100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 13, 1992 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1992-11-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Friday, November 13, 1992
_ . _

Free Hepatitis B Vaccine
Students, age 18 and older, who are eligible for university health service,
with no prior history of Hepatitis B infection or vaccination and who are not
pregnant, are eligible. Muis't not be 'in any health science program that
recommends Hepatitis B "vaccination (Nursing, Medical, Dental, Lab
Science, etc.)
MUST BE ABLE TO COMPLETE A SID MONTH STUDY PERIOD.
Contact:
Allergy & Immunization Clinic, University Health Services
" 207 Fletcher, Ann Arbor, Michigan Phone: 313-764-8304
.8:30 am (9:15 am on Thurs)-11:00 am; 12:30pm-4:00 pm
VACATION
TIME
"SPRING. BREAK SPECIAL"
Two R.T. airfares to Fla. plus a One Day Cruise to the Bahamas $150.00
Seven Nights Lodging at any majorcity in Fla. $770.00
Processing Fee $ 25.40
Total Cost $945.44
Cost Per Person based on Double Occ.... $472.50
To receive this EXCITING VACATION ACT NOW and send $150.00 for your
Reservation Request Form.
Make check or money order payable to:
Vacation Time, 2753 Auburn Rd. Rochester Hills, MI 48309
.313-435-5720

Students to lobby
for human rights
at Amnesty forum

by Tanishia Harris
Amnesty International is holding
its annual "Student Activism Day"
conference tomorrow at the
University of Illinois-Circle campus,
which will encourage college stu-
dents to lobby for human rights.
. Amnesty International is a'
worldwide organization that deals
with incidents of false imprisonment
of individuals because of their
"beliefs, color, 'sex, ethnic origin,
language, or religion."
The conference will focus on
cases. where the human rights have
been stripped from individuals be-
cause .of their personal preferences
and activities, through a series of
workshops, filmns and speakers.
"Hopefully, we will try to
strengthen students' commitment to
human rights, giving them new ideas
to. explore dealing with human
rights," said Vienna Colluci,
Midwest Student Program coordina-
tor for Amnesty International.
Between 250 and 400 students
representing 13 states and numerous
universities will attend "Student
Activism Day," which will focus on
Amnesty International's four-part
mandate.
The groups fight for:
the release of all prisoners of
conscience;
fair impromptu trials;
an end to torture and execu-
tions; and,.
a study of executions,-dealing
with judicial systems and
disappearances. .
The main goal of Saturday's con-
ference is to make interested college
students more effective human ac-
tivists by teaching them' important
and efficient ways to act on human
rights, Colluci said.
The U-M chapter. of Amnesty
International, which has about 20 ac-
tive members, will possibly be send-
ing two members of their organiza-
tion to the conference. Amnesty
treasurer Lucy Barnes and Ingrid

Hogle, chapter facilitator, may rep-
resent the U-M in Illinois.
Hogle said she hopes the confer-
ence will further enhance their
knowledge about the importance of
human rights in education.
"The conference should get stu-
dents more excited about Amnesty
and renew their dedication to it and
hopefully they. will get new ideas
about dealing with human rights,"
she said:
Amnesty International says every
individual is directly worthy to be
treated fairly as a human being with
certain undeniable rights including
the right to receive just treatment
'Hopefully, we will try
to strengthen
students' commitment
to human rights,
giving them new ideas
to explore dealing with
human rights.'
- Vienna Colluci
Amnesty International
with protection against inhumane ac-
tions and practices.
One of the organization's primary
goals is to fight false imprisonment
without fair trial, which members
feel 'is an example of inhumane
treatment. The workshops will
confront this issue by including
discussions about indigenous peo-
ples, India, Burma and the
Commonwealth of Independent
States.
Jack Healy; executive director of
the national Amnesty International
organization, will be the keynote'
speaker. at the conference. He will
give students insight into the options
they have and the importance of
their assistance in dealing with hu-'
man rights.

