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December 04, 1992 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1992-12-04

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, December 4, 1992- Page 7

CLASSIFIED ADS

Women label harassment as demeaning

STUDENTS APPLY NOW!
ADVERTISING PLACEMENT
COORDINATOR
at The Michigan Daily. Obtain valuable
experience. Must work independently &
efficiently under deadlines. Inflexible hours
from 3 p.m. - 5 p.m. M-F next semester.
Apply at 420 Maynard, second floor before 5
p.m. Dec. 11. Ask for Nancy.
SUMMER JOBS ACT NOW! Works Cor-
poration is in search of a select few, for
management positions state wide. Receive
the best business experienceavail., not to
mention the best money made anywhere.
Interested? Act Now! Call 668-8155.
TEMP. HELP WANTED part and full-time
clerks, cashiers, etc. Please apply at the
Michigan Union Bookstore, 530p.State St.,
ground floor of the Mich. Union.
VOLUNTEER SUBJECTS NEEDED FOR
ZINC DIET STUDY. Volunteers must be
healthy men, age 22-40, who are able to eat
all meals at our research unit at the Univer-
sity of Michigan Hospital for 8-10 mos.
Reimbursement, $300/mo. Call: 747-3166 9
A.M.-2 P.M., Mon., Tues., Wed., Fri.
WINGS OF WESTWOOD Looking for
drivers & cooks to work in emps. bar. 662-
4659.
WORK FOR ACADEMIC CREDIT OR
VOLUNTEER at U of M's Pound House
Children's Center during Winter Term. Join
hundreds of past students in quality ex-
perience in working with young children. Lo-
cated at Hill and East University. Please call
764-2547 for more information or to arrange
a visit.

At~ PRkjtian PIaul
Classified Advertising
Department
is currently hiring
business-minded
freshpersons
sophomores
to work as Assistant
Account Executives.
Applications
available at the
'Student Publications Bldg.
420 Maynard
Deadline: Fri., Dec.4
GOING PLACES
*SELL ME YOUR STUDENT AIRLINE
VOUCHER! (female) For use in Dec. Sarah
663-8310.
EURAILPASSES, JAPAN RAIL, INT'L
STUDENT IDs, HIOSTEL CARDS. We sell
,these cheap travel items, AND we'll tell you
if there's an even cheaper way to go.
EURAILPASSES COST MORE AFTER
JAN. 1--buy now for next summer & save
(makes a nice Christmnas present too). Visit
the UM INTERNATIONAL CENTER for the
best advice in the country on your options for
study, work, and cheap travel abroad! We're
next to the Union & W. Quad, 8-12/1 -5 M-F,
or call 747-2299.
LOW FARES - Europe fr. $448, Orient fr.
$947. Call Claudia or Dan @ Regency
Travel, 209 S. State, 665-6122.
PRICES FOR STAY-NOT PER NIGHT'
SOUTH PADRE ISLAND ~ S109
5 and 7 NIGHTS
DA YTONA BEACH $ 68
5 AND 7 NIGHTS
PANAMA CITY BEACH $s81
5 AND 7 NIGHTS
STEAMBOAT "" 129
2. 5 AND 7 NIGHTS cc
12th Annual
Party!
TOLL FREE INFORMATION SRSERYATIONS
ROMANTIC X-SKI GETAWAY! Cozy log
cabins with outdoor hot tub. $49-$69 nightly.
Traverse City area. Close to downhill. Gift
:certificates available. Ellis Lake Resort. 616-
276-9502.
ROSEBOWL PACKAGES! GO BLUE w/
Student Breaks/Stamos Travel. Call 663-
4400, Ypsi. 483-5040, out of town 1-800-
554-7444.
ROSEBOWL! Complete packages from
$899. Land only from $479. Regency Travel,
209 S. State. Call 665-6122.
ROUNDTRIP AIRFARE TO
ROSEBOWL Depart Metro 12/29, return 1/
5. $300 or best offer. Call 996-9244.
SPOINS BREAK'93
Non-Stop air a (7) Nights Hotel - Taxes " Club
Discounts " Transfers * Actvltles Program
CANCUN from $399
BAHAMAS from $409
JAMAICA from $439
SOUTH PADRE from $469

