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April 20, 1993 - Image 9

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The Michigan Daily, 1993-04-20

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The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, April 20, 1993- Page 9

Serbs hold fire as U.N. evacuates town

T[JZLA,Bosnia-Herzegovina(AP)
-Serb guns trainedon Srebrenicakept
silent yesterday while U.N. helicopters
flew out hundreds more sick and
wounded and U.N. troops sought to
cement a truce for the beleaguered
Muslim enclave.
More fighting was reportedbetween
nominally allied Muslims and Croats in
the central part of Bosnia.
The Serbs' grueling siege of
Srebrenica led to the virtual surrender
Sunday of the town, one of only three
eastern enclaves held by troops loyal to
Bosnia'sMuslim-led government. That
moved the Serbs closer to their goal of
seizing allofeasternBosniaanduniting
it with Serbia, and Serb-held areas in
Croatia to create a "Greater Serbia."
French and British helicopters flew
469 people from Srebrenica to Tuzla, a
Muslimcityabout45miles to thenorth-
west, on Sunday and yesterday, UN.
officials said. Thatemptied the hospital,
where patients had suffered for months
without adequate medicine and care.
U.N. officials said they planned to
start truck evacuations within a few
days for all residents wanting to leave
the town.
Under the cease-fire, the areais tobe
completely demilitarized within 72

hours, said aU.N. peacekeeper spokes-
person, Cmdr.BarryFrewer. Thatcould
be accomplished either by pulling out
weapons from the area or turning them
over to peacekeepers.
Serbian militiaforces were expected
to move out of the Srebrenica zone.
Muslim fighters seemed to have no
choicebutto hand over their arms.After
that, U.N. troops would be responsible
for the town's security.
"If the Serbs give up their weapons,
we will give up weapons," said Jakub
Salihovic, 35, speaking from a hospital
bed in Tuzla. "Our commander told us
the last man will die fighting."
Several of his comrades, all seated
on nearby hospital beds after evacua-
tion from Srebrenica, nodded in agree-
ment.
Even as another U.N. food convoy
arrived in Srebrenica, the leaders of
Gorazde, the largest Muslim enclave in
eastern Bosnia, appealed for relief,
Sarajevo radio reported.
The message claimed people were
dying from hunger, while the Bosnian
Serb artillery daily destroyed the
Gorazde region thatis still free. It could
not be independently confirmed.
"We appeal, we beg, we demand"
food and medicine from the United

Nations, the appeal said.
In central Bosnia, fierce fighting
continued between Muslim and Croat
forces. The two groups have fought
together against the Serbs in some ar-
eas, but have clashed in districts where
there is little Serb presence.
Bosnia's BH press agency said a
Croat artillery shell exploded in the
center of Zenica, 30 miles northwest of
Sarajevo,killing 13civiliansandwound-
ing 30. Three more died in later shell-
ing, the report said.
Col. Bob Stewart, an officer with
British U.N.peacekeepers, saidhismen
drew occasional fire as they tried to
persuade the two sides to stop battling
and attempted to evacuate civilians.
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British and French UN peacekeepers carry wounded from Srebrenica out of a helicapter at the airport near
Tuzla, Bosnia-Herzegovina, yesterday morning, as the evacuation out of the besieged Muslim enclave continues.
' sd vocates usage o
manufactured housing options

by Tim Greimel
Daily Feature Writer
Homelessness. Poverty. Urban De-
cay.
These social problems are all too
prevalent in American society today.
Researchers from the University's
School of Architecture and Urban Plan-
ning say one solution to these serious
situations may be inexpensive manu-
factured housing - better known as
mobile homes.
'There is a growing realization that,
given thehighcostofsite-builthousing,
there is a high potential for low-cost,
high-quality manufactured housing,"
said Dr. Kate Warner, director of the
research project that analyzed the feasi-
bility ofalternativemanufacturedhous-
m"g.
Manufactured, or prefabricated,
housing is built in pieces in factories
and transported to the home site, where
it is assembled.
The approximately $80,000 study
was conducted between April 1990 and
January of this year.
Finalreports are still being analyzed
by the state of Michigan's Department
~')of Commerce, which sponsored the re-
search.
The Department of Commerce had
no comment on the report.
The study's findings will be distrib-
uted to legislators, building officials
and planners.
Warnersaid she is optimistic thatthe
results will provide abasis for action by
the housing industry and the govern-
ment.
"I hope (the findings) will have an
effect. We are trying to circulate the
report as widely as possible," she said.
Warner is scheduled to make a pre-
sentation detailing the report at the
American Planning Association con-
ference inChicagothisMay. She is also
writing a series of articles for various
housing publications.
The report counters many of the
traditional arguments againstmanufac-
turedhousing, including theperception
that prefabricated homes have a lower
esale value and decrease the value of

neighboring homes.
However, some disagreementexists
about just how inexpensive manufac-
tured housing is.
Warner's report says the initial costs
of manufactured housing are "signifi-
cantly lower" than those of traditional
on-site housing and that annual/monthly
costs for rented mobile homes are com-
parable to the costs of apartments.
However, people involved with other
areas of the housing industry report
significantly different financial figures.
Dino Viscossi, supervisor of the
Design and Engineering Department at
the traditionalhome-building company
Scholz Design in Toledo, said his com-
pany sells homes for $85-95 per square
foot.
He said, although manufactured
housing is cheaper to produce, once the
cost of transportation is factored in it
costsabout$100-120per square footon
average.
On the other hand, Joe Light, senior
vice president of operations at the mo-
bile home company Champion Home
Builders in Auburn Hills, Mich., re-
ported very different prices.
He said his fim sells mobile homes
for only $35-40persquare foot. He said
he thinks conventional housing sells for
$50-60 per square foot.
Both said prices vary depending on
the location, amountof luxury, and geo-
graphical region of the homes.
Manufactured housing, which ap-
peared following World War II,reached
its peak in the 1970s.
Contrary to Warner's optimistic vi-
sion for the future of the industry, both
Viscossi and Light said the bestdays for
manufactured housing have come and
gone.
"The manufactured housing of the
'70s is pretty much outdated and passe
-it'snotusedanymore," said Viscossi.
Light expressed a similar sentiment.
"That's the peak we don't thinkwe'll
see again," he said.
Light went on to say that one big
problem with manufactured mobile
homes is the way they are perceived by
society.

"Some people still seeourhomes as
a trailer. We're still trying to overcome
the stigma of being built in afactory,"he
said.
In Michigan, most mobile home
purchasers are auto workers, Light
added.
Advocates of manufactured hous-
ing include the Wall Street Journal,
which ran an editorial in favor of the
alternative home buildiirg - concept.
Warner said the endorsement by the
conservative newspaper indicates a
growing mainstream acceptance of
manufactured housing.

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