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March 11, 1993 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1993-03-11

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Hockey
vs. Notre Dame
Tomorrow, Saturday and Sunday, 7 p.m.
Yost Ice Arena

SPORTS

Men's and Women's Diving
at NCAA Zone C Diving Championships
Tomorrow and Saturday, 10 a.m.
Canham Natatorium

mmoogrorrapp.T.T

-rsai MarchF~?~~ IE . 1, 9

WAAi/

Blue, stirred but not shaken, holds on

rKi3DX _

*FULL COURT.
PRESS

Rose, Webber crash Illini
Champaign bash, 98-97

Cagers bring out best
in Fighting Illini*

.dilkk

'by Andy De Korte
Daily Basketball Writer
CHAMPAIGN - After Mich-
igan beat Michigan State in overtime
last Sunday everyone agreed the
Spartans had played their best game
of the season.
Assembly Hall smacked of the
same feelings last night. The
Wolverines started the game shoot-
ing a woeful 3-for-15 to fall to a 29-
14 deficit. But when the overtime
buzzer sounded and the ball hit the
floor for the last time, Michigan had
overcome another team's best
performance.
Of course, the Wolverines will be
expecting the best from their
opponents in the tournament so it's
good to learn how to deal with it
now. Michigan has enough exper-
*ience to know how important games
like this are to rebuild motivation
and focus.
"No doubt," senior Eric Riley
said. "I'm glad we had a game like
this. It's our second in a row."
"It's definitely nice (to have a
game like this)," forward Chris
Webber said. "There's not as much
at stake because of one game and
you're out. The last three games,
starting with Iowa, Michigan State in
overtime and this game is the best

type of preparation for the tourna-
ment."
Although the sluggish start had
no easy explanation, it could not
have been focus.
Early this week a story was
reported of Wolverine point guard
Jalen Rose being in a drug house last
October. Although nothing came of
it, the story received national
attention.
No one involved with the
Wolverines wanted to talk about
Rose's situation but it had an impact
on the game. However, it was not
because Rose or any Wolverine
thought or talked about it. Only after
the Illini crowd forced the issue did
it have an impact.
Heard in the first half were cries
of "crack house" and "Just say no,"
Rose exploded with 15 second half
points and led the team with 23
points.
"I heard it but it didn't really
phase me," Rose said. "We all
picked it up ... it was just like some-
one doggin' me and I want to prove
them wrong."
His friend and teammate Webber
agreed saying the worst thing the
opposing team can do is get on
Michigan. He can certainly count on
See ILLINOIS, Page 8

by Ken Sugiura
Daily Basketball Writer
CHAMPAIGN - He ruined the
evening for the sellout Assembly
Hall crowd who wanted to get him
off his game. They yelled, "Just say
no! Just say no!" while he shot free
throws. He sank them, and then he
pointed at them.
"People were saying things, try-
ing to throw him off his game,"
Michigan guard Jimmy King said of
his embattled teammate.
He ruined the evening for
Illinois' guards, who, try as they
might, could not contain him. He
connected on eight of 20 shots from
the floor for a team-high 23 points.
"He's really good. We couldn't
get our second guards to play him
the way we wanted to play him,"
Illini coach Lou Henson said. "But
he's good. What can you say?"
And Jalen Rose ruined the night
for the Illini seniors, who played
their final contest at Assembly Hall
last night. Rose owned the overtime
period, scoring six of Michigan's 15
points to lead the Wolverines to a
98-97 nail-biter over Illinois.
"It didn't surprise me at all,"
Michigan center Juwan Howard
said. "If you look back at every
game, Jalen steps up to the chal-
lenge."
Heck, he might have even per-
turbed teammate Michael Talley, as
Rose played all 45 minutes to keep
the backup point guard on the bench.
In the overtime, Michigan (14-3
Big Ten, 24-4 overall) broke a 91-
all deadlock with a Jimmy King
three-pointer from the top of the key
with 53 seconds remaining. From
that point on, the Wolverines stayed
one step ahead of the hot-shooting
Illini (11-6, 18-11) to come away
with the victory.
Rebounding seemed to be the key
for Michigan in overtime and in the
game. The Wolverines owned a 21-
10 edge on the offensive glass, led
by Chris Webber's seven offensive
boards, and an overall 42-28 advan-
tage. It provided enough of a cushion
to offset the Fighting Illini's .573
shooting from the floor. Illinois
forward Andy Kaufmann led all
scorers with 27 points.
In the extra period, after King
sank two free throws to boost the
lead to five points, 96-91, the Illini
mounted a furious drive, but they
came up shy.
"All we had to do was be a little
bit better and we win the ballgame,
but we couldn't get it done," Henson
said.

2.4 seconds left, around Rose's two
free throws to make the score 98-97.
Following an Illini timeout,
Michigan inbounder Howard lobbed
the ball toward the Michigan free
throw line. Illinois' T.J. Wheeler
picked it off and fired the ball down-
court to Keene.
Keene fumbled up a shot.
Remarkably, the ball caromed off
the backboard through the net, but
time had run out.
"When time's running out, you

Webber

Jalen Rose defends Illinois' Andy Kaufmann during the first half in
Champaign, Ill. Michigan squeaked past the Illini in overtime, 98-97.

