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September 17, 1993 - Image 11

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The Michigan Daily, 1993-09-17

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The Michigan Daily -Friday, September 17, 1993 - 11

Conference goes for
second big weekend

By DAVID KRAFT
DAILY SPORTS WRITER
While Michigan's loss last week to
Notre Dame startled many a football
fan, there was an even bigger surprise
around the gridirons of the Midwest.
The Big Ten, er, ... Big Eleven, had a
winning weekend against their non-
conference foes.
Last Saturday, defying the current
trend, the Big Ten posted an impressive
eight victories against only two losses.
Illinois, with its loss to Missouri,joined
the Wolverines as the other victim.
With Michigan having the week off
to see if it can find a way to stop Hous-
ton, the rest of the once-football proud
conference will try to prove last week
was no fluke.
Week three servings:
Notre Dame (2-0) at Michigan
State (1-0):
It's funny how things change? The
Spartans finally win a season opener
and everybody in the Lansing area starts
frolicking as if they just won the Rose
Bowl. In all fairness to Michigan State,
they did defeat a Kansas team that was
drained from its victory over Western
Carolina the previous Saturday.
Inorder to give his players that extra
edge over offensive threats Craig Tho-
mas and Mill Coleman, Lou Holtz tells
his troops in a pre-game speech that

beating a George Perles-coached team
is like beating Bear Bryant and Joe
Namath in Birmingham - it works.
Fighting Irish, 35-24.
Ohio State (2-0) at Pittsburgh (1-
1)
Are the Buckeyes for real? They
finally won a big game and now all
those people on High Street are booking
their plans for Pasadena only to realize
that for Ohio State, the road to the Rose
Bowl usually dies somewhere between
Champaign and Madison.
In Pittsburgh, Johnny Majors' pres-
ence helps brighten a city whose most
picturesque tourist attraction is Three
Rivers Stadium. Unfortunately for the
Panthers, they'llhave toborrow acouple
of former Steelers to get past Dan
Wilkinson and the rest of the Buckeye
defense that held Washington to 12
points.
Ohio State, 20-7.
Arizona (2-0) at Illinois (0-1):
The Illini got stomped by aMissouri
team that hasn't had a winning record
since 1983. On the otherhand, the Wild-
cats, with their nationally-acclaimed
defense, led by noseguardRobWaldrop,
continue to roll towards apossible Rose
Bowl date.
With freshman quarterback Scott
Weaver running the offense, Illinois'
best hope for a triumph is a huge snow-

storm in Champaign Friday night that
could take the warm weather Wildcats
by surprise.
Arizona, 31-10.
Boston College (0-1) at Northwest-
ern (0-1):
The much-improved Wildcats gave
Notre Dame more of a scare two weeks
ago than another supposedly better team
could do around these parts last Satur-
day.
Although Boston College, with one
of the best coaches in the game in Tom
Coughlin, fell to Miami, it still has big
play ability in senior QB Glenn Foley.
Northwestern cannot consider play-
ing in Evanston a homefield advan-
tage? They have more sympathetic fans
on the road than the people that pay to
see a game at Dyche Stadium. The
Eagles prevail on a Doug Flutie-like
play with no time left. The Wildcats go
home empty-handed once again.
Boston College, 16-14.
Iowa State at Wisconsin (2-0):
The Badgers may just be the sleeper
this season in the Big Ten. After barely.
missing a bowl game last year, Wiscon-
sin - under the tutelage of ex-Notre
Dame defensive guru Barry Alvarez -
is ready to challenge for the Big Ten
crown.
Well, that's probably overdoing it a
bit, but in all reality, the Badgers should

make a post-season trip somewhere this
year. The lowly Cyclones will not get in
the way despite having given Iowa a
tough battle one week ago
Wisconsin, 17-3.
Kentucky (1-1) at Indiana (2-0):
Word in Bloomington is that both
schools will save themselves embar-
rassment by putting their basketball
teams on the field instead.
The highlight of this game will be
when Bobby Knight - sitting in his
polished press box high above Memo-
rial Stadium - realizes that Hoosier
gridiron coach Bill Mallory has stolen
one of his prized recruits and inserted
him in the game at wide receiver.
In a fit of rage, Knight throws a desk
through the press box window after
Wildcat linebacker Marty Moore, the
SEC's leading tackler the last two sea-
sons, makes his 20th tackle of the game.
Kentucky, 6-2.
Penn State (2-0) at Iowa (2-0):
In the conference's best game of the
week, the biggest question is who will
shed their sunglasses first, Hayden Fry
or Joe Paterno? With the Nittany Lions
cruising late in the game because of the
oustanding performance of Outland
candidate Lou Benfatti, Paterno breaks
his own tradition out of boredom by
taking off his shades to clean them.
Amidst cloud, overcast skies, Fry
takes note of Paterno's shocking move
and considers the game a moral victory
despite the onslaught his team faces it
the field.
Nittany Lions, 30-13.
Kansas State at Minnesota (1-1):
In an effort to hype the game, the
Minnesota Sports Information Depart-
ment offers free tickets to a Vikings
game for anyone who stays through the
fourth quarter.
Tothe Golden Gophers'amazement,
the entire crowd starts cheering on their
home town team to run the clock down
with 13 minutes left even though Min-
nesota is losing by three.
The Golden Gophers realize the
importance of making their fans happy
and sit on the ball.
Kansas State, 3-0.

