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September 17, 1993 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1993-09-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

2 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, September 17, 1993

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AN N N A -R R 2
5th AVE. AT LIBERTY 761-9700
ORLANDO (PG-13) " THE STORY OF QIU JU (PG)
MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING (PG-13)
Bargain Matinees $3.50 before 6 pm
Students with ID $400 eveninas

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HERITAGE
Continued from page 1
of our past: the many voices of our
future," aims to show others about the
Latino world- traditional and modern.
Sandra Suarez, an LSA junior, is in
charge of inviting artists to perform at
the University.
"I'd like to bring in something really
good that students would like to show
others good aspects of our culture."
However, she added that "we have such
a small budget it makes it hard to bring
in those kind of events."
She is particularly looking forward
to the film festival "especially the Bo-
livian film. It's nice to see these in Ann
Arbor when it's hard to see them even in
a place like New York."
The film festival is also popular with
LSA senior Rayda Cruz, who supports

Present this coup

OUT WITH THE OLD

1MCLASSIC SUBS
301 E. Liberty
at Fifth across from
Ann Arbor Theater.
668-7900

>on with purchased ticket thru 9/30/93
.. ..... . .... ...... . ...)

the decision to extend Hispanic Heri-
tage Month for the rest of the year.
I am most looking forward to the
Eddie Palmieri concert and the mov-
ies," she said.
Whatever the event, whoever the
speaker, organizers urge students across
campus to participate in Hispanic Heri-
tage Month activities this year as they
have in the past.
Berdy said she hopes that having
events such as these will aid in dispel-
ling many myths and stereotypes built
up through history and the media.
"A lot of students who come here
mayhaveneverbeen exposed toaLatino
in their whole life. By bringing students
together with music, food and other
events we canput them at ease so we can
all accept each other," Berdy said.

1$ 4regular sandwich
$ 99bag of chips
med. drink
exp. 10/31/93
rge sandwich
$599 bag of chips
med. drink
exp. 10/31/93

Is

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS!
Picture Yourself In the 1994
MICHIGANEN SIAN YEARBOOK
In order to best represent the 1993-1994 school year, we, at the
Michiganensian Yearbook, are hoping to cover as many student organi-
zations as possible in the 1994 Michiganensian yearbook. All student
organizations are invited and encouraged to be a part of the
Michiganensian tradition.
If you wish to have your organization covered in the Michiganensian,
stop by our office in the Student Publications Building located at 420
Maynard (next to the Student Activities Building) and pick up a
coverage application. The application is due October 22 and profes-
sional group photographs will be taken the week of November 1.
Leave your mark in a yearbook that will be cherished by students forever!
Questions? Call 764-0561

