermott
said that he, like Riegle, supports the
plan. "I like the fact that everyone is
going to get health care."
Sujatha Singaracharlu, an LSA se-
nior, said, "We undoubtedly need to
revamp the system."
Riegle noted that with the possibil-
ity of Republican gains in the Senate in
the 1994 elections, Democrats must act
quickly to implement President
Clinton's legislative package. "There's
a legislative window that runs from
today through roughly October 1st of
next year," Riegle said.
After his speech, Riegle answered
questions from the audience, telling one
young man, "Hang on to your idealism;
it's your greatest asset."

"

a

p i

Applications also available at:
,iversty of Mkhlgari
er Planning, ac ent

UNITED
Continued from page 1

I

Va., attributed this to the fact that the
University of Michigan chapter of
United We Stand, America (UWSA) is
only weeks old.
Silversmith, the president, and
Harnsberger, the media relations liai-
son, did not find each other on campus,
but through the UWSA national organi-
zation, located in Dallas.
The two were inspired to start a
chapter through the UWSA newsletter
which spoke of college students across
the country launching chapters.
Attempting to decrease the amount
of apathy among students, these two
hope to involve others who are con-
cerned.
'We're just trying to get students
involved in the issues being decided in
Washington today," Harnsberger said
In discussing NAFTA, Silversmith
was clear in his belief that this treaty
will harm American workers, as well as
those in Mexico.
"Ultimately, in order to protect
American jobs, the government needs
to reduce the cost of the American

worker," Silversmith said. "Until that
happens, NAFTA is a disaster."
Nevertheless, both Hamsberger and
Silversmith were careful to note that
they were more interested in hearing
Ross Perot than in echoing anti-NAFTA
positions.
UWSA members will recruit stu-
dents for the campus chapter atFestifall
today. Adonation of $15 is necessary to
formally joie, the national organization
in its fight to put "America first."
With agoal of 3 million members by
the end of this year, and 10,000 mem-
bers in each congressional district by
the mid-term congressional election in
1994, Silversmith predicted thatUWSA
would have an active role in electing
members to Congress.
Silversmith who stood about ten
rows away from the Texan, was pleased
that he made the trek, butsaid he wished
the speech had focused on issues be-
yond NAFTA.
"I thought it was lacking in detail,
but full of good political rhetoric," he
said.

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