00GOINGPA.CES.:,:.
STUDENT TRAVEL BREAKS AT
STAMOS TRAVEL.
Open weekends and evenings.
Ann Arbor 663-4400, Ypsi. 483-5040.
STUDENTS ANYWHERE IN THE U.S.
on Continental fr. $129/$199. Bring your
Continental voucher and your AMEX Card.
Anywhere in the U.S.A. on US Air fr. $129/
$189. Bring your US Air Voucher and Chase
Visa/Mastercard. Call Kristina or Ann at
Regency Travel 209 S. State 665-6122:
(look own!
Cancun Mexico from 419
Panama City Florida from $99
Daytona Beach Florida roni $119
Key West Florida from $229
On-ampus contact:
Stacey @ 741-8141 or Melanie @ 663-3292
Conlin-Faber Travel 677-0900
540 E. Liberty St. 0 3270 Washtenaw
2663 Plymouth * Traber Village Mall
Huron Valley Travel
1918 W. Stadium Blvd. 761-1300
Student Travel Breaks/Stamos Travel
407 N. Fifth Ave. 663-4400
I STUDENT
siwcE 1-800-64&4849
SW AIRLINE TICKETS $350 RT/$200
Oneway. No notice reqd. 313-581-0290 24
hrs.
FOOD GATHERERS THANKS ALL OF
YOU who donated to our food drive! If
you'd like more info, about us or want to
help, please call 761-2769.
MUSIC.....
AUDIOPHILE QUALITY loudspeakers.
Factory direct prices, 5 yr. warranty. Save
$100 to $200 per pair. Dennis 397-0263.
HERB DAVID GUITAR STUDIO Not just
guitars. 302 E. Liberty. 665-8001. Free les-
son special: harp, percussion.
PHANTOM OF THE OPERA TICKETS
FOR SALE in Chicago for Dec. 19. Call
764-1758.
ONE WAY TICKET TO NYC for anytime
in Dec. $130 or best offer. 764-1103.
MICHIGAN FOOTBALL TICKETS FOR
SALE. All games. 668-7707.
FULL SEASON B-BALL TICKET for sale.
Make me an offer!! Call Brian, 663-7413.
ONE WAY TICKET TO LA. Dec. 18, $110
or Best offer. Mark 769-4807.
BASKETBALL TICKETS FOR SALE in
student section. $10- 16 each. (313) 871-
5818.
FULL SEASON STUDENT B-BALL
tickets. Best offer. Call 764-9629.
WE'RE SEARCHING FOR A "FEW
GREAT MEN" The Mr. USA Michigan
competition is interviewing men 18-35 to be
contenders in the eighth annual Mr. USA
Michigan Mens Pageant. This is not a body
building competition. 335-5757.
IBEARCH WfORMAIINN
Largest Library of information in U. S. -
all subjects
Order Catalog Today with Visa/MC or COD
HOTLIE 800 -(1 3)1470 222
Or, rush $2.00 to: Research Information
11322 Idaho Ave. #206-A, Los Angeles, CA 90025
FEMALE GRAD. STUDENT, mature non-
smoker, share my quiet home. References
required. 971-0122, leave message.

by Pete Matthews
LSA junior Amy Harfield was
walking down an Ann Arbor street
when a driver called her over to his
car.
She thought he was asking for
directions, but when Harfield ap-
proached the car, she realized the
driver was masturbating while talk-
ing to her.
Street harassment - verbal or
visual - is something almost all
women experience at some point in
their lives. While some may argue
that comments are meant as com-
pliments, many women report feel-
ings of anger, fear, but sometimes
indifference, to these encounters.
"It makes me very angry and
very self-conscious," Harfield said.
"Women are viewed as prey - it
makes me feel as if I should walk
around with a sign announcing
'prime rib."'
Verbal harassment doesn't only
happen on the streets, but is a reality
in bars, parties, and campus
buildings.
Harfield said she was told in a
bar "what you need is a boyfriend or
a good fuck," after refusing to date

