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January 07, 1993 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1993-01-07

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Page 2--The Michigan Daily- Thursday, January 7, 1993

CLINTON
Continued from page 1
Clinton did not back away from
his call for higher fuel efficiency
standards, which the auto industry
opposes. Poling said Clinton told the
group he is still in favor of tougher
standards but "he didn't want to do
anything that was detrimental to the
auto industry."
The carmakers requested the
meeting; Clinton invited Bieber.
Aside from Poling, the industry
was represented by John Smith,
president and chief executive officer
of General Motors Corp. and
Chrysler Corp. Chair and CEO
Roger Eaton. Vice President-elect Al
Gore also attended.
"Every single person in this
meeting commented that this repre-
sents a fresh start on how business,
government and labor can work to-
gether in a new spirit of trust and
cooperation," Clinton said in a writ-
ten statement.
"Every person commented on the
waste that takes place when gov-
ernment and industry come from a
perspective of distrust," he said.

A transition source said the au-
tomakers and Bieber did not push
Clinton too hard, apparently hoping
to get off on the right foot with the
new administration. "They didn't try
to reach any conclusions," the
source said. "They didn't push him
to take any action."
At a news conference outside
Clinton's residence, Poling said the
group did not ask for specific com-
mitinents to help the auto industry
but discussed issues such as soaring
health care costs and the impact of
federal regulations.
The automakers "hope we could
work cooperatively in the planning
stage on the regulatory process," he
said.
Bieber said Clinton understood
the UAW's concerns but didn't
agree on every point.
"Clinton should understand that
stricter importer quotas and higher
tariffs will result in increased auto-
mobile prices and reduced choice for
middle-class American families, as
well as, a loss of American jobs,"
said Walter Huizenga, president of
the American International Automo-
bile Dealers Association.

STUDENTS
Continued from page 1
"I guess (the students) were
shopping around more and decided
not to come. This year we had one of
the highest number of students who
forfeited their deposits," said Gene
Pijanowski, associate dean of the
School of Art.
Over the last 10 years, the num-
ber of high school graduates has also
been on the decline, leading to in-
creased competition -unong colleges
and universities for a smaller pool of
students.
"The group of students we are in-
terested in are the same students
other top schools are interested in,"
Swain said. "We can't just sit back
complacently and expect students to
attend the University of Michigan.
We have to actively promote the
advantages of the Universit y."
In response to the decrease ini the
number of high school graduates, the
University is purchasing more names
from the search programs offered by
the SAT and ACT.
"For the fall of 1993, we pur-
chased the names of 130,000
prospective students compared to
90,000 in 1992," Swain said.
The University has also partici-
pated in many college fairs nation-
wide in an effort to counteract the
decline in the numbers of eligible
students.
"Hopefully, this is the last year of
the birthrate demographic decline,"
Spencer said. "However, the
increase is going to be slight at
best."

Brown says lobbying record will

be a plus as commere

WASHINGTON (AP) - Ronald
Brown told Congress yesterday that
as commerce secretary he would
give American business the benefit
of advocacy skills honed as a
lawyer-lobbyist for such clients as
the government of Haiti and
Japanese electronics firms.
"I'd rather use powers of persua-
sion than sharp elbows but I can use
sharp elbows when necessary. I'm
an old basketball player," he told a
three-hour confirmation hearing of
the Senate Commerce, Science and
Transportation Committee.
Brown said his experience repre-
senting Japanese firms will help him
be a "much stronger and effective
advocate" of fair trade for the United
States, much as a stint in a district at-
torney's office might help a defense
lawyer sharpen his skills.
"We have to enforce our trade
laws. I intend to be vehement in my
enforcement of those laws," he said.
"We've got to stop getting rolled."
Brown, chair of the Democratic
National Committee, is the first of
President-elect Clinton's Cabinet
nominees to undergo Senate review.
He would be the first Black
commerce secretary.
Democrats are hoping to confirm
the entire Cabinet soon after the new
president is inaugurated on Jan. 20.
Republicans have said they will
make sure the process doesn't go too
fast, but no serious objections have
been raised against any of the
nominees.

