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January 08, 1993 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1993-01-08

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, January 81993- Page 7

California family in
stable condition after
rescued from storm

CEDARVILLE, Calif. (AP) -
As coyotes howled, James Stolpa
trudged on frozen feet, desperately
seeking help in the snow-covered
desert for the wife and child he had
left sheltered by a sleeping bag
hanging from a rock shelf.
After 22 hours of wandering
through waist-high drifts, Stolpa
spotted a highway worker yesterday,
and his eight-day ordeal ended.
Five hours later, using directions
from Stolpa, California Highway
Patrol Officer Pat Green discovered
Jennifer Stolpa, cuddling 5-month-
old Clayton beneath an outcropping
"in the middle of nowhere."
The couple survived on coconut
cookies, Doritos and prenatal vita-
mins. Mrs. Stolpa nursed Clayton
and melted ice in her mouth for
water.
"We were worried about freezing
to death or starving to death," Stolpa
said yesterday at Surprise Valley
Community Hospital, his damaged
feet wrapped and little Clayton cra-
dled in his arms. "We did a lot of
praying."
The ordeal began in Northern
California on Dec. 29 when the
Stolpas borrowed a pickup truck to
attend the funeral of Stolpa's
grandmother in Pocatello, Idaho.
Just as they left, a severe storm
struck, bringing 9 feet of snow to the
area. Authorities believe the Stolpas
got stuck the first night.
After five nights in the snow-
bound truck without seeing another
car, "we had to decide whether to
stay and die or try and do something
and die," said Stolpa, an Army pri-
vate at Camp Roberts, near Paso
Robles.
"I would tell her, 'We're not do-
ing it for me, we're not doing it for
you. We're doing it for the baby,"'
he said.

The couple walked 12 miles
through drifts up to waist-high until
they found shelter under a ledge
Sunday where Mrs. Stolpa and the
baby stayed while Stolpa continued
his trek for help.
While trudging through the high
desert, Stolpa told doctors, he could
hear the coyotes.
Mrs. Stolpa said her husband "is
more than a hero to me."
"I don't think I could have picked
anyone better. He had the courage
and the drive to get us out of there
and he did," she said from her hospi-
tal bed.
Stolpa and his wife were in stable
condition with severe frostbite to
their toes and feet. The baby was
unharmed.
"They never lost their heads and
that's what saved their lives," said
Modoc County Sheriff Bruce Mix.
The Stolpas were transferred later
yesterday to Washoe Medical Center
in Reno, Nev. A plow cleared a path
for their ambulance on Highway 395
as more snow fell.
Stolpa was "somewhat incoherent
when he was found" 30 miles north
of Vya in the wilderness of north-
western Nevada, said Dave Reider, a
spokesperson for Lassen National
Forest.
Dr. Hugh Washburn said high-
way worker Dave Peterson took
Stolpa home, where his wife "heated
(Stolpa's) feet with a blow dryer so
his socks could be pulled off without
tearing off the tissue." Stolpa was
wearing panty hose and heavy socks,
but only light shoes, Washburn said.
The baby was dressed in multiple
layers of clothes, wrapped in a baby
sleeping bag and an adult sleeping
bag.
Stolpa said he and his wife
placed Clayton in a garment bag that
acted as a sled, and the motion
"soothed him" on their hike.

Shetland
Islanders
cope with
oil sp11
S UMBURGH, Shetland
Islands (AP) - Harsh weather
halted efforts yesterday to battle
an oil spill fouling rich marine
habitats and spreading noxious
fumes and oil on land.
An oil mist blowing inland
forced some parents to keep chil-
dren home from school and led
farmers to move their oil-smeared
sheep. Residents worried about
crops and the famous Shetland
ponies, native to the North Sea
islands.
"It's always been a very
healthy place until now," said
Helen Thomson, who runs a pony
trekking business. "I think what
surprised us all is the effect the oil
spill has had on agriculture and
livestock."
The Liberian-registered Braer,
carrying 24.6 million gallons of
Norwegian oil to Canada, ran
aground Tuesday after its engines
failed in hurricane-force winds
Government officials say pri-
vately that about half the cargo has
spilled into the sea.
Gale-force winds and lashing
rains all but shut down yesterday's
efforts to rescue wildlife and clean
up the spreading slick. The

Oil oozes out of the Liberian-registered oil tanker Braer as it lies half-submerged off the southern tip of the
Shetland Islands. The tanker survived intact through one night of ferocious pounding.