V

DIAG
Continued from page 1
"There need to be guidelines so that
the program is for the good of the com-
munity and not against the good of the
University. I do think, though, that
events should be judged on a case-to-
case basis," she said.
Conflict between the administration
and students opposed to the policy first
came toahead lastApril with the annual
Hash Bash celebration.
The University denied a permit to
the campus chapter of the National Or-
ganization for the Reform of Marijuana
Laws (NORML) unless it paid a $9,400
fee for security and cleanup costs.
NORML took the University tocourtto
be exempt from the fee and won.
WLCOMEPICNIC
Sunday Sept. 19
6p.m.
Free food, fun & fellowship
Lutheran Campus Ministry
ELCA
801 S. Forest (at Hill)
Religious,
services
AVAVAVAVA
ANN ARBOR CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1717 Broadway (near N. Campus)
665-0105
SUINDAY
Traditional Service-9 am.
Contemporary Service-11:15 a.m.
Evening Service-6 p.m.
Complete Education Program for
Children through Adults
Nursery care available at all services
CAMPUS CHAPEL
a campus ministry of the
Christian Reformed Church
" 1236 Washtenaw Ct.
(just south of Geddes & Washtenaw
66&7421662-2404
Pastor: Rev. Don Postema
SUNDAY WORSHIP
10 a.m.-"Rediscovering Jesus Christ"
6 p.m.-Meditative service of prayer & singing
WEDNESDAYS
9-10 p.m.-Student R.O.C.K. Group-join us
for conversation, fun, refreshments
CHURCH OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD UCC
2145 Independence Blvd. (E. of Packard)
An interracial / multicultural, warm
& lively, eco-justice, eco-peace church.
All sexual orientations are welcome.
10 a.m. Morning praise & worship
Rev. Michael Dowd Pastor 971-6133
HIS HOUSE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
925 E. Ann St.
A non-denominational student
organization which meets for Bible
Study, Prayer, Worship and Fellowhip:
SUNDAYS:7-8:30 p.m.
THURSDAYS: 7:30-9 p.m.
WEEKLY SMALL GROUPS
visit our Campus House at 925 E. Ann
or call our Campus Minister, JohnSowash,
663-0483 for more information.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
ORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN CHURCH, ELCA
801 S. Forest (at Hill St.), 668-7622
SUNDAY: Worship - 10 a.m.
Welcome Picnic - 6 p.m.
WEDNESDAY: Study/Discussion 6 p.m.
"Jesus Through the Centuries"
Evening Prayer - 7 p.m.
John Rollefson and Joyce Miller
Campus Ministers
NORTHSIDE COMMUNITY CHURCH
929 Barton Drive 662351
near Plymouth Rd. -5 min from N Campus
SUNDAY 9:45 a.m.-Sun School for all ages
11 a.m. - Worship, child care provided
THURSDAY - 5:45 p.m. - Campus Dinner

and Bible Study for students & spouses
A special welcome to students
and north campus residents
See display advertisement
ST. MARY'S STUDENT PARISH
(A Roman Catholic Parish at U-M)
331 Thompson Street
SATURDAY: Weekend Liturgies-5 p.m.
SUNDAY: -8:30 a.m., 10 a.m., 12 noon,

ANASTASIA BANICKI/ Daily
Stephanie Silberman (throwing) tosses bread crumbs into the Huron River to
celebrate the Jewish new year, along with other members of the Hillel Jewish Student
Center, Stefanie Silverman and Alissa Strauss.

HEALTH CARE
Continued from page 1
Cancervictim Suzy Somers read her
letter, which toldhow she lost her health
insurance after her ex-husband went
bankrupt.Then she added, "Last week,
I found another lump on my breast."
Another woman, Jean Kazmarck of
Glen Ellyn, Ill., read the letter she had
written about how she was having
trouble getting health insurance because
of problems she'd had with her first
pregnancy. She wants a second child
but is worried about her lack of cover-
age. "Now we find ourselves stuck,"
she wrote.
First lady Hillary Rodham Clinton,
who chaired the president's health care
task force, said insurance companies
discriminate against people with histo-
ries of health problems, forcing many to
go without coverage or stay locked in
jobs with coverage.
"I could never figure out why insur-
ance companies only wanted to insure
people who'd never been sick or never

would get sick. I think that eliminates
everybody," Mrs. Clinton said.
While Brigitte Burdine of Van Nuys,
Calif., talked about her sister's battle
with the AIDS virus and medical bills,
her HIV-infected niece wandered away
from the tent and played on a swing
flung over an oak tree near the Oval
Office.
Clinton told Burdine that he wants
to form huge insurance pools, mitigat-
ing the costs of insuring AIDS patients.
"'The tough choice is that someone
likeyouinthesamepool, because you're
young and healthy and strong and un-
likely to be sick, might have to pay a
little bit more in your insurance premi-
ums so that everybody in the big pool
could always be covered and no one
could get kicked out," he said.
Clinton's plan would requireall busi-
nesses to pay 80 percent of workers'
premiums. No company would have to
pay more than 7.9 percent of payroll for
the health care, and there would be
subsidies for small businesses that would
allow some to pay 3.5 percent.

