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March 23, 1993 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1993-03-23

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The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, March 23, 1993- Page 3

I

Cisneros
projects
penonali.
into prose
by Julie Robinson
Daily Staff Reporter
To begin her reading yesterday,
ChicanaauthorSandraCisnerosapolo-
gized for her cough, which she said
resulted from too much fun ata recent
"Montezuma's Revenge" rock con-
cert in her hometown of San Antonio
- and from her habit of smoking
cigars.
Cisneros, who spoke at the
RackhamAmphitheater, stepped up to
the podium wearing a gold and black
Mexicancharrojacket-adomedwith
apurple ribbon to show solidaritywith
women suffering in the former Yugo-
slavia - and cowboy boots.
Cisneros then asked the audience
which of her works it wanted to hear.
"I won't read from'The House on
Mango Street' because I wrote it when
Iwas 23 ... I'm now 32 and I'm tired
of it," she told an understanding audi-
ence.
Through Cisneros' readings from
her book "Woman Hollering Creek,"
the audience re-lived through her
small-yet-powerful voice the trials of
being 11 years old, and the humor in
being a'Merican.
Bycreatingaccentsandnewvoices,
and moving her hands, Cisneros

'U' may give trial run to
community service plan

Hartford, Harrison
establish task force to
evaluate community
service on campus
by Nate Hurley
Daily Administration Reporter
The University has been inspired
by the Clinton administration's plan
for community service as financial aid
- and has appointed a nine-member
task force to evaluate community ser-
vice on campus.
The task force, consisting of two
students, four administrators and three
professors, will look into the state of
community service at the University.
The members hope the University will
become part of a federal plan to test
PresidentClinton's proposed program,
along with five to ten colleges this
summer.
Jeffrey Howard, director of the Of-
fice of Community Service Learning
and task force member, said the Task
Force on Community Service Learn-
ing is conducting a two-pronged inves-
tigation.
"The main purpose is to take a look
at what institutional barriers may exist
that preclude greater involvement in
community service learning," he said.
'This is arigorous task because this
University prides itself on research and
things like that and the function of this
task force and its purpose is saying the

University not only must pride itself on
its research, but also helping the com-
munity."'
"The second purpose is to look at
what exists on campus right now in the
way of community service learning."
He said this includes things that can be
done in classes, residence halls, student
organizations, and the Office of Com-
munity Service Learning.
This is a rigorous task
because this University
prides itself on research
and things like that and
the function of this task
force and its purpose is
saying the University
not only must pride
itself on its research,
but also helping the
community.'
- JeffreyHoward
director Office of
Community Service
Learning
The committee decided to apply the
University to a federal test-run pro-
gram.
"U-M is seeking to be one of those,"
he said. "Some of us are writing a grant

MICHELLE GUY/ Daly
Chicana author Sandra Cisneros speaks at the Rackham Amphitheater
yesterday. Cisneros read from her works, including "Woman Hollering
Creek," to a capacity crowd.

broughther characters alive-elicit-
ing pensive looks, nods, smiles and a
lot of laughter.
"'There are so many differentchar-
acters I want to capture," she said. "I
try to show the white population of
Americawhowe are...because we're
not a singer prancing around saying,
'I love to be in America!"'
Cisneros said she sees her typical
reader as "a person sitting across my
kitchen table who can see me in my

pajamas.
"It's the Chicana who knows ex-
actly what I'm talking about, though.
... It's really for her."
She offered advice to the many
readers who brought books for her to
sign: "The 20s can be a very sad
period for a woman but that's okay; it
only lasts 10 years. Then you hit 30
and whew!"
The audience thanked Cisneros
with a standing ovation.

that will be submitted April 1 that
would involve a few hundred U-M
students that would be in effect this
summer."
The proposal, which is still in its
early stages, will involve a few hun-
dred students working full-time eight
to ten weeks this summer. The stu-
dents will receive minimum wage and
a $1,000 stipend upon completion.
Howard said the stipend can only be
used toward education.
"It looks like it will be available at
U-M Ann Arbor, Flint and Dearborn,"
he said. "I suspect that we will get the
word out within the next weekor two."
The committee was setupby Walter
Harrison, executive director of Uni-
versity relations, and Maureen Hart-
ford, vice president for student affairs.
"My motivation was a result of
listening to the Clinton administration's
talk of national service," Harrison said.
"I had been responding to things
people in our Washington office had
sent along. I told Tom (Butts, associate
vice president for government affairs)
I would talk to Maureen," he said.
Butts is on the task force, and is
able to track developments at the na-
tional level since he is in Washington.
"Maureen and I felt this was an
excellent opportunity to combine
people on campus working internally
and those of us whose job it is to look
at it externally," Harrison said.
lice last Thursday when he discov-
eredmoneymissing from his officein
Lorch Hall.
The man told DPS officers that
three cashier's checks with a total
value of $2,204 were stolen from a
backpack in room 258 sometime in
the last two weeks.
There were no signs of forced
entry and police have no suspects in
the incident.
Computer stolen
from showcase
A computer worth more than
$4,000 was stolen from the Univer-
sity Computer Showcase last week.
The computer, a Macintosh
Powerbook portable computer, was
stolen March 17 from the Michigan
Union store. It had a total value of
$4,269.
Police have no suspects in the
theft.
-by Will McCahill
Daily Crime Reporter