weather also prevented planes
from dropping detergents to dis-
perse it.
"A day lost to weather would
be the best way to describe it,"
said George Sutherland, director
of marine operations in the
Shetlands.
The ship's owners, Bergvall
and Hudner of New York, said in
a statement they hoped workers
could begin pumping oil from the
tanker's holds this weekend. They
have pledged compensation.
A salvage team reported

Wednesday the tanker is in one
piece and partly submerged. If the
ship breaks under the pounding
waves, the remaining oil will spill.
Sutherland said oil had spread
four miles up the east coast of
Mainland, the largest island in the
Shetland chain about 100 miles off
the Scottish coast. Oil also was
moving near West Burra island, an
important salmon farming area 13
miles north of the wreck.
Hundreds of dead, oil-covered
fish and birds were found along
the Mainland coast yesterday. The

Shetlands are famed for thriving
seabird colonies, and waters teem-
ing with fish and sea mammals.
Wind has sprayed oil as far as
four miles inland, smearing a
brown coating on farms and sheep.
At the south point of the island, oil
droplets spatter clothing and cling
to the skin.
Martin Hall, director of envi-
ronmental services for the
Shetland Islands Council, said
several farms were damaged.

New tagging system helps fat-
COnscious CUStomers find

Support Campus Cinema

1

CLASSIFIED ADS

H now hiring- Earn $2,000+/
mo, and world -travel Holiday, Summer and
Career employment available. No experience
nesary For employment program call -
206-634-0468 ext. 05598.
HAVE A SPECIAL SKILL?
Work well with children?
Consider summer camp!
Supervisors, counselors, R.N. s,
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Call or write for application:
Joel Stravsky
Jewish Community Center of Cleveland
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26001 South Woodland Road
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(216) 831-0700,
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996-4055.
STUDENT CUSTODIANS
Neeue.d at Student Publications (Michigan
Daily. Michiganensian and. the Gargoyle).
We are looking for individuals who are
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to 12:15 pm at least two days a week. To
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SUBJECTS NEEDED Male, right-handed.
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mal hearing for reaction time experiment in
cognition. Must be available for 90 minutes,
3 consecutive days, same time each day.
Hourly pay + bonus. Call 936-2056.
SUBWAY- close to North Campus. Days/
nights, flexible hrs., free meals. 1701
Plymouth Rd. (next to videowatch).
US TRACERS IS CURRENTLY seeking
motivated students in the Ann Arbor area for
FT and PT independent work. Call 1-800-
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WENDY'S IS NOW HIRING. Get the best
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Free Meals and uniforms
* Performance & Wage reviews
Friendly working environment
Stop by and fill out an application and see
how you can begin a rewarding and respon-
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WINGS OF WESTWOOD- Now hiring
drivers and cooks. Call 662-4659.
WORK FOR ACADEMIC CREDIT OR
VOLUNTEER at U of M's Pound House

LOW FARES - Europe fr. $448, Orient fr.
$947. Call Claudia or Dan @ Regency
Travel, 209 S. State, 665-6122.
ROMANTIC X-SKI GET'VAY! Cozy log
cabins with outdoor hot tub. $49-$69 nightly.
Traverse City area. Close to downhill. Gift
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SKI SIRING BREAK in Park City, Utah.
Call Amy 996-2648 or Tami 665-1026.
SPRING BREAK/REPS. WANTED
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SPRING BREAK IN CANCUN AND
JAMAICA. For best prices call Jeff immne'd.
747-9332.
SPRING BREAK IN CANCUN. All price
ranges available. Best trip at UM year after
year. Call Mike 995-5704 Amy 996-2648.
SPRING BREAK, DAYTONA BEACH!
O.F. Motels, Quad (Icc. 7 full nights, R/T
charter bus, $159.50 pp. Room only $69.50
VIP. Card special (leals, focal & erit. Daytona
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SPRING BREAK7 nights.
D)aytona Beach $129.
Call CMI at 1-800-423-5264.
SPRINGBREAKERS
Promote our Florida Spring Break
packages. Earn MONEY and Free trips.
Campus Marketing. 800-423-5264.
STUDENTS ANYWHERE IN THE U.S.
on Continental fr. $129/$199. Bring your
Continental voucher and your AMEX Card.
Anywhere. in the U.S.A. ontJS Air fr. $ 129/
$189. Bring your US Air Voucher and Chase
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Regency Travel 209 S State 665-6122.
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Breaks-Stamos Family Travel. 663-4400.
WARM BODIES NEEDED: Jamaica &I
Cancun-SPRING BREAK '93- Lowest pricej
guaranteed. Spaces limited. Call Mike 995-
9506.
HERB DAVID GUITAR STUDIO Not just
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NEED 2 TICKETS for Indiana b-ball game.
Call 995.0470.
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(can extend to 3/23). Best offer, 349-1696.
NEED 2 OR 4 TICKETS for Indiana b-ball
game. Call 665-5911.
ANOUNCEMENTS
THE STUDENT BOOK EXCHANGE Jan.
8-10.
Don't buy fron bookstores-buy fron us! 11
AM-6PM in the Union Pendletont Room.
NEED 3-5 TICKETS FOR B-BALL VS.
ILLINOIS. Call Eric 665-2411.
DOWNTOWN COMM. LOFT/GALLERY
SPACE. Daily rates, 209 N. Main St. 769-
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an x.rror rtrr nrt l 1 T