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01

AUTO TALKS
Continued from page 1
Knechtel, vice president ofGM's North
American personnel. "We will leave
those kinds of discussions for the bar-
gaining table."
GM probably will go last in the
negotiations. Though UAW President
Owen Bieber hasn't announced his de-
cision on what company will go next,
mostobservers figure it will be Chrysler
Corp. The No. 3 U.S. automaker has
cars and trucks in high demand and is
rapidly getting its financial house in
order.
The Canadian Auto Workers tenta-
tively settled with Chrysler Canada ear-

lier this weekonanew three-year agree-
ment. That has cleared the way for
focused negotiations with the UAW.
With the pattern in place pending
ratification by Ford workers over the
next few weeks and Chrysler's bargain-
ing proposals roughly the same as Ford's,
an agreement there is expected to be
reached quickly.
"Everybody's leaning toward us
being next, but we haven't heard any-
thing official," Chrysler spokesperson
Lee Sechler said. "We' lljusthave to see
what the union wants to do. They will
tell us."

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The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745.967) is published Monday through Friday during the fait and winter terms by
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NEWS Melissa Peerless, Managing Editor
EDITORS: Hope Galati, Laurena Dermer, Karen Sahgir, Purvi Shah
STAFF: Adam Anger, Jonathan Berdt James Cho. Kenneth Dancyger, Jon DMascio, Erin Einhom. Michelle Ricks, Soma Gupta,
Mchele Hatty, Greg Hoey, Nate Hurley, Sarah Kine. Megan Lardner. Randy Lebowitz, Peter Mathews, Will McCahill. Bryn Mickke,
Shelley Morrison, Mona Quesh, David Rheigold. Julie Robinson, David Shepardson, Karen Talaski, Andrew Taylor, Jennifer Tianen,
Soot Woods, Chrste Young
CALENDAR EDITORS: Michelle Fricke, Andrew Taylor.
GRAPHICS STAFF: David Acton, Jonathan Bemdt Andrew Taylor.
EDITORIAL PAGE Andrew Levy, Editor
ASSOCIATE EDITORS: Sam Goodsiekn, fint Wa ess
STAFF: Jude Becker, Patrick Javid, Judith Kaka, Jin Lasser. Jason Lchtstein, Amitava Mazumdar, Mo Park, Jordan Stanch.
SPORTS Ryan Herrington, Managing Editor
EDITORS: Brett Forrest, Adam Miller, chad A. Safran. Ken Sugiura
STAFF: Bob Abramsona, Rachel Bachmnan, Paul Barger, Tom Bausano, Charlie Brettrose, Tonya Broad. Jesse Brouhrard, Scott Burton,
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Rardin, Michael Rosenberg Jaeson Rosenfeld, J.L. Rostam-Abadi, Dave Schwartz, Elisa Sneed, Tim Spolar, Jiremy Strachan.
ARTS Jessie Halladay, Nkna Hodael, Editors
EDITORS: Jon Altshul (Film), Elizabeth Shaw (Theater), MelIssa Rose Bemardo (Weekend etc.), Darcy Lockman (Weekend etc.), Tom
Eriewkus (Muskc). ir Weters (Fne Ars).
STAFF: Jason Carrot. Andy Doln. Geoff Earls. Camlie Fonteclia, Jody Frank, Kim Gaies, Charlotte Garny, Olver Glancola, Wistesn
Knudsen, Karen Les. John, R. Rbock. Karen Schweitzer, Michael Thompson, Jason VW0a.
PHOTO Michelle Guy, Editor
ASSISTANT EDITORS: Doglas Kanter, Sharon MusEer, Evan Petie
STAFF: Anastasia Banidkl. Josh Deth. Susan issak. Mary Kou khab. Elizabeth Lpman, Rebecca Margolis. Peter Matthews.

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