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February 10, 1993 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1993-02-10

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Page 2--The Michigan Daily- Wednesday, February 10,1993

UP upset over treatment of northern rep.

Associated Press
On-again, off-again rumblings
that the Upper Peninsula should bid
farewell to the rest of Michigan are
on again.
It's mostly tongue in cheek, says
state Rep. David Anthony (D-Escan-
aba). He stirred the pot last week in
an interview with The Mining Jour-
nal of Marquette by saying he was
willing to discuss secession after
House Democratic Leader Curtis
Hertel removed Rep. Dominic Jaco-
betti (D-Negaunee) from the position
of Appropriations Committee chair
last month. Critics said Jacobetti
failed to oversee the scandal-torn

House Fiscal Agency, the target of
an investigation of unauthorized
employee payments, nepotism and
other alleged wrongdoing.
But Anthony said yesterday such
talk was "just an expression of frus-
tration" and that he isn't pushing to
cut ties with the Lower Peninsula.
"It's not necessarily that we all
want to secede, but we think about it
when our frustration level rises to
where it is right now," Anthony said
in a telephone interview.
Jacobetti supporters say his crit-
ics are rushing to judgment. It's an-
other example of urban lawmakers
and bureaucrats from the Lower

Peninsula showing disrespect for the
Upper Peninsula, they say.
Anthony said the region's anger
was rising even before the Fiscal
Agency brouhaha. State budget cuts
have hit the Upper Peninsula particu-
larly hard, as would the privatization
of state enterprises sought by the
Engler administration, he said.
"The Mackinac Bridge should be
an instrument that brings the state
closer together," he said. "Instead,
it's a mechanism for Lansing to
bring everything south that isn't
nailed down."
The Houghton Daily Mining
Gazette asked a number of Upper
Peninsula officials about secession
last week, drawing mostly humorous
responses.
"If the governor continues to dis-

credit the U.P. and not give equal or
comparable funding to us, I guess
we'll have to get a new governor,"
said Annette Schaefer, coordinator
for the Tri-County Community Cor-
rections Programs.
"I know it's been discussed be-
fore, but we're too busy here to be
thinking about that. I know it could-
n't be any worse if we did become
our own state," said Roland
Sweeney, chair of the Baraga
County Board of Commissioners.
Bill Fink, superintendent of the
newly established Keweenaw Na-
tional Historical Park, said the Upper
Peninsula has more in common with
Alaska than anywhere else.
"My proposal is that we petition
Alaska for admission as a part of
that state," he said.

GM
Continued from page 1
elected," said Paul Batchelor, who
has worked at the plant for 16 years.
Ypsilanti Township sued GM af-
ter the auto giant announced' in
February 1992 that Willow Run was
among 21 plants it would close as
part of a massive restructuring to cut
costs and eliminate 74,000 jobs by
1995.
GM lost more than $12 billion
making and selling cars in North
America in 1990-91 due to the re-
cession and plant inefficiencies that
put it at a $795-per-car disadvantage
against Ford Motor Co. Unlike Ford,
GM delayed its downsizing, despite
losing about 10 points of market
share to Japanese competitors from
1985 to 1992.
The automaker planned to shut
down Willow Run by summer's end
and move the production to the plant
in Arlington, Texas, which makes
many of the same rear-wheel drive
large cars. Production of some sta-
tion wagon models was scheduled to

move this month, pending the out-
come of the trial.
Ypsilanti Township argued it had
granted GM tax abatements in 1984
and 1988 worth $13.5 million in ex-
change for keeping the continuous
employment at Willow Run. The
abatements run until 2003.
"The issue ... is whether those
representations indeed constitute a
promise and whether it is the type of
promise that should be enforced by
this court to prevent an injustice,"
Shelton said.
GM denied that it signed any
contracts with the abatement
applications or made any verbal
promises.
Lee Schutzman, an attorney for
GM, did promise an appeal to the
state Court of Appeals.
"This shouldn't have any imme-
diate impact on GM's plans at Wil-
low Run, because we planned to
continue building at Willow Run
through the end of the '93 model
year (in July), and I hope the Court
of Appeals rules before that," he
said.