"It seems to be going well,"
Clinton said in Little Rock, Ark.
"We've worked hard to make sure
our Cabinet members are ready for
this process."
He said he watched Brown's
opening statement on television "and
then I went back to work."
Brown received mostly polite
questions about his work as a partner
in one of Washington's premier
legal-lobbying firms - Patton,
Boggs and Blow - and was
strongly defended by a senior
Republican on the panel, Bob
Packwood of Oregon.
"My dad was a lobbyist for 35
years before the Oregon Legislature.
I think it's a fine calling," Packwood
said.
Sen. Alfonse D'Amato (R-N.Y.)
said Brown "will represent the best
interests of the American people
with the same passion and commit-
ment that he has displayed
throughout his career."
Brown said he was proud of his
lobbying career and expressed strong
support for Clinton's rules to block
people from cashing in later on their
government jobs.
"I will never be an unethical
person, whether there are rules or no
rules," said Brown, who represented
foreign interests after serving as an
aide to Sen. Edward Kennedy (D-
Mass.)
"I will adhere to the highest ethi-
cal standards.... I consider myself as
being on a mission for the president-

e secretary
elect and the American people," he
said.
He said his representation of a
coalition of U.S. subsidiaries of
Japanese firms, led by Sony Corp. of
America, had been narrowly limited
to copyright issues and that he would
recuse himself if a conflict arose.
As a representative of the
Republic of Haiti during the dicta-
torship of Jean-Claude Duvalier,
Brown said he worked to reform that
government's human rights and
labor practices.
"Lawyers represent a whole va-
riety of clients, some of them unsa-
vory.... I felt that I could make a
difference here and I honestly think
that I did. I think there was an im-
provement in the human rights situa-
tion.... I wish there had been more
progress," he said.
He disavowed any involvement
with his law firm's representation of
the Arab-owned Bank of Credit and
Commerce International, the scan-
dal-ridden bank that collapsed in
1991.
"I was not involved in that matter
at all. I did not even know the firm
was representing BCCI until I read it
in the newspaper ... and Patton,
Boggs as a firm was only
peripherally involved in the matter,"
he said.
Sen. Trent Lott (R-Miss.) took
the lead in questioning Brown about
his past business ties and afterward
said he looked forward to working
with Brown as secretary.

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TOBACCO
Continued from page 1
The tobacco research program
was doing much work on the effects
of secondhand smoke in children.
"All of that work has been killed,"
said an EPA scientist who spoke on
condition of anomymity.
Preuss said the research was

dropped because the agency had
completed its central aims and
wanted to move to other pollutants.
"It's outrageous that the EPA has
terminated funding of the most im-
portant indoor air pollutant," said
Stanton lantz of the University of
California, San Francisco. "The FPA
had one of the best research pro-
gramns in the world.'

SPILL
Continued from page 1
investigators wrote, "The current ...
staff had never experienced such a
widespread radioactive contunina-
tion event. Never in his 15-year ca-
reer has the radiation safety officer
found it necessary to conduct con-
tamination surveys in private
residences."
Sue Gagner, a public affairs offi-
cial from the NRC office in
Washington, D.C., said there are al-
ternatives to paying the fine.
"They could write a letter to

protest all or part of it. Then we de-
cide whether to impose or mitigate it
in part," she said.
However, if the University re-
fuses to pay, the NRC has the power
to forcibly obtain the money.
. "The Department of Justice
would go in and seek to recover the
fine in court." Ingram said.
Although other universities have
objected to fines in the past, Gagner
said none have ever refused to pay.
If the University agrees to pay,
the money will come from the lab
responsible for the spill.