the teaching assistant she had beat in
a game of darts.
"I don't even notice it any more
at work" said Laura, an LSA soph-
more, who works in a local bar.
"I came from a small town and
grew up without harassment -
coming here was a new experience
and now I'm immune to it," Laura
said. "The best way to deal with it is
to ignore it."
The definition of verbal harass-
ment "depends on the person's per-
sonality" said Susan Stark, a first-
year LSA student.
LSA senior Val Boreland defined
verbal harassment as "anything that
makes me feel uncomfortable and
that is inappropriate. I used to be
embarrassed by it, but now I take it

for what it is, and it's nothing com-
pared to New York."
Other students agreed that Ann
Arbor streets are tame compared to
those in other locales.
"People don't say anything com-
pared to Pittsburg and New York or
Spain," said Lisa Rubin, an School
of Art senior, adding that the way
she handles harassment depends on
her mood.
"One time I blew a kiss after a
guy blewone. If it was five minutes
later I might have said 'fuck you'...
Some people talk shit, play along or
tell the guy to 'fuck off.' You've got
to find ways of dealing with it be-
cause you can't walk around pissed-
off all day."

'Women are viewed as prey - it makes me feel
as if I should walk around with a sign
announcing 'prime ribs"
- Amy Harfield
LSA junior

U-M semmar permits
students to visit home
in 'virtual reality'

One student said she feels she is
often targeted for sexual harassment
by homeless people because of her
appearance and economic status.
"I get derogatory remarks for
being female or for being dressed
well and being wealthy enough to
study," said a School of Natural
Resources and Environment junior,
who preferred not to be named. She
said being harassed by some home-
less people has perpetuated her nega-
tive stereotype of the group.
Many women feel they have ex-
perienced something akin to being
stereotyped. Women said verbal ha-
rassers ignore their personality, in-
tegrity and feelings - only recog-
nizing their bodies as objects of
physical desire.
"It's difficult to walk through a
campus building or city street and
not have your physical aspect valued
more than any other part of you,"
Harfield said.
"It plays into your self esteem
and success as a student. It's hard to
carry on a vigorous academic career
when you are constantly being
commented on and critiqued physi-
cally," Harfield added.

by David M. Powers
Daily Staff Reporter
In "Total Recall," Arnold
Schwarzenegger had to wait until
the year 2084 to travel to Mars -
in his mind.
Yesterday, however, U-M stu-
dents could take a simulated ride
through San Francisco just by
visiting North Campus.
"This is the future," said Rick
Smith, a School of Music junior,
after experiencing the simulated
flight through San Francisco.
"You don't have to take a
vacation, you can just download
Japan. Why watch a movie when
you can be part of it?"
Smith took flight at the Virtual
Reality seminar and
demonstration held by the U-M
Program in Scientific
Visualization at the Chrysler
Center yesterday.
The seminar showcased one of
the recent developments in
computer science - Virtual
Reality (VR) - and its
applications. Visitors were also
allowed to try two different types
of VR machines.
Peter Beier, director of the
visualization program, described
VR as an interactive, realistic,
three-dimensional computer
simulation.
"The user puts a helmet on....
This helmet encloses him from the

environment he is in, and through
very miniature video screens, he is
presented with a stereo image of a
computer-generated world. As he
moves his head that world
changes in concert," he said.
With the use of various con-
trollers the subject is able to
interact with the artificial
environment, said Steven
Aukstakalnis, vice president of
Martix Technical Services - a
Michigan-based consulting
company specializing in VR.
Using gloves equipped with
sensors and hand controls, the
subject not only affects the
images, but can actually feel a
simulated physical response.
"There's been a lot of recent
effort to provide the users with ...
tactile feedback," he said. The
user feels a rough approximation
of what the objects are like in real
life.
"They've also developed suits
that track ... full body motion," he
added. Currently these suits
resemble wet suits.
The applications are extraordi-
nary, he added. Currently, VR is
used to test aerodynamics by
simulating wind tunnels, and by
chemists to simulate molecular
reactions in which the scientist
can interact with the molecules. It
is also being developed as a
surgical aid, Beier said.

