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January 06, 1993 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1993-01-06

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The Michigan Daily- Wednesday, January 6, 1993 -Page 3

I

City may
*boycott
anti-gay
states
by Christine Young
Daily City Reporter
The City Council Monday tabled
a proposed resolution that would
prohibit the city from doing business
with states that have laws discrimi-
nating on the basis of sexual
orientation.
The resolution, proposed by
Councilmember Robert Eckstein (D-
5th Ward), states that Mayor Brater
would direct City Administrator
Alfred Gatta and City Attorney
Elizabeth Schwartz to prepare a list
of states and municipalities that
have laws, charter amendments or
ordinances that limit the civil rights
of citizens based on their sexual
orientation.
The resolution was made in re-
sponse to the recent passage of an
amendment in Colorado prohibiting
laws and ordinances that protect the
civil rights of individuals based on
their sexual orientation.
Under the resolution, the mayor
and council would not permit the
expenditure of funds for travel to
and from any state or municipality
appearing on the list. Additionally,
the city would prohibit business con-
tracts with vendors, suppliers, con-
sultants and sub-contractors on the
list.
"The thing that bothers me more
then anything is that people cannot
claim that they have been discrimi-
nated against based on their sexual
orientation," Eckstein said.
"This will not improve the run-
ning~ of Ann Arbor but it will send a
message to other states and cities
who are considering similar legisla-
tion," he added.
Councilmember Larry Hunter
(D-1st Ward) argued that developing
a list of states and municipalities
with legislation that discriminates
.against an individual's sexual
orientation would be an arduous
'task.
Eckstein responded by stating
that the federal government already
has a list that is being sent to the
:City Administrator. He stated that
this list would provide the council
with valuable information, making
their task easier.
Councilmnber Kurt Zimmer
;(D- 4th Ward) compared the resolu-
tion with the boycotts made on
South Africa by the United States.
"This is a parallel situation with
South Africa. It is important that we
take a stand. If that means dropping
financial analysts and the New
Yorker, then I'm all for it," Zimmer
said.
Peter Nicolas (D-4th Ward)
stated that the resolution should be
more broad-based pertaining to indi-
vidual businesses.
"Colorado certainly has busi-
nesses and industries that discrimi-
pate against individuals based on
their sexual orientation but the state
also has businesses that do not dis-
criminate. That is why I support

boycotting individual businesses as
9pposed to the entire state," Nicolas
said.
Councilmnember Peter Fink (R-
2nd Ward) said the resolution was
iot a local issue. He emphasized that
councilmembers should "think
twice" before putting forward their
personal beliefs.
The council tabled the resolution
and will continue discussion next
week in a working session.

Facultypresents salary
grievances to regents
by Jennifer Silverberg Jensen said SACUA is looking at and the administration if used
Daily Administration Reporter establishing faculty panels for the vehicle to injure and nprote m

as a
oliti-

The University Board of Regents
agreed to discuss new means of
compensation in response faculty
grievances over salary freezes.
Ejner Jensen, Chair of the Senate
Advisory Committee on University
Affairs (SACUA), and John
Tropman, Chair of the Committee on
the Economic Status of the Faculty
(CESF) spoke to the regents at its
December meeting.
Tropman presented an Invitation
to a Conversation about
Compensation from CESF - a
group responsible for representing
faculty compensation needs And
concerns.
The proposal suggested "that we
jointly - Regents, Executive
Officers, and Faculty - look at the
whole issue of compensation for
faculty and others at the (University)
and begin to explore ways to make
our compensation system more
imaginative, more focused, and more
relevant to the needs of all
concerned."
Tropman added that this is the
first year the University has lacked a
program of salary increments and he
said faculty and staff would like the
University to reinstate funds for a
salary program for 1993-94.
"(Provost and Vice President for
Academic Affairs) Gil Whitaker
calls it a revenue diet but we think of
it as a revenue fast," Tropman said.
"Perhaps it's time for us all to think
about how we should be paid."
Whitaker said he approved of the
proposal..
"We welcome the opportunity to
open up the range of possibilities to
think of coinpensat ion more broadly
than we have in the past," Whitaker
said.
In his report, Jensen briefed the
regents on the activities of SACUA,
a nine-member elected executive
committee of the Senate Assembly,
an elected bodly representing faculty.

judicial system created by the
Statement of Student Rights and
Responsibilities and is exploring the
idea of faculty evaluations of
administrators.
Regent Deane Baker (R-Ann
Arbor) expressed some concern
about the proposal.
"I have some reservations about
that and carried to the extreme it will
build a fence between the faculty

cal ends," Baker said.
But Jensen said administrators
should be held to the same stringent
evaluations as faculty.
"I'm acutely aware that there are
dangers in evaluations of any kind,
but I'd be remiss if as a member of
the faculty I didn't say, we get eval-
uated every day, at the end of the
term, when our salaries are decided,
at promotion and tenure time."

