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April 08, 1993 - Image 2

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1993-04-08

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Page 2--The Michigan Daily- Thursday, April 8,1993

STATEMENT
Continued from page 1
University will look into all riot-re-
lated incidents involving students.
"If reports are forwarded and
they contain apparent violations of
the statement, then I must investigate
them," she said.
Antieau added that reported vio-
lations do not have to come in the
form of a police report filed by DPS
or the Ann Arbor Police Department
(AAPD).
Smiley said he believed approx-
imately six. students were appre-
hended by AAPD.
In fact, any students who were

I

arrested at the riots may have been
better off had they been arrested by
AAPD.
Sgt. Richard Blake of the AAPD
said, "We have our own statutes and
laws to deal with (students who were
placed under arrest)."
Blake added that AAPD has no
involvement with the University's
statement and any student arrests
would be handled only by the Ann
Arbor courts.
He said, "We are not required,
nor do we have a policy, to report
student-related violations to the
University."
- Daily Staff Reporter Will
McCahill contributed to this report

MENTOR
Continued from page 1
mentors. The program emphasizes
inclusion of students from un-
derrepresented groups.
"(The program) really does a lot
of good," German-born Inglehart
said. "I can relate to my students
better and see what it is like to be a
student, especially for Black stu-
dents as a white faculty member."
At yesterday's luncheon, mentor
and Alumni Center Director Thomas
Richardson joked with his mentee,
"We occasionally play basketball
and he (sometimes gives) me an el-
bow in the face."
These close-knit relationships -
typical of the mentorship program
- are critical to the success of stu-
dents, especially the success of many
minority students who "often find
the University a hostile place," said
Michael Cross.
Cross, a member of the Detroit
Urban League and a University
alum, spoke to a group of about 100

faculty, administrators and students
associated with the mentorship
program.
Cross, who aids African
American men in a Detroit outreach
program that has reached nearly
45,000 youths and 15,000 adults,
delivered a speech on the need for
the University to become more ac-
cessible to African Americans.
"For many minorities, the
University of Michigan is a strange
place," Cross said.
On that theme, Cross somewhat-
jokingly said, "I brought my portable
Black oxygen Aqua Tank, to survive
here in Ann Arbor. I can only last a
few hours."
Cross sparked controversy when
he asserted, "People can only have
'social-relationships' with members
of their own races."
Richard Carter, associate dean of
students, praised the program relat-
ing a personal mentoring experience.
"One of the mentors was an instruc-
tor of mine and convinced me to stay
in education," he said.

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INCREASE
Continued from page 1
Moody added that word of mouth
from minority alumni increases
enrollment.
"When students hear from alumni
that the University's climate is re-
ceptive to them, they will come," he
said.
Moody noted that a lack of finan-
cial aid keeps many non-resident
minorityrstudents from attending.
However, Moody emphasized that
not all minority students receive fi-
nancial aid.
"That simply isn't the case,"
Moody said.
Harvey Grotrian, director of the
Office of Financial Aid, agreed with
Moody's assessment.
"We are actively concerned with
PPIH
Continued from Page 1
The department review is ex-
pected to conclude by the end of this
month so a prompt decision can be
made about the department's future.
"We have urged them to try to
get the decision in before the end of
the term," Takeshita said. "A lot of
our students will be graduating and
going off campus and some faculty
members will be going overseas."
He added, "We'd like to be able
to respond to any negative recom-
mendations and if their recommen-
dation is favorable, then we have to
worry about getting students, and it's
getting pretty late in the term."
The review committee is working
toward an April 30 deadline.

the fact that minority and economi-
cally disadvantaged students often
do not have the financial resources
to attend the University without ac-
cumulating massive amounts of
debt," Grotrian said.
Grotrian admitted that some top
minority students are attracted by
private schools that have increased
financial resources.
He added that it is "unclear"
whether the Campaign for Michigan
- the $1-billion fund-raising drive
begun in September - will increase
financial aid for non-resident
students.
Moody, while "cautiously opti-
mistic" after hearing today's figures
is not declaring victory. "We still
haven't reached the pinnacle.... We
have a ways to go."
Once the review is concluded, the
committee will present its findings
to the school's dean, its executive
committee and the University
Provost Gilbert Whitaker, who will
then make the final decision about
the fate of the department.
PPIH faculty and students first
learned of the decision to cut the de-
partment in December, in a memo
written by School of Public Health
Dean June Osborn.
The University Board of Regents
later announced that the dean and
executive committee violated the
guidelines previously approved by
the regents for the termination of a
department. The review is now being
conducted according to those guide-
lines, which state that there should
be a public forum.

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