Men netters to challenge national foes in Knoxville

can't fumble the ball," Henson said.
The Wolverines, as Fisher had
feared prior to the game, came out
flat after an emotion-filled overtime
win last Sunday against Michigan
State. Michigan fell behind at the
outset, 25-14, before making a
charge to tie the game at the half,
40-40.
Regulation ended with the score
tied, 83-83.
MICHIGAN (98)
FO FT Rb.
Min. M-A Ml-A O-T A F Pts.
Webber 38 7-17 8-10 7-14 3 4 22
Jackson 30 2-5 0-0 2-3 4 4 4
Howard 36 7-14 4-4 3-5 3 4 18
Rose 45 8-20 6-8 2-8 2 2 23
King 39 4-9 8-9 3-6 2 4 17
Pelinka 17 2-4 0-0 2-3 0" 0 6
Voskuil 6 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Riley 14 3-4 2-2 0-1 1 4 8
Totals 225 33-73 28-33 21-42 15 22 98
FG%- .452. FT%- . 848. Three-point goals:
4-12, .333 (King 1-4. Rose 1-4, Pelinka 2-2,
Webber 0-2). Team rebounds: 2. Blocks: 1
(Weber). Turnovers: 9 (Webber 5, Howard 2.
King,Rose). Steals: 6 (King 4, Jackson Rose).
Technical fouls: none.

by Bob Abramson
Daily Sports Writer
Forget about Graceland, Al Gore
and the Grand Ole' Opry. This
weekend, the men's tennis team has
its mind focused on the Tennessee
Volunteer Classic, its final preseason
tune-up before the Big Ten season.
The Classic, a dual-meet tourna-
ment held in Knoxville, will include
hosts Tennessee, No. 25 Virginia
Commonwealth, South Florida,
Wake Forest, Tulsa, and Big Ten-ri-
val Michigan State. Unfortunately
for the Wolverines, they were dealt
the Volunteers - the second-ranked
team in the country - in the first
round of the tournament.
"This is an opportunity to see if
we can compete with a top five team
in the country," Michigan assistant
coach Dave Goldberg said. "I think
we match up pretty well with them,
and we have a definite chance to win
the match."
* I So far this season, the Wol-
verines (2-2 overall) have held their
own against some top-flight com-
petition. Despite the fact that sixth-
ranked Texas crushed Michigan 7-0,

the Wolverines put up a fight against
No. 19 Texas A&M, before losing 4-
3 to the Aggies.
"Texas showed us that we are not
a top ten team," Goldberg said. "But
we are certainly about 15th to 20th
in the country on any given day."

Despite the so-so start, Goldberg
sees improvement in the team's play.
"We have had a pretty good year
so far," Goldberg said. "Our best
match came at Texas A&M, and all
of our guys have performed well,

especially at the Spartan Invit-
ational."
Michigan opens up its Big'Ten
season at home April 3 and 4 against
Ohio State and Indiana, two of the
top squads in the conference.

ILLINOIS (97)

Women's tennis returns to action at Rice

by Felippe Moncarz
The Michigan women's tennis
team hopes to rebound from two
consecutive loses when it begins
play today in the three-day Rice
University Invitational Tournament
in Houston, Texas.
The Wolverines (1-0 Big Ten, 2-
2 overall) enter the Rice Tournament
after a two-week layoff from com-
petitive play. During spring break,
the team lost to South Florida and
Florida State in dual matches.
Michigan coach Bitsy Ritt sees
the tournament as a prime opportu-
nity for the team to develop consis-
tent play as it heads into the brunt of
the Big Ten women's tennis season.

"We struggled quite a bit during
our Florida road trip," Ritt said.
"This tournament gives us a chance
to regroup before we hit the hardest
part of our schedule."
The Rice Invitational is a seven-
team tournament that also includes
Colorado, Kansas State, Northeast
Louisiana, Tulane, South Alabama,
and host Rice. The tourney will be in
dual-match format with the winning
teams advancing and the losing ones
entering the consolation bracket.
Ritt believes that this tournament
will be very competitive, although

none of the participating teams are
nationally ranked.
Ritt has completely revamped
Michigan's doubles lineup for the
tournament in an effort to improve
the poor showings that the doubles
teams had in Florida.
"This will be one of the last
chances to evaluate which doubles
teams work the best for us," Ritt
said. "I've been pleased with what I
have seen the last two weeks in
practice concerning doubles, so
hopefully we will redeem ourselves
from our past performances."

Bennett
Kaufmann
Thomas
Taylor
Keene
Harris
Clemons
Michael
Davidson
Wheeler

Min.
36
40
43
19
25
30
1
10
20

FO
M-A
2-4
10-18
9-13
2-2
6-11
0-0
4-11
0.0
0-0
2-2

PT
M1-A
1-2
3-3
6-10
0-0
3-4
0-0
3-4
0-0
0-1
0-0

Rob.
o-T
3-6
0-d
2-6
1-1
2-3
0-0
2-3
0-0
0-2
1-2

A
2
2
1
6
i
0
1
0
i
5

il-A WA T AF Pts.
2-4 1-2 3- 2 25
3 24
2
9-1 6-0 2 1 3 24
2-2 0-0 0 6 02
6-11 3-4 - I 3 19
0 0
0-0 0-0 0 3 0

I-

I

a t 0

Totals 225 35-61 16--24 10-28 20 25 97
FG%- .574. FT%- .667. Three-point goals:
11-19, .579 (Keene 4-9, Kaufmann 4-.,Wheeler
2-2. Taylor 1-1, Clemons 0-1). Team rebounds:
1. Blocks: 2 (Bennett. Thomas). Turnovers: 13
(Kaufmann 7, Wheeler 2, Clemons, Davidson,
Taylor, Thomas). Steals: 5 (Bennett, Clemons,
Keene, Taylor, Wheeler). Technical fouls: none.
Michigan......40 43 15 --9
Illinoisb........-40 43 14 97
At Assembly Hall; A-16, 321

F1

Illini rookie guard Richard Keene
sandwiched a pair of three-point
bombs, the second a 30-footer with

-.,

I U .mNWWE

~-

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