*Sexual assault awareness workshops 'U' employee
arrested for
included in Greek Week '93 activities embezzlement

by Meg Biondin
Contrary to popular belief, Greek
Week is not all about bed races and
jello jumps.
Greek Week '93 is addressing the
4*oblem of sexual assault by including
a series of sexual awareness work-
shops for the first time in history.
Members of the Greek Week Steer-
ing Committee organized and devel-
oped agendas for four different work-
shops throughout the week in coordi-
nation with the Sexual Assault Preven-
tion and Awareness Center (SAPAC)
and University Health Service.
'The biggest predictor (for sexual
assault) is not affiliation, like being
Greek or an athlete, but is the involve-
ment of alcohol," said Debi Cain, di-
rector of SAPAC.
Cain added that sexual assault isno

more prevalent in the Greek system
than anywhere else.
The workshops were designed to
target various groups within the Greek
system. Pledges, active members, and
officers were invited to participate in
separate sessions focusing on issues of
sexual awareness and sexual assault.
"We want to get the message to as
many people in any way we can," said
AndreaChomakos, internal eventschair
and steering committee member.
Activities within the workshops
range from video presentations of a
situational date rape to group discus-
sions to lectures by HIV- positive guest
speakers.
Greek Week representative Anne
Skilton stressed the importance of the
workshops.
"It makes people aware that there
are certain situations that you shouldn't

get into, she said, adding, "If this infor-
mation is presented to a group, it will
help."
Cain said SAPAC welcomes fur-
ther involvement with the Greek sys-
tem in future Greek Weeks, as well as
with individual chapters.
Cain strongly advocated education
and awareness of sexual assault for
Greeks.
"We have the knowledge, experi-
ence and expertise available to the
Greek system," Cain said."We'lltailor
it to what they need, but it needs to
come from them."
Chomakos said the success of the
workshops this year will allow the
workshops to continue in the future.
"As long as we keep them interest-
ing, educational and informative, it
can get bigger and better each year,"
Chomakos said.

After a three-month investigation,
UniversityDepartmentofPublic Safety
(DPS) detectives arrested aUniversity
employee for embezzling funds.
DPS officers arrested the woman,
Patricia Davison, last Thursday after
obtaining a warrant for her arrest the
day before.
Davison worked in the PatientBill-
ing and Collection department of the
University Hospitals' Riverview Out-
patient Clinic. DPS Lt. James Smiley
said Davison allegedly embezzled
more than $500 of the University's
money.
DPS detectives, working with the
University Office of Audits, were able
to focus on a one-month period in
October and November of last year
when Davison's activity allegedly oc-
curred.
Davison was arraigned Thursday
in 15th District Court by Judge Eliza-
beth Pollard and was released on a
personal recognizance bond.
The charge - embezzlement of
more than $100 - is a felony, and if
convicted, Davison couldfaceup to 10
years injail.
One thing leads to
another
A pizzadriver gotalittle more than
he bargained for early Friday morning
when a bottle came flying out of a
South Quad window and shattered his
vehicle's windshield.
While the driver himself was not

Police9
Beat
injured, his vehicle's windshield was
completely destroyed.
The delivery person was driving
along EastMadison Street towardState
Street when the bottle struck the ve-
hicle.
DPS officers traced the bottle to a
seventh-floorroom, where they found
three students who mayhave thrown it.
One of the students was found tobe
in possession of what officers thought
to be marijuana.
Officers took statements from the
three students but made no arrests.
Less thananhourlater, South Quad
security officers made another discov-
ery of a green leafy substance they
believed to be marijuana.
The officers observed a student
pulling abag of the substance from his
pants pocket and dropping it on the
ground.
Police confiscated the substance
for analysis and searched the man,
finding an electronic beeper.
According to DPS reports, there
were no numbers stored on the beeper,
and officers did not confiscate the de-
vice.
Investigations into both incidents
are continuing.
Thieves strike it
rich at Lorch Hall
A University employee called po-

