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March 24, 1993 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1993-03-24

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Page 2--The Michigan Daily- Wednesday, March 24, 1993

ORDINANCE
Continued from page 1
and still meet current standards."
The commission will hold a pub-
lic hearing and vote on the proposal
at its next regular meeting April 13.
The language must still be scruti-
nized by the City Attorney's office
and then approved by the City
Council before it takes effect.
The current proposal allows all
current structures to "conform" with
use regulations. The ordinance ap-
plies to new applications for excep-
tions and site plan reviews mandated
by changes to the site.
Minor modifications - which
include building garages, adding

The staff wanted to
make the regulations
more clear about what
you have to do and
when.'
- Karen Hart
city planning director
heating or cooling facilities, increas-
ing storage space, and expanding
livable space by more than 10 per-
cent of the current area or 10,000
square feet, whichever is less - are
reasons a site plan would need to be
reviewed before the Planning
Commission.

LSA
Continued from page 1
the quantitative world," he said.
LSA senior Valerie Benezra
asked what courses would be avail-
able for non-math or non-science
students, such as courses in
humanities.
Hinman mentioned a course in
linguistics. He said some courses
may have small amounts of quantita-
tive reasoning and would count for
half of the requirement.
Students also questioned the no-
tion that quantitative skills decline
during college.
"Some students have told me
they are suspicious that a student
who avoids quantitative reasoning
would have a declining quantitative
reasoning ability as quoted in the
Daily (yesterday)" Tack said.
Michael Martin, associate dean of
LSA, said the statistic came from a
study in California showing that
writing and argumentative skills in-
creased in college students, but
quantitative skills did not.
Tack then asked, "But if we al-
ready have 77 percent of the students
taking these classes, why is there an
overall decline?"
Hinman answered, "We can look
at such a thing and say we aren't do-
ing such a good job, even for stu-
dents who take these courses. If
there's one-quarter of undergradu-

ates who are managing to avoid
quantitative things, that's the group
we're addressing. That's eight- or
900 students."
One student, an LSA senior, said
the requirement seems like just one
more thing students have to worry
about when planning their courses.
"It just seems like it's getting so
limited that people who cannot find
a course that meets both this re-
quirement and distribution will have
to stay an extra semester," she said.
"I'm a senior going an extra
semester and if I had an additional
requirement, I'd be here seven
years.
LSA senior Brian Schefke, also a
member of the student government,
questioned the student-friendliness
of the University's current math
courses.
"I'm a science major and I can't
stand math. I don't think I necessar-
ily came out of (math class) any
more mathematically literate than I
came in," he said.
Hinman said, "The National
Science Foundation has been fund-
ing a calculus reform program. We
have a grant from the National
Science Foundation to implement
this change."
He said courses such as Calculus
115, which enroll about 3,200 stu-
dents annually at the University, will
be geared more toward using scien-
tific calculators, group work and
new textbooks.

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CHESTNI
SEE THEM ON SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE
On March 20 and then
SEE THEM ON THURSDAY NIGHT
LIVE at HILL
MARCH 25th 8PM

Like buttah
A local theater employee serve: popcorn to a customer before the start
of a movie yesterday.

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Perform at Michigan Men's Basketball Games !
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$15 GENERAL PUBLIC

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RUSSIA
Continued from page 1
nism.
Khasbulatov, who has accused
Yeltsin of trampling Russian law,
himself cuts blithely through the
tangle of legislative procedure.
At an emergency session Sunday
of the standing Supreme Soviet leg-
DENSON
Continued from page 1
But this Floridian no longer has
problems cataloging which clothes
visiting friends should bring. "I tell
them to bring warm things, because
anything will be cold to them,"
Denson said.
While Denson maintains a small
number of activities, she still fears
time burdens will press her to de-
crease her involvement in the March
of Dimes. She said a lot of college
students can no longer volunteer for
community service because they be-
come overwhelmed by school work
and socializing.

islature, Khasbulatov overrode the
lack of a quorum and asked law-
makers to approve a resolution re-
questing the Constitutional Court to
review Yeltsin's actions.
When the resolution failed by six
votes, several lawmakers stepped
forward and said they had forgotten
their electronic voting cards, but
favored the measure.
Denson said this pattern of
volunteering in high school might
stem from students who want
material for college ap-)lications.
While at college, students do not
have as great a concern, she added.
Denson said eventually she
would like to devote as much time to
charity as she did in high school, but
will wait until finishing college.
While she appreciates the recogni-
tion she has received over the past
few years, Denson does not feel she
deserves it.
She said, "I volunteer because I
feel like I have a responsibility to do
that. So when I'm recognized I'm
uncomfortable that others will think
I'm out for the credit."

0

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HUNGER
Continued from page 1
Refugee Project, said he will be fast-
ing for all seven days of the strike,
surviving only on a liquid diet.
"About 10 people will eat noth-
ing for seven days," he said. "Others
will fast for three to four days, some
for one day, some just for a meal."
As of last night, organizers had
recruited 124 people to participate at
some level.
Varner said there is no typical
striker. "It's not really divided along
race lines, or lines of sexual orienta-

tion," he said.-"I think it's a pretty
heterogeneous group that will be
striking."
Rev. Wendell Anthony, Detroit
National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People
president, is being recruited to speak
at the opening rally. Detroit Piston
Olden Polyneice will attend if his
schedule permits, organizers said.
Organizers expect the hunger
strike to continue to spread to other
schools. They said the next stop will
probably be the University of
Virginia or Columbia University.

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