healthy foods at
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP)
- A local supermarket chain is
joining the fight against flab with a
labeling system to steer customers
toward the healthier foods on its
shelves.
Tom's Food Markets, which has
four stores in the Traverse City area,
will affix tags to thousands of pro-
cessed food products beginning
Monday, a spokesperson said.
The "High Fit, Low Fat" color-
coded tagging is based on studies by
the University Medical Center's
MedSport Preventive Cardiology
Program. Foods were evaluated for
dietary fiber, fat, saturated fat,
cholesterol and sodium as disclosed
on product labels.
Foods the MedSport program
considers acceptable will have a
green tag. Those evaluated as ac-
ceptable in limited use will have a
yellow tag.
Under the MedSport program,
foods that don't make either of these
categories are considered unaccept-
able and get a red tag. Tom's, how-

supermarket
ever, will use only green and yellow
tags. Foods that don't fall into either
category will not be tagged.
The idea is to encourage people
to consider the recommended items,
not to discourage them from buying
others, Marty Phelan, director of
merchandising for Tom's, said
yesterday.
An Ann Arbor supermarket
chain, Busch's Valu Land, has a
similar program using the MedSport
tagging system.
"We've had a tremendous re-
sponse," said Dan Courser, a Busch
vice president. "When we first
started a year ago, it was phenome-
nal. All the holes on the shelves
were the MedSport-recommended
items. It took us weeks to get our in-
ventory adjusted."
Phelan, the Tom's official, said.
most processed foods will be tagged.
The program later will be extended
to the bakery, which will feature
muffins made from ingredients ap-
proved by MedSport.

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The University of Michigan
School of Music
Sun. Jan. 10 Stearns Collection:
Virginia Martin Howard Lecture
"Drums of Korea" by Robert C. Provine,
University of Durham, England
School of Music Recital Hall, 2 p.m.
Sun. Jan. 17 Michigan Chamber Players
Mozart: Quintet for Piano and Winds, with
John Mohler, clarinet;,Harry Sargous, oboe;
Richard Beene, bassoon; Lowell Greer, horn;
and Louis Nagel, piano
Rochberg: Trio for Clarinet, Horn and
Piano, with Fred Ormand, clarinet; Lowell
Greer, horn; and Ellen Weckler, piano
Brahms: Quintet for Piano and Strings, with
Stephen Shipps and Andrew Jennings,
violin; Yizhak Schotten, viola; Jerome
Jelinek, cello; and Dickran Atamian, piano
School of Music Recital Hall, 8 p.m.

l

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" WE WANT TO REPAIR YOUR COMPUTER -- NOT SELL YOU A NEW ONE
student/Staff Discount with a copy of this ad

All events free unless specified. Wheelchair accessible. For up-to-date
program information on School of Music events call the 24-Hour
Music Hotline--763-4726

" a)FREE PARKING
M!11 1, 221 FETCH ANN ARBOR

I

Ia

~~ DWelcomes..
Ttsckets avaiable now at the The Miigan
Union Ticket Office. Herb David GuitarStudio
and al TkkelmaslerOuets, and after January 1,
atSchocdkds Records.Charge by phone
at?7-TKTS.

:r

MinLoriy
Career Conference
Explore career opportunities with over 80 major employers and graduate school

T 8 NN S XTEE N TH
ANN URBO

NanciGrlfi

Tuesday, January 26
6:00 pm- O pm
Registration begins
at-430 pm
Informal discussions with
employeis and graduate
school representatives
Arrange interviews with

Pre-Conference Workshops
Information and tips on making the most
of your conference experience
Tuesday January 19 3:40-5:30 pm
Angell Hall, Room 25
Saturday January 23 9:10-11:00 am
Career Planning & Placement

Saturdag, Januar 390 1993 a6:Upm
Hill fuditorium, Rn rbor
R Fund Raiser for XFARK
Program subject to change.
NANCI GRIFFITH
RITCHIE HAVENS
THE MARCIA BALL BAND
PETE MORTON

Sneak Prev i >'"

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