Student groups
0 AmnestyInternational,meeting,
Michigan Union, Bates Room,
7:30p.m.
. Ann Arbor Committee to De-
fend Abortion& Reproductive
Rights/National Women's
Rights Organizing Coalition,
meeting, MLB, Room B119, 6
.ip.m.
Arab-AmericanStudents' Asso-
ciation, meeting, Michigan
Union, Crofoot Room, 8 p.m.
,Q The Christian Science Organi-
zation, meeting, Michigan
League,checkroomatfrontdesk,
6:30-7:30 p.m.
U College Republicans, meeting,
{MLB, basement, 6:30 p.m.
Environmental Issues Commis-
slon~, meeting for Earth Week
1993, Michigan Union, MSA
Chambers, 6 p.m.
U GraduateEmployees Organiza-
tion, weekly meeting, 5-7 p.m.;
membershipmeeting, 8:30 p.m.;
Rackham Amphitheatre.
U In Focus, meeting, Frieze Build-
ing, Room2420,6 p.m.
0 Michigan Student Assembly,
meeting, MichiganUnion, Room
3909, 7:30 p.m.
U Newman Catholic Student Fel-
lowshipAssociation, Stations of
the Cross, 12:10 p.m.; Recon-
ciliation Seminar, 7 p.m.; RCIA
AlunniLentenGroup, 8p.m.;St.
Mary Student Parish, 331
Thompson St.
iU Social Group for Bisexual
Women, call for location and
infonnation, 763-4186, 8p.m.
O Socially Active Latino Student

Q U-MSailingTeam,meeting,West
EngineeringBuilding,Room420,
6:30 p.m.
U U-M Shotokan Karate, practice,
CCRB, small gym, 8-10 p.m.
Q University Students Against
Cancer, group meeting, Michi-
ganUnion, PondRoom,7:30p.m.
Events
Q Can Technology Change Our
Children's Understanding of
the World?, seminar, Center for
Human Growth and Develop-
ment, 300 N. Ingalls St., Room
1000, 10th Floor, 12 p.m.
Q Carillon Auditions, for spring/
summer/fall study, BurtonTower,
Room 900, 764-2539, 12:30-2
p.m.
U Center for Chinese Studies, The
Elegy on Burying a Crane and
Words on Rocks, Brown Bag
Lunch Series, Lane Hall, Com-
mons Room, 12p.m.
Q Cheap Travel for International
Students, International Center,
Room 9,4 p.m.
Q Cultural Resistance Among Af-
rican American and Latino
College Students, Center for the
Education ofWomen, 330E.Lib-
erty St.,4-5:30 p.m.
Q Electra, Playfest: Seven Plays in
Seven Days, Frieze Building,
Arena Theatre, 5 p.m.
Q Harpsichord Studio Recital,
School of Music, Blanche Ander-
son Moore Hall, 8 p.m.
O Let It Begin Here, movie, spon-
sored by the Peace Corps, Inter-
national Center, Room 7,7 p.m.
Q New Forms of Property and

Asia Lecture/ Seminar Series,
Museumof Anthropology, Room
4032,3-5 p.m.
U Object Lesson, Cruikshank's
Dancers: Craft and Caricature,
Art Museum, Information Desk,
12:10 p.m.
U The Palestinian Situation: A
Personal Perspective, Interna-
tional Forum Tuesday Lunch,
International Center, 12 p.m.
Q Presentation by Children of
Chernobyl Relief Fund, Michi-
gan Union, Kuenzel Room, 12-1
p.m.
U The Role of Abortion as a Politi-
cal Issue, A Discussion of How
Abortion Has Affected America's
Legal and Political Systems,
Lorch Hall, Room 140, 7:30p.m.
Q Universtiy Symphony Orches-
tra/University Philharmonic,
Hill Auditorium, 8 p.m.
U The Uses of Stigma: Intellectu-
als and National Identity in
Romania, lecture, Haven Hall,
Room 4633, 4 p.m.
Student services
Q Bone Marrow Testing Drive,
Lawyer's Club, 12-4 p.m.
U ECB Student Writing Center,
Angell Hall, Computing Center,
7-11 p.m.
U Northwalk Safety Walking Ser-
vice, Bursley Hall, 763-9255, 8
p.m.-1:30 a.m.
U Peer Counseling, U-M Counsel-
ing Services, 764-8433,7 p.m.-8
a.
U Psychology Undergraduate Peer
Advising, Department of Psy-

U

F

Pocket Money

From NBD's Cash Dispensing ATM
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. Conveniently located on the northeast corner
of South University and East University.
" Get cash, check balances, obtain mini-statements,

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