I

Battle with Florida State is biggest
. game for North Carolina in years

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) -
There's a big ACC game this weekend
on Tobacco Road. Two undefeated teams
will play before a sellout crowd on
national television. The hype is enor-
mous, the No. 1 ranking is on the line
and the winner could capture the na-
tional championship.
"It should be a great game," North
Carolina basketball coach Dean Smith
said. "I can't wait to watch it on televi-
sion."
Smith will be a fan Saturday night
when top-ranked Florida State visits
No. 13 North Carolina in the most im-
portant football game at Kenan Sta-
dium in a dozen years.
Big gamesare nothing new in Chapel
Hill, but they usually involve Smith's
basketball teams, which have won two
national championships and 16 ACC
regular-season titles. There hasn't been
this much excitement over football since
1981, whenNo. 8North Carolinalost to
No.2 Clemson 10-8.
"People are comparing it to the Fi-
nal Four," said Corey Holliday, the
school's all-time leading receiver.
"Weknow this is abasketball school,
but we want to have our own identity,"
saidfellowreceiverBucky Brooks. "We
want people to say, 'North Carolina is a
great school for basketball AND foot-
ball.'"
North Carolina and Florida State are
both high-scoring teams with 3-0
records. Florida State is an established
power that is favored to win its first
national championship. North Carolina
is a rising challenger that has made
steady strides under coach Mack Brown
since posting 1-10 records in 1988 and
X-COUNTRY
Continued from page 10
cobwebs out. I want to get one more
race in before we go out to Montana."
In order to provide each individual
athlete with the proper training sched-
ule to compete at their best, McGuire
has developed a framework that allows
for adaptation. Hence, the resting of
Babcock, Kluge and Harvey and the
racing of Szabo and McClimon.
"The flexibility in our training al-
lows us to keep individuals running at
an optimal level," McGuire said. "We
have different mileage for everyone.
We didn'thave to go down to this meet,
but I think it helps in the overall devel-
opment of the team."
J I

1989.
Just how far the 'far Heels have
come will be determined against the
Seminoles, who have outscored Kan-
sas, Duke and Clemson, 144-7.
"We want respect," said senior de-
fensive back Bracey Walker, who has
blocked five punts in his career and is
known as the hardest hitter on the team.
"If we beat Florida State, we'll get all
the respect we deserve."
The Tar Heels already have the re-
spect of Florida State coach Bobby
Bowden, who was very impressed by
their 31-9 rout of Southern Cal in the
Pigskin Classic.
"They looked as good as anybody
I've seen this year," Bowden said.
"They've got some speed, especially in
their defensive front, and they're scor-
ing a lot of points."
North Carolina will probably have
to score often to beat Florida State,
which is averaging 48 points and 599
yards per game. The Seminoles have
been virtually unstoppable since switch-
ing to their "fast-break" offense late
last season, and Carolina's defense
looked vulnerable last week in a 59-42
VOLLEYBALL
Continued from page 10
rest of the season.
Iowa State is not a top-twenty team,
but they compare favorably, outside of
Illinois and Penn State, with many of
the teams that Michigan will be com-
peting with for third place in the Big
Ten.
"Iowa State is a type of match that
we are going to need to win the rest of
the season,"saidGiovanazzi. "Although
their record is not fantastic, they have
played a lot of tough teams and played
them well."

win over Maryland.
TheTarHeels think Maryland's run-
and-shoot offense was good prepara-
tion for Florida State's no-huddle, shot-
gun attack, which is directed by Heisman
Trophy contender Charlie Ward.
"I think our defense is going to step
up to the challenge," linebacker
Bernardo Harris said.
North Carolina has met many chal-
lenges since going 2-20 in Brown's first
two seasons. Brown said he "cried like
a 2-year-old" after the Tar Heels hit
bottom with a 12-7 loss to Navy in
1989, but he started to turn the program
around the following season with a6-4-
1 record. Carolina improved to 7-4 in
1991 and 9-3 last season, including a
victory over Mississippi State in the
Peach Bowl.
One of Carolina's most devoted foot-
ball fans is Smith, who was a third-
string quarterback on the freshman team
at Kansas. He rarely misses a home
game, although he'll be out of town
Saturday on a recruiting trip.
"I have great respect for Mack
Brown," Smith said. "He's very per-
sonable and he's a great motivator."
While Iowa State represents the
middle-level teams in the Big Ten, Colo-
rado is right at the level of conference
favorites Illinois and Penn State. In fact,
Colorado plays a similar style to the
Illini and the Nittany Lions, which
should really give Michigan an idea of
how they will match-up against the
league's elite.
"'They are a small, quick team and
they handle the ball real well," said
Giovanazzi. "Theyhaveawell-defined,
complicated offensive scheme so it
should be a real test. We'll be looking
more to compete and learn and not
concern ourselves with winning."

DOUGLAS KANT ER /Daily
Notre Dame, after its victory over Michigan, is favored to complete a Great Lake State
football sweep with a win over Michigan State.
RECEPTIONISTS
THE MICHIGAN UNION SCHEDULING OFFICE
IS NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR FALL 1993.
GREET CLIENTS -FILE" TYPE...
MONDAY 10-12, 3-5
TUESDAY 8-9:30, 12-5
FRIDAY 8-1OAM
PPLY. AT 1400 MICHIGAN UNION
MICHIGAN UNION

I

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