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while you serve your career.
USAF HEALTH PROFESSIONS
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-:I as

Back to the books
First-year LSA student and Alpha Phi Omega pledge Michael Hackett
works at the Student Book Exchange. Books can be sold between 11 a.m.
and 6 p.m. today and tomorrow at the Pendleton Room in the Michigan
Union. Books can be purchased at the same place between Jan. 8 and 11.

'U' prof.
to reforn
by David Shepardson
Daily Government Reporte
During the presidential ca
President-elect Clinton pro
focus like a "laser beam'
economy.
In keeping with thatr
University Prof. Mari
Neumann Whitman was one
of a diverse group of citizen
ing Clinton's first public di
on economic problems in D
Whitman, a distinguished
professor of business admin
and public policy at the U. ni
business school, attended t
Rock conference not sim]
professor but as a represen
"government, industry and
demics," she said.
A former vice presidenti
economist for the General
corporation, Whitman has
five presidents on the e
During the Nixon admini
she served on the Cou
Economic Advisors.
In light of her experien
ambassador-designate and e
conference organizer Micke
called Whitman and pe
asked her to attend.
Compared to other e
conferences Whitman hasa
she said Clinton's conferen
broader focus, yet failed to p
clear view of Clinton's
actions.
However, Whitman s
conference established Clint
economic authority.
"Clinton seems to have
sense that there are choi
tradeoffs to be made. II
strong grasp of economic
leading discussion for some
over 2 days," she said.
Nobel Laureate an

urges Clinton
U.S. economy
Professor James Tobin - who also
r attended - agreed with Whitman's
ampaign, assessment that the conference did
mised to not reveal what economic policies
on the the Clinton administration would
implement.
promise, "The conference didn't answer
na von the questions of what economic pol-
member icy Gov. Clinton would follow.
s attend- Rather it was to enlighten his group
scussion and the whole U.S. public about the
ecember. economny," Tobin said.
d visiting Whitman added that the confer-
istratiOo ence was one of the most diverse she
versity's had attended. In addition to being
he Little geographically and ethnically di-
ply as a verse, many women were in
tative of attendance.
the aca- Health care.was a key issue at the
conference.
and chief "It is critical to resolve the health
1 Motors care crisis in a way that would rec-
advised tify the disproportionate burden
conomny. currently carried by many large tra-
stratioin, ditional manufactures," Whitman
ncil of said.
In her statement at the confer-
ce, trade ence, Whitman opposed protection-
conomic ism and urged adoption of the North
y Kantor American Free Trade Agreement
rsonally and completion of the Uruguay
round of the General Agreement on
conomic Tariffs and Trade. She said
attended, "siepped-up productivity growth is
ce had a the only policy consistent with
provide a maintaining high wages and
future restoring the growth of real wages
here at home."
;aid the Whitman said there is "honest
ton as an disagreement" about whether a fed-
eral spending is necessary to stimu-
a strong late the economy.
ces and During the campaign, Clinton
e had a supported a plan to revitalize the
issues, economy, that included emphasis on
21 hours increased infrastructure spending.
At the conference, Tobin urged a
d Yale stimulus package of $60 to $80 bil-

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I I

Choo
4 seni
~. ,' ' tals
\ f the
x ar
neer. Ta
year or
while engineering courses a
Mark Your Calendar.I
FE exam is administered ev
April and October. Your state
board or engineering dean o
you when and where. Sendi
exam application today.

Student groups
Q Newman Catholic Student As-
sociation, Centering Prayer; 7
p.m.; Education Commission,
7:00 p.m.; U-M Catholic Stu-
dent Fellowship, 7 p.m.; Saint
Mary Student Chapel, 331 Th-
ompson St.
Q Social Group for Lesbians, Gay
Men, and Bisexuals, meeting,
East Quad, check room at front
desk, 9 p.m.
Q Shorin-Ryu Karate-Do Club,
practice, CCRB, Martial Arts

Hall, Room 2439, 8 p.m.
Q U-M Amnesty International,
meeting, East Quad, Room 122,
7 p.m.
Q U-M Ninjitsu Club, practice,
I.M. Building, Wrestling Room
G21, 7:30-9 p.m.
Events
Q Deadline, apply for exchange pro-
gram at professional schools in
Moscow, St. Petersburg, or
Krasnoyarsk, contact Ann
Monterio, 763-3174, or Profes-

by the U-M Asian American Stu-
dent Coalition, Michigan Union
Art Lounge, through January 29.
U Warriors from Xian, art exhibit,
Museum of Art, through Janu-
ary 17.
Student services
U Northwalk Safety Walking Ser-
vice, Bursley Hall, lobby, 763-
WALK, 8 p.m.-1:30 a.m.
D Psychology Undergraduate
Peer Advising, Department of
Pcvr ,nXnJv Wp Ow ') r n

Qse Registration. College PE Pass the FE Exam Now.
ors can take the Fundamen- -- Earning your engineering degree
of Engineering (FE) exam- , and passing the FE exam qualifies you
e first formal step in becoming as an engineer-in-training or EIT-a
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ire still fresh in our mind. and its high standards of practice.
Later, as a professional engineer, you'll enjoy the bene-
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I Please send me the free brochure:. (
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Namee
IColege .S

W,

II I

1

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