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January 11, 1993 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 1993-01-11

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Page 10 -The Michigan Daily - Monday, January 11, 1993

Swimmers breeze past
Northwestern, 183-114

'M' stars shine in

fy
,f.

by Charlie Breitrose
Daily Sports Writer
The matchup of the top two
women's swimming teams in the
Big Ten showed that things haven't
changed. The Michigan women
turned in an impressive performance
and proved, in front of family and
friends, that they are still the power
of the conference.
"We're the kind of team that
knows when the money is on the
table, and (we) respond to it,"
Michigan coach Jim Richardson
said.
But that was not the only inspira-
tion for the swimmers. -Many of
them had parents in the stands for
the annual Parents Weekend.
Northwestern came in with a
young, talented team but were not
able to meet the test. Michigan won
with suprising ease, outscoring the
Wildcats,183-114.
"I was surprised with the score of
the meet ... we heard that North-
western was coming in to challenge
is," said sophomore breaststroker
Lara Hooiveld. "They were sup-
posed to be the strongest contender
for us."
The Wildcats looked strong in
the short- and middle-distance
freestyle events, but they could not
compete with Michigan in the other
strokes. The Wolverines swept the
fop three spots in the 1000-yard
freestyle, 100 breaststroke, and the.
200 breaststroke.
Coach Jim Richardson was
pleased with his team's perfor-
mance.
"Everyone swam at least one
thing well," said Richardson.
.Mindy (Gehrs) won three events;
she's tough."

Gehrs won the 100 and 200 but-
terfly, as well as the 400 individual
medley. There were three other
multi-event winners for Michigan:
Kathy Deibler (200 and 500
freestyle), Alecia Humphrey (100
and 200 backstroke), and Hooiveld
(100 and 200 breaststroke).
Hooiveld was also enthusiastic
about the win.
"Everyone got in and put in solid
swims, considering the conditions,"
Hooiveld said.
The Wolverines had been back
from Hawaii for only three days, and
had endured hard workouts since
returning to Ann Arbor.
"We trained honestly the last
few days, putting in 14,000 yards a
day," Richardson said.
Michigan dominated more than
just the swimming events. The
divers turned in a solid performance,
taking the top four places in the one-
meter event, and the top three in the
three-meter diving. The two events
were won by senior Margie Stoll and
junior Cinnamon Woods, respec-
Lively.
Northwestern coach Kathie
Wickstrand was impressed by the
Wolverines.
"This is the fastest dual meet
we've swam this year," said Wick-
strand. "They are very strong. Lots
of the people you saw in the pool to-
day you will find in the in the final
heat in Big Tens."
However, she was still pleased
with her team's performance and
expects a better performance at the
Big Tens.

internatio
by Brett Forrest
Daily Hockey Writer
CHICAGO - Moscow, Russia.
Davos, Switzerland. Albany, New
York. Gavle, Sweden. These locales
(with the exception of Albany) may
seem prime vacation spots to some.
For six Wolverines, though, they
were anything but that. These were
the sites for four different interna-
tional tournaments during the holi-
day season.
David Roberts, David Oliver and
Cam Stewart spent some down time
at the site of last year's college
hockey championship (Albany) for
the USA Cup. Stewart and Oliver
played for the Canadians while
Roberts was one of the few Mid-
western players on Tim Taylor's
USA club. The competition pitted
Canada, the United States and Rus-
sia against each other in a round-
robin format. Russia came out on
top, winning both of its games.
"In terms of confidence, it was
huge," said Oliver, who was named
to the all-tournament team with two
goals and one assist in the two
games. "Cam (Stewart) and I gained
a lot of confidence. It proves we can
play with the best players in college
hockey. It is a good experience to
look back on if I get down later in
the year."
Stewart played on the same line
with Oliver in Albany and finished
with three assists. Since the USA
Cup, Stewart has been on fire. He
captured the MVP award in the
Great Lakes Invitational - with
three goals and two assists in two
games - just one week after the
Cup. The international competition
seems to have been the key to his
improved play.
"Dave (Oliver) and I were to-
gether for about a week," Stewart
stated. "'He told me that confidence
is the key to scoring, just believing
in it. I got some confidence in the
USA Cup and then brought it right
in for the GLI."
A big part of the USA Cup expe-
rience for Oliver and Stewart was
the realization that they had been
chosen to represent their country in
an international competition.
"Everyone dreams of playing for
their country," Stewart said. "Ollie
and I were in the dressing room be-
fore the first game and we went to
get a drink out in the hall. We
looked in the mirror and saw the
Canadian sweaters we were wearing.
We just got chills down our spines."
Roberts had quite a different im-
pression of the tournament. He was
held scoreless on the wide-open in-
ternational ice surface.
"It wasn't as great as I thought it

