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September 10, 1992 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1992-09-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 6-The Michigan Daily/New Student Edition-Thursday, September 10, 1992
SAPAC head selection spurs
controversy on U-M campus

"

by Karen Talaski
Daily Gender Issues Reporter
The U-M community is split over the
decision to hire Debra Cain as the new di-
rector of the Sexual Ass it Prevention and
,Awareness Center (SAPAC). Committee
-aenmbers and an ad-hoc group have
protested the decision criticizing Cain's
ensitivity to certain issues.
Cain was hired after an extensive search
o replace former director Julie Steiner,
-who resigned in November. Kata Issari, a
-SAPAC counselor who served as interim
.director and was among the two final can-
':idates for the job, will continue her coun-
eling duties at the center.
Cain started as SAPAC director
September 1. Before coming to the U-M,
'she spent 15 years as the executive director
of Help Against Violent Encounters Now
(HAVEN) - a non-profit sexual assault and
domestic violence agency for Oakland
County.
Search committee member and
;Rackham graduate student Colin Leach
expressed his shock at the decision to hire
,Cain. "I think Debra Cain has done a won-
derful job at HAVEN. I don't think anyone
would question that.
"But the committee agreed by consen-
sus that Kata Isarri was the first recom-
mendation for the job," Leach continued.
-"Debra has crisis intervention experience,
-but she is centainly not a counselor."

'A~a student, I wanted
someone who students
would find approachable...
SAPAC members and staff
expressed discomfort with
how (Cain) related with
them.'
-- Colin Leach
SAPAC Search committee
member

wanted someone who students would find
approachable," Leach said. "SAPAC mem-
bers and staff expressed discomfort with
how (Cain) related with them."
"The committe felt that Kata was the
best candidate to hire," Leach said. "No
one had more experience in counseling that
her."
Cain was also accused in a letter sent
over electronic mail by a group calling it-
self the Committee to Preserve the Intregity
of SAPAC of falling short of the job re-
quirements because she did not receive her
Masters degree in a social service field, but
rather in administration.
Search committee chair Delores Sloan
replied to the message in a written state-
ment supporting the appointment of Cain.
Sloan said she was "proud of the way the
search was handled and the appointment of
Debra Cain."
Interfraternity Council President Bruce
Namerow, who served on the search com-
mittee for the new SAPAC director, said
the decision to hire Cain was the right one.
"Debra Cain wowed us in the interview,
and she is so qualified and so well known,"
Namerow said.
Leach suggested in a meeting held yes-
terday with Sloan and Hartford that "the
best way to serve the people of the univer-
sity was to take advantage of these two
wonderful people (Cain and Issari)," by
making them co-directors.

Leach said he was concerned not only
because of Cain's lack of experience, but
because she will be responsible for
SAPAC's back-up beeper.
"The center is open from 9 to 5 week-
days. But at night and on the weekends, the
director as well as the counselors wear a
beeper in case of an emergency," Leach
said. "Debra Cain lives 45 minutes away in
West Bloomfield and has no immediate
plans to move to this area."
Another concern was that Cain does not
have experince working with students or
people of ethnic diversity. "As a student, I

9
0

MOLLY STEVENS/Daily
Hanging out
Juniors Suzanne Tiscareno and Becca Brown search for a plant for their new apartment
during the Panhel plant sale in the Union yesterday.

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Sororities
hurry to
start fall
rush early
by Joey Barker
Daily Staff Reporter
Many first-year students have
faced screaming, singing and shout-
ing from their peers, even before
their professors have had a chance to
talk to them.
This year, sorority rush - which
began Monday - is being held ear-
lier than normal, allowing many
first-year and transfer students little
time to unpack and orientate them-
selves before beginning hectic Rush
activities.
Despite the scheduling change,
rush organizers said the number of
995 women participating in the
yearly event is slightly higher than
last year's 991.
Panhellenic Advisor Mary Beth
Seiler said the organization has put a
lot of effort into informing the in-
coming female students about the
earlier rush, including mailings dur-
ing the summer, and presentations
during orientation.
"We decided to hold Rush earlier
so that it interfered less with class,"
Seiler said.
The earlier scheduling did not
seem to phase several first-year stu-
dents, who had few problems finding
the time needed to participate in rush
activities.
One Stockwell first-year student,
who moved into her room Sunday,
said she barely had time to unpack
before rush began Monday. She said
she was eager to rush so she could
meet new people - and because her
older sister urged her to give it a try.
Sheri Walker, a Bursley resident
and first year-student, said she de-
cided to rush because she was hav-
ing trouble meeting people from
central campus, and thought this
would be a good way to do so.
Amy Saladin, a native of Grand
Rapids, Michigan, also said that
rushing was a good way to meet
people, noting "It's a lot of fun."
Michigan
Alumni
work here:
The Wall Street Journal
The New York Times
The Washington Post
The Detroit Free Press
The Detroit News
NBC Sports
Associated Press
United Press International
Scientific American Time
Newsweek

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