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March 18, 1993 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1993-03-18

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily-Thursday, March 18,1993

U.N.

convoys offer supplies to Bosnia

SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina
(AP) - Serbs eased their blockade of
U.N. relief convoys yesterday, allow-
ing three intodevastated eastern Bosnia.
Tank, artillery and mortar fire shook
Sarajevo's airport and Bosnian forces
cut a vital Serb supply route.
Intemational efforts to send aid to
Muslims in Serb-overrun eastern en-
claves remained troubled. Four people
were reported killed in besieged
Srebrenicaas gun and knife fights broke
out among hungry crowds trying to
reach food bundles dropped by U.S.

planes.
"The town has been besieged for 11
months. The authorities are too physi-
cally and mentally exhausted to rein
people in," U.N. aid spokesperson Peter
Kessler said in Sarajevo.
In Washington, the State Depart-
ment accused ethnic Serbs of bombing
Srebrenica last Saturday in thefirst aerial
attack on the former Yugoslav republic
since last fall.
Bosnian Serbs, under U.N. pres-
sure, gavepermission forthree convoys
of the U.N. High Commissioner for

Refugees to cross into Bosnia from
Serbia Two bound for Sarajevo and
Gorazde to the southeast crossed the
border at Mali Zvornik, but the third
decided itwas too late to head for Tuzla.
Serbs continued to block another
convoy, which was trying to reach
Srebrenica.
The Bosnian Army's 1st Corps said
there was very heavy shelling yesterday
on all sides of the Sarajevo airport,
forcing the cancellation of some relief
flights.
About 2,000 shells landed on Butmir,
Hrasnica and Dobrinja, three govern-
ment-held towns around the airport,
killing at least two people, Bosnian
radio said.
In Sarajevo, the government said 25

peoplewerekilled inBosnian-controlled
territory in the 24-hour period ending
yesterday afternoon.
Bosnian governmentsoldiers cut the
main supply road from the Serbian bor-
der at Zvornik to Pale, the Bosnian
Serbs' headquarters outside of Sarajevo,
according to the Yugoslav news agency
Tanjug. The troops killed three Serb
soldiers in a surprise raid, the agency
said.
Kessler, a UNHCR official, quoted
co-worker Larry Hollingworth in
Srebrenica as saying there was savage
fighting among people seeking to get at
airdropped food bundles.
Hollingworth said the local hospital
reported that at least four people were
killed in gun and knife fights.

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Let's limbo
Greek Week activities included a limbo competition yesterday on the
Ding.
Government report reveals
economy may be improving

SOUNDSTAGE
MICHIGAN UNION TICKETt
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$15 GENERAL PUBLIC

WAS!-IINGTON (AP) - Inflation
slowed in February, but it still worried
sOme analysts because the largest price
increases came in goods that are nor-
mally the most stable.
Nevertheless,mostbelieve thatgov-
ernmentfigures released yesterday show
consumer prices under control. And
another government report made clear
the industrial sector of the economy
continues to grow.
The Labor Department reported a

moderate 0.3 percent increase in its
ConsumerPriceIndex inFebruary.That
was down from the 0.5 percent jump in
January, which was the largest increase
since 0.6 percent in January 1991.
The governmentattributedaquarter
of the overall February increase to ap-
parel prices which shot up 1.5 percent
during the month.
Apparel prices are part of the nor-
mally more 'stable core inflation rate,
which excludes volatile food and en-
ergy prices.

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SUPERCUTS.
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Passover Meals
Dead ine March 22
Tues, Aril 6 to Tues, April 13
1st Seder - Monday, April 5
2nd Seder - Tuesday April 6
Home Hospitality is available for the seders. Hillel
will serve lunch and dinner each day of Passover
except for the seders. The deadline for reservations
and payment is March 22 by 4:30 pm at Hillel,1429
Hill Street.
For more information call Hillel, 769-0500
HI1lll

GEORGIA
Continued from page 1
not act in place of the University Board
of Regents. For this reason, Cole said
she does not believe the state Open
Meetings Act applies.
"Here (an appeal) goes on up to an
appellate board that makes a decision,"
she said.
David Schwartz, president of the
campusAmerican Civil Liberties Union,
also said the Georgia ruling is unlikely
to have a great impact elsewhere.
"The law as it comes down in Geor-
gia might be persuasive, but it wouldn't
be controlling," he said.
But he added that the University is
being too confidential about the five
cases filed under the statement and has
been "misinterpreting the privacy rights
of students for a long time."
Antieau said it is too early to make
judgments about the confidentiality of
cases under the statement, since no tri-
als have begun.
One case has gone to mediation and
four are being investigated.

MSA
Continued from page 1
want to," said LSA sophomore Andy
Draganski.
Other students said they felt elec-
tions are important.
"I voted because I felt responsible.
It's my school and I should do every-
thing I can to be a part of it," said LSA
first-year student Jeff Wechsler.
CARD
Continued from page 1
trial examination Mar.24 or face a $200
fine.
Ilammond faces two charges: one
count of stealing or retaining a financial
device - the Entr6e Plus card - with-
out consent, and one count of illegal
sale or use of the card.
Both charges are felonies and each
carries amaximum penalty of four years
in jail and/or a $ 2,000 fine.
Ilunmond's case has been assigned
to the Washtenaw County public
defender.

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6

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KOREAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION.

c "

esents a
KOREAN
CULTURAL
ARTS
FESTIVAL
Sunday, March 21
Michigan Union

3DORA STAFF

hDu!

NEWS Melissa Peerless, Managing Editor
EDITORS: Hope Ca' ati Lauren Oermner, Karen Sabgir, Punri Shah _
STAFF: Adam Anger, Jonathan Bemdt James Cho, Kerry Cdligan, Kenneth Dancyger, Angda Daneby, Jan DiMasdoM. iidele
Fricke, Mike Goecke. Soma Gupta. Grey Hoey. Nate Hurley, Salorn Janveqa, Sarah Kiimo. Megan Lardkter, Robn tUbein, Peter
Matthews, WIll McCahdl. Bryn Micd.., Sheley Morrion, Mona Qureshi, David Rhaeingold. David Sheardson. Jennt ifer t~berg,
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GRAPHICS STAFF: David Acton, Jonathan Bsrmdt
OPINION Erin Einhom, Editor
STAFF: Julie Beder, Oliver Giancoa. Sam Goodstein, Parik Javid, Judith Kaha (Editorial Assistant). Jasonlichtstlin (Eitoial
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Mitvaksky. John Niyo, AntHne Pitta, Mike Raicno, Tim Rardin, Michael Roaenberg, Jaeeon Ro ented, Chad Satran. Tim Spot,
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ARTS Jessie Halladay, Aaron Hamburger, Editors
EDITORS: Megan Abbott (Fmr), Car" A. Bacon (Theater). Meissa Ross Bemardo (Weekend etc.),Nima Hodael(Weekend etcj,
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STAFF: Erik Angerreer, Anastasa Baricoki Josh Dei, Susan ?soak, Douglas Kanter, Elzabelh Lppman, Heather Lovanar,
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C

3 pm, Pendleton Rm
Poetry Reading & Arts Exhibition
Professor Sae-Hyon Park
Dr.C hong-Gil Mah
7 pm, Ballroom

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