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GUARDS
Continued from page 1
But some prison reform advo-
cates say it should be more than a
misdemeanor offense, punishable by
up to two years in prison and a $500
fine.
"The DOC (Department of
Corrections) erroneously views these
incidents as romantic attachments,
instead of as the assaultive behavior
they really are," said attorney
Deborah LaBelle, who has filed fed-
eral lawsuits in three prison rape
cases.
LaBelle said she is filing a class-
action lawsuit this month demanding
that the Department of Corrections
protect inmates from sexual assaults.
Williams said many of the allega-
tions prove false.
"We do stand behind our offi-

cers," he said. "Most of them per-
form their jobs in a splendid manner,
but there frankly have been some
bad apples.
"Those we determine are bad
have been plucked out of the barrel."
Joan Yukins, warden at Scott
Correctional, said she has requested
more training for corrections officers
who were at the .all-male prison
when it began a yearlong
changeover ending last May.
"We inherited a mostly male staff
who were not used to dealing with
women," Yukins said. But she said
there are few problem employees.
We also have our share of liars
and manipulators in the prison popu-
lation," she said.
Of the 35,000 inmates in
Michigan's correctional facilities,
about 2,000 are women, according to
corrections officials.

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The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Morday through Friday during the fall and winter terms by
students at the University of Michigan. Subscriptions for winter term, starting in January, via U.S. mail are $120.
The balance of fall term only is $40. Winter term (January through April) is $90. On-campus subscriptions for
winter term are $35. Subscriptions must be prepaid.
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ADDRESS: The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1327.
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EMORIAL STAI

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NEWS Henry Goldblatt, Managing Editor
EDITORS: Andrew Levy, Melissa Peerless, David Rhasin gold, Bethany Robertson
STAFF: Adam Anger, Jonathan Berndt. Hope Caati Kerry Colligan, Kenneth Dancyger. Lauren Dermer.,Jen DiMasclo. Tim Gruimel,
Nate Huley. Satloi Janveja, Megan Lardner. Robin Litwin, Wilt McCahitt. Shettey Morrison, Marc Olender, David Powers. Mona
Oureshi. Karen Sabgir. Abby Schweitzer. Gwen Shatter. Purvi Shah. David Shepardson. Jenrnifer Silverberg, Johnny Su, Karen
Talaski, Andrew Taylor, Jennifer Tianen. Chastity Wison, Christne Young
GRAPH-ICS STAFF: David Acton. Jonathan Berndt. Johnny Su
OPINION Yael Citro, Geoffrey Earle, Amitava Mazumdar, Editors
STAFF: Jonathan Chat (Associate Editor). Mike Chau. Rich Choi, Erin Enhorn (Editorial Assistant). Sam Goodsein, Judith Kalra,
David Leitner Jason Lichtein Katherine Metres Dave Rowe. Lindsay So el= Jordan Stan=l, Brian Vi=strom, Flint Wane..
SPORTS John Niyo, Managing Editor
EDITORS: Josh Du~bow Jani Durst, Ryan Herrington, Albert Lin
STAFF: Bob Abremon, Rachel Bachman. Paul Barger, Tom Bausano, Jesse Brouhard, Ken Davidoff, Andy DeKore, Brett Forrest,
Jim Foss, Mike Hilt. Eri Himstedt Thom Holden, Brett Johnson, Seth King, Wendy Law. Adam Miller. Rich Mitvatsky. Antone Pits
Mike Rancilio, Tim Rardin. Michael Rosenberg, Jaeson Rosenfeld. Chad Safran, Tim Spolar, Andy Stabile, Ken Sugiura.
ARTS Jessie Halladay, Aaron Hamburger, Editors
EDITORS: Megan Abbott (Film), Carina A Bacon (Theater), Nima Hodaei (Weekend etc.), Darcy Lockman (Books), Scott Storing
(Music), Michar el Jah'n Wilson (Fine Arts).
STAFF: Laura Alantas, Jon Altshui Greg Baise, Jill Banks, Melissa Rose Bernardo, Mark Binelli, Jason Carrotl. Carnito Fontecila,
Patrick Kim. Kristen Knudsen, Alison Levy. John R. Rybock, Dave Skelly. Michael Thompson, Jayne Wawryzniak. Michelle Weger,
Sarah Weidman. Kirk Wetters. Josh Worth, Kim Yaged.
PHOTO Kristoffer Gillette, Editor
STAFF Erik Angermeier, Michelle Guy. Douglas Kanter, John Kavaliauskas, Heather Lowman, Sharon Musher, Evan Petrie, Molly
Stevens A
DISPLAY SALES Amy Font, Manager

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