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IDAILY CLASS WEDS
CALL FOR ART:
Jewish Women's Art Exhibit
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ENTRY FORMS DUE BY MARCH 14
Call Debbie 995-9439 or Mara 741-0139

DUDERSTADT
Continued from page 1
"While it has been a painful two
years, Michigan has been unique for
downsizing, cutting its budget, freez-
ing taxes and keeping funding for
key education," he said.
He also stressed the importance
of research and education for
Michigan's economy.

"Michigan is in a multi-decade
transition, leaving behind an indus-
trial economy," he said. "In the fu-
ture, Michigan must compete in a
knowledge-based economy and a so-
ciety increasingly dependent on edu-
cated people.
"Times are probably going to be
much worse before they get better,"
he said.

, 'el
y
Aolq
toot Qt eh

Look Your
Best on the
Beach.

I

r 1

5

Units

BILL
Continued from page 1
right to be involved in the prelimi-
nary selection process in private.
"What we are seeing is the grad-
ual assumption of greater power
over appointments by the
administration, because the elected
governing boards are enjoined by the
Open Meetings Act from discussing
candidates for president," Baker
said.
Sen. Lana Pollack (D-Ann Arbor)
opposes an outright exemption in the4

Michigan Open Meetings Act for
universities, but said she would sup-
port a modification to allow college
governing boards to hold closed
hearings until five finalists were
chosen.
The regents are currently in-
volved in a lawsuit with Booth
Newspapers over an alleged 1988
violation of the Open Meetings Act
during the selection of University
President James Duderstadt. The ac-
tion is awaiting hearing by the
Michigan Supreme Court.

0

Cypress:
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747-9400
1220 S. University'
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he Office of the ie PresidentforStudentAffairs
presents the
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O U T S T A O r EN Z A T O N
- TA:I t O R: M- E
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OUTSTANING NTWMEME
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Development Center, 2202 Miciigan Union 763-5900

AIDS
Continued from page 1
provide to local agencies.
The task force plans to work with
the Ann Arbor Board of Education
because many experts feel that AIDS
education is most effective during
early adolescence. Education can
change behavior patterns in young
people before they begin sexual ac-
tivity, said Robert Fekety, head of
the Infectious Disease Clinic at
University Hospital.
Currently, there is no comprehen-
sive AIDS education program in the
Ann Arbor public schools.
"AIDS education should be put in
the 7th, 8th and 9th grades where
youth can be taught how to practice
safe sex or to abstain," Fekety said.
The group also plans to try to
combat the attitude that AIDS only
affects people in certain "risk
groups" - gays, IV-drug users and
hemophiliacs.
Mary Bejian, a member of the
AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power
(ACT-UP), said this myth can be
problematic.
"This is particularly dangerous
because it leads people who aren't in
these groups to think that they're not

at risk," she said. "It's the risk behav-
iors that count. There are a lot of
heterosexuals, for example, who
have anal sex and gay persons who
don't.
"It's not who you are, it's what
you do,"Bejian said.
She added that people perceived
to be members of "risk groups" often
face discrimination.
Discrimination against homosex-
uals and individuals infected with0
HIV perpetuates their risk of
infection and illness, Ostrow said.
"Fighting AIDS becomes a men-
tal health issue," Ostrow said.
Ostrow said ways to reduce risk
include providing better services and
emotional support for people
infected with HIV.
Ann Arbor is served by support
groups through the Catherine
McAuley Heath System, Wellness
Networks, Huron Valley Chapter,
the Ann Arbor Veteran's
Administration Hospital and other
organizations.
However, Ostrow said, "There
aren't enough support groups in Ann
Arbor. I think attitudes are changing
but it is a constant process - we re-
ally need to be educating people on
an on-going process."

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