nal play "
was going to be," he admitted. "I
didn't play well. It was very frustrat-
ing, but I was on the ice all the time.
I kept my legs for the GLI."
David Harlock sported the reds
and white for Canada in the vaunted
Izvestia tournament in Moscow. The
competition included eight interna-
tional squads. The Canadians fin-
ished a disappointing seventh, but:
the Michigan captain found the ex- *
perience a valuable one.
"It gave me a lot of confidence,"
he said. "I played against some of
the best players the world has to of-
fer. You get used to a higher tempo.
game and when you come back to;
the CCHA you tend to make plays
quicker."
For fellow defenseman Aaron
Ward, the time spent in a different.
continent was more than he ex-
pected. The junior from Gloucester
Ont. pulled on the maple-leafed
sweater in Davos for the famed
Spangler Cup Tournament.
The Spangler teams are made up
of both professionals and amateurs'
and Ward had the chance to play;
with and against the likes of former
NHL players such as Brian Propp,
Mats Naslund and Hakan Loob.
"It was exciting playing with
guys I grew up watching on TV,",
Ward said. "I would be skating with
them and when we came off the ice
they would give me a compliment
on a good play I'd made."
'Ward also enjoyed the obvious
enthusiasm of the Swiss crowd.
"(The fans) would get there an
hour and a half before game time to
get a good seat. They were ham-
mered out of their trees and singing
songs. We were warming up in front
of a packed house. It was like going
to the circus six days in a row."
Freshman Ryan Sittler had his
second straight stint for the United
States in the World Junior Champi.
onships in Gavle. He scored three
goals and two assists in seven games
as the U.S. finished in fourth place.:,
"Playing in the CCHA helped me
a lot," Sittler said. "Also I knew
what to expect this time. The tour-
nament has really helped me mature
as a player. Also, playing for your
country is a great experience."
All four of these tournaments
were watched closely by decision
makers representing U.S. and Cana-
dian amateur hockey. These six
Wolverines are certainly hoping the
scouts liked what they saw.
"Most of us have aspirations to
move on to the next level," Harlock
said. "(The Izvestia) made me real-
ize that I have the opportunity to do
that."

EVAN PETRIE/Daily
'Junior Cam Stewart passes to a teammate in the championship game of the
GLI tournament. Michigan was victorious, and Stewart was named MVP.

The Office of Minority Affairs
is now taking applic ations for
Student Program Hosts for
the KING/CHAVEZ /PARKS
College Day
Spring Visitation Program.
Application deadline is
January 15, 1993
Student Program hosts are responsible for "
supervising and developing work schedules for
teams of student leaders who will work with
students from middle schools visiting the univer-
sity during KCP Spring Visitation. Applications
and job description regarding this position may
U he obtained at The Office of Minority Affairs,
1042 Fleming Building, 1st Floor.
For information contact Felton Rogers at
936-1055
magis-- --mes.U

FLAMES
fenseman Pat Neaton on three
consecutive point-blank shots and
blocking slapshots from forwards
Dan Stiver and David Oliver that
appeared to be heading into the net.
It seems Hillebrandt is making a
habit of getting up for Michigan.
"It is something of a rivalry," he
said. "I can't really explain it. I just
sit there and stop the puck."
The big difference in Friday's
game was the line of Stiver, David
Roberts and Mark Ouimet. The trio
combined for three goals and four
assists, with Stiver and Ouimet
notching three points apiece.
However, the Wolverines could-

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not douse the Flames until the third
period as the two clubs were dead-
locked, 2-2, opening the final stanza.
In the second period, Kevin
Hilton put Michigan ahead, 2-1,
when he fired a spinning puck be-
tween the pipes, but that lead was
short-lived. Less than three minutes
later, at the 19:06 mark, Bessert
scored his seventh goal of the season
to tie the game.
"Their defense had momentum,"
Ouimet said. "We could hear them
in the lockerroom. We were demor-
alized."
Just as the Flames had scored
early in the third on Saturday, the
Wolverines did the same as Ouimet
began the period with his fourth goal
of the season. Off a beautiful move
and feed from Roberts at the right
circle, Ouimet popped the puck past
Hillebrandt to give the Wolverines
the first of their three third-period
tallies and a 3-2 lead.
After Chris Tamer's first goal of
the season, Ouimet scored his sec-
ond of the period when his shot
bounced off the skate of UIC center
Derek Knorr, who had his back to
the play, and into the net.
"It was one of those nights where
anything you shoot seems like it is
going to go in the net," Ouimet said.
"I did not like the second, but I
really liked our third period," Beren-
son said. "We went to the net well.
We got some lucky breaks. The
goals were tough to come by."
Power play goals, particularly,
continue to be tough to come by for
the Wolverines. For the weekend,
Michigan converted only one of 14
chances. The team has been success-
ful on 22 percent of its chances for
the season.
"We had our chances on the
power play," Berenson said. "We
missed Wiseman and Stewart. They
are key players on our units."

Team
Miami
Michigan
Lake Superior
Michigan St.
W. Michigan
Ferris St.
Bowling Green
III.-Chicago
Kent
Notre Dame
Ohio St.

w
11
10
8
8
8
6
6
4
4
4
3

L
2
4
3
5
4
5
10
9
9
11
10

T
3
2
4
1
1
3
0
1
1
1
1

Pts.
25
22
20
17
17
15
12
9
9
9
7

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12th ANNUA L CE LEBRATION!
RESER VA TIONS A VAILABLE NOW
DON'T WAIT 'TIL IT'S TOO LATE!4
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1993 SUMMER CAMPS OF CHAMPIONS
AT THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
MAKE A DIFFERENCE !
CONFERENCES AND SEMINARS
WILL BE HIRING SUMMER CAMP:
-COORDINATORS
-COUNSELORS
-OFFICE STAFF
1. TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE!
2. TO MEET TALENTED YOUNG ATHLETES FROM ALL OVER THE COUNTRY
3. TO LIVE, WORK AND PLAY WITH A GREAT GROUP OF PEOPLE
4. TO HAVE MOST DAYS FREE TO TAKE COURSES OR ENJOY A SUMMER

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