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April 05, 1993 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1993-04-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Students' celebration of Hash Bash and the
Final Four Saturday bordered on violent. Fans
should be more responsible tonight when
celebrating.

After a long hiatus, Prince is back. Kim Yaged
reviews the Purple One's performance at the
Fox Theater this weekend.

Forty minutes stand between the Fab Five and
their first national title. That and the North Carolina
Tarheels. The Wolverines and Tar Heels square off
tonight in New Orleans for the championship.

Today
Partly sunny;
High 44, Low 26
Tomorrow
Partly cloudy; High 48, Low 38

7

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One hundred two years of editorial freedom

12,000 run
to South U
celebration
by Will McCahill
and Shelley Morrison
Daily Staff Reporters
More than 12,000 people swarmed onto South
University Avenue Saturday night in celebration of
the Michigan men's basketball team's overtime de-
feat of the Kentucky Wildcats in the semifinal game
of the NCAA tournament.
Within minutes of the game's conclusion at
around 10:30 p.m., the intersection of Church Street
and South University looked like a mosh pit, with
frantically joyful students jumping around ,and
chanting "Let's go Blue" and "We're number one."
At its height, the crowd stretched from South
Forest Street to Tappan Street.
The Ann Arbor Police Department (AAPD) mus-
tered a contingent of more than 150 officers, which
included both AAPD officers and Michigan State
Police.
The Washtenaw County Sheriff's Department
answered emergency calls for the AAPD.
Police officers began taking posts in preparation
for the anticipated crowd as early as 8 p.m., and re-
mained for the more than four-hour duration of the
game and the celebration that followed.
Several department leaders, including AAPD
Chief Douglas Smith, formed a central command
post on the rooftops of Footprints shoe store and the
China Gate restaurant.
The remainder of the officers-lined the streets
and the storefronts equipped with face shields, billy-
See CELEBRATION, Page 5

As an estimated 12,000 students celebrate Michigan's victory over Kentucky Saturday night, Engineering
sophomore Bryan Smith perches atop a lightpost on the corner of South University Avenue and Church Street.
Vitory is sweet in Big Easy

by Andrew Levy
Daily Sports Editor
NEW ORLEANS - It was a
roller-coaster ride for the fans at
the Louisiana Superdome
Saturday night as frequent lead
changes and last-minute heroics
left spectators poised at the edges
of their seats.

But in the wake of Michigan's
stunning overtime victory, the
only things more abundant than
Kentucky fans selling tickets to
tonight's game were the screams,
cheers and choruses of "The
Victors" wailed out by Michigan
fans.
"I've got the most unbelievable

feeling ever, better than the riots
in Ann Arbor," said Engineering
senior Sanjay Setty.
Setty and three of his friends
- LSA senior Gene Huh, LSA
sophomore Rich Mas, and
Engineering junior Randy Logan
- piled in a car Thursday to drive
See LOUISIANA, Page 5

Michigan forward Chris Webber attempts to shoot
over Kentucky's Rodney Dent in the Wolverines' 81-78
victory. For complete coverage, see SPORTSMonday.

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The map at left shows Wards and Precincts for the Central Campus area. The address
on your voter registration card determines where you can vote. The table below should
help you determine where to vote. You may vote only at the place printed on your
card. Questions about voting procedures should be directed to the City Clerk's office at
994-2725.

High times-not
temperatures
hit Hash Bashers

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West Quad
On the Hill
North of Huron Street
North Campus
Mary Markley Hall
Between Washtenaw & Geddes
East Quad
East of Church St.
South of Cambridge Road
South Quad
South of Hill Street
South of Hoover Street

I

1

1 2
1 3
1 7

2
2
3
3
3
4
4
4

2
3
1
,2
3
1
2
3

1

Michigan Union
Alice Lloyd Hall
Community High School
Bursley Hall
Mary Markley Halt
Angell School
East Quad
East Quad
Burns Park School
South Quad
926 Mary St.
Coliseum

Despite snow, 2,500
crowd Diag for 22nd
annual political rally/
pot-smoking fest
by David Rheingold
Daily Staff Reporter

1 2

a __

Mayoral hopefuls emphasize
housing, city- U' relationship

They came. They rallied.
when it was time to leave,

And,
they

by Jonathan Berndt
Daily City Reporter

Today Ann Arbor's registered
voters will go to the polls to
decide the future of city
government.
One of the
most influential C o u n C I
positions to be h
chosen is Ann 0
Arbor's mayor - i \4)
who basically C
serves as an at- e
large coun- s
cilmember, con- Mayoral
trols the agenda Race

the Tisch Party candidate who has
run for the council and Congress.
All the candidates pledged to
devote much attention to the Uni-
versity - the city's largest em-
ployer and landowner.
Brater, whose husband is an
English professor, said a spirit of
togetherness already exists.
"I think the relationship is sym-
biotic," she said. "The well-being
of the city of Ann Arbor is tied up
the well-being of the University of
Michigan. It's our economic base
and major employer."
Sheldon said the city has to

In terms of public facilities,
Salvette said University students
use many city services without-
paying, which irks residents.
"What is bothering the
residents is the students use a lot
of public services, that (the
residents) are paying for the
privilege of the students using the
services," she said.
Salvette also took issue with
the Statement of Student Rights
and Responsibilities, which she
called a "speech code."
"Libertarians have always been
a big defender of free speech," she

Brater

Jensen

stayed.
Some 2,500 people elbowed their
way onto the Diag Saturday for the
22nd annual Hash Bash. While many
joined the march to Fuller Park
where the event was supposed to
continue, hundreds remained on
campus for several hours.
Speakers condemned the gov-
ernment for banning marijuana use.
The throng responded with unbridled
roars of "Hemp, hemp, hooray!"
And vendors hawked T-shirts, ear-
rings and other paraphernalia. One
bumper sticker read, "I'd rather be
stoned."
The overwhelming message:
marijuana has legitimate medical
and recreational purposes, and
should be legalized.
"Mother Nature gave us mari-
ismaT ,mnn't epnavh ...k antlffhan--

JOM DEiaiiy
Police arrest a man during Hash Bash for
marijuana possession.
off-campus under the city's so-
called "pot law," campus police --
who do not uphold city ordinances
- enforced a stiffer state law that
carries a maximum one-year penalty
and $1,000 fine.
Campus police made 46 arrests
Saturday, up from 40 last year. Most
of these people were not students,

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