Dave Gillie tries out a simulator at a demonstration of Virtual Reality
technology at the Chrysler Auditorium on North Campus yesterday.

However, the use of VR has
raised some ethical concerns.
Some research has focused on
simulating situations such as sex.
Important questions need to be
asked, said Fred Budelman,
director of marketing at Virtual
Reality Inc. in New York. "Whom
does it hurt when it's all computer
simulated?"

Currently, the most
economically profitable field of
development is entertainment,
Budelman said. "VR
Entertainment is going to be a bil-
lion-dollar-a-year industry.'"
At the moment no VR research
is being done at the U-M, Beier
said.

I

FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED Jan.
May 1, Large apartment extremely close
campus. Rent very reasonable 996-8503.

1-
to

FEMALE ROOMMATE to share 1 bdrm.
in 2 bdrm. bi-level apt. on Church. Avail.
Jan., dshwshr., lndry. Call 994-1440.
FOURTH FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED for fall & winter '93. Great apt.,
location, and people. 996-4216. Must act fast.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED for winter
term. Rent is around $200/person. Call Bob
at 994-8970.
ROOMMATE NEEDED in spacious fully
furn 1 bdrm. apt. Great Price/loc. 930-1895.
SNG. OR DBL. ROOM AVAIL, from
winter on. Bi-level apt. Call Judy at 665-
048 7.
WANTED: FEMALE RMTE. JAN-MAY
1- at 2 bdrm/4 person apt. central campus,
]dry., cable, free heatwater. 741-8709.
IBM 286 monochrome screen, quietwriter 7
printer, wordperfect 5.1, LOTUS, more.
$350. Call Heidi 764-3870.
Q o o
o
v
r-Q
Don't forget to say
Happy Holidays
with the
Michigan Daily
koeddaet Pa4el;
T,---...,..tr --.A

Michigan city heads list of
possible locations for new
Pentagon office complex

Associated Press
While one Michigan city prepares
to show off its highlights in hopes of
getting a Pentagon office complex,
another plans to fight the gov-
ernment' s decision to drop it from
the list of possible sites.
Saginaw was one of 20 sites an-
nounced Tuesday by the Department
of Defense as a possible location for
one of five new accounting centers.
Detroit, one of six other Michigan
contenders, didn't make the cut.
Officials in the cash-strapped city
of Detroit had hoped the office com-
plex might aid in revitalizing down-
town.
But Kenneth Dobson, Detroit
Downtown Development Authority
director, and other officials said
Wednesday the requirements for
placement of the building were bi-
ased against big cities like Detroit.
"They asked for small towns in
the southern regions of the country,"
Dobson said. "We started out being
behind the eight ball. They clearly
were intent to not use this as an
economic development program for
urban areas."
The site criteria included quality-
of-life measures geared to small

Coleman Young said Wednesday.
The office complex would hold
up to 7,000 federal employees.
Urban centers making the cut in-
cluded Cleveland, New Orleans and
Indianapolis.
A final decision is expected in
March.
Detroit's $100 million'proposal
involved turning part of the aban-
doned Hudson's building into a
parking garage and renovating the
top floors for offices. Dobson said
the plan met all the Pentagon's
technical requirements, including
free rent and up to $20 million cash
to cover operating costs.
Defense Department spokesper-
son Jean Marie Ward said only that,
"The overriding evaluation criterion
was the cost to the Department of
Defense."
Meanwhile, Saginaw officials are
mapping a final push to persuade
federal officials to transfer the work-
ers to the city.
Three staffers from the Defense
Finance and Accounting Service will
visit Saginaw Wednesday to inspect
10 downtown sites city administra-
tors are offering.
"It's just amazing to beat out all

XX.

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