0
0

C

Buckets in the rain
LSA junior Tonya Clowney, of Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority, petitions
for money for starving children in Somalia.

ally

6

" "
-.
. !
Open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, our
copy centers "provide everything .you need to meet
impossible deadlines. Including our staff.

Religious
Services
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Clriistian R Rformed campus in itis rt/)
1236 Washtenaw Ct. 668-7421/662-2402
[ore block soutrcof CCRf I
EXPLORE and ENJOY your FAITH
kUNDA Y
l) a iii 'Morning Worshi}Y
"6 p.ni:-5ern'iri o{' praye~r. Ho!}' ('ornuinnion,
gnd Meditativesingimg
WEDNE SDAY
'1-10 p m -R.OCK Studet (at hering
Jin us for in , tt id.prxovC'atve discussion
Rev .Don l'ostemria, pastor
CANTERBURY HOUSE
(The Episcopal Clh ,'efi at the U to'M)
At St. Andrew's Church
306 N. Division
SUNDAY: 5:00p.m. Holy Eucharist
. 6:00 pm:"Dinner
The Rev'd Virginia Peacock, Chaplain
"Of'fices: 411 E. Washington Street
1le~elephane: 665-0606 "
EVANGELTEMP'LE ASSEMBLY Of GOD
2455 Washuenaw.(ut tintnrur
Van rides {rout campus, into: 764-4157
FIRST BAP'TIST CHURCH and
AMERICAN BA[PTIST CAMP'US CENTER
Hu ron Street (bet wee? Srtate & 1 ) isrn)
SUN DAY3S: "
Worship- 9:5 a.-
Adult Church School-i 1:20 a n.m
WEDNESDAYS: '
Student Fellowship Supper .
and Discussion-5:30 p.m.
For informtation, call 663-9376
George B. Lanbrides & Ann Smilev-Oven
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURC H.
Co're or State' aiiit rudiWVittm
LUNDAY: Cuhumunion-Douglas Chapel,
" 1Ua t
Worship Service-Sanctruary, 10:30 a.m.
I'I RST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
(Between H il & South ltmvt'rsitrt)
SUiNDA YS: "
Worship=-9:30 &0 11 am.
Campus Faith Exploration Discussion"
Bagels & Coffee Served---9:30 a.m.
tlndergraduate Su per=-5:30 p.m.
T.HIIRSDAY5'
Campus W orshi}i & Dinner-5:30 p.m.
For intfortmalion, call 662-4466
Atny Morrison, (Camipus Pastor
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
LORD OF LIGtIT I.UTHIERA N Ch URCht, ELCA
801 'South.Frert (at Hill t't't);668-7622
SUNDAY': Worship it) a.
W DN'SIAY: Bible Stud y 6 p .t.
Evening Prayer 7 p m
ST. MARY'S STUDENT PARISH"

5TH AVE. ATULBERTY 761-970
FrI: 4:50, 7:30,
450,7:30,10:05,
1 AJ 1\Te.'r Fri: 4:30, 7:05, ,
' RNS HR~lG~ IT,. 9c35 Sat, Sun:,
RU~sTHROG H T 9 11:35, 2:00,
A iL.M BY S TEREO' 4:30, 7:05, 9:35
RoacT RE roRD [;
- resen s oupon
When Purchasing A
Large Popcorn I
Receive One
I EXPIRES 11I3Q'92I
AIR FORCE ROTC UNITS
FILLED TO CAPACITY
NOT!
Don't believe everything you hear.
The Air Force continues to seek
outstanding students to fill future
officer requirements. See yourself
becoming a leader, graduating
from college as an Air Force
officer with fully developed
qualities of character and
managerial ability. Notice, too,
the opportunities. Like.eligibility
for scholarship programs that can
pay.tuition, textbooks, fees...
even $100 in tax-free income
each academic month. Visualize a
crisp uniform that reflects pride in
yourself and your ability to accept
challenge. Get the picture? Now
make a call! 747-4093
AIM HIGH--AIR FORCE
COPE.

PARENTS
Continued from page 1
Grand Rapids, will be going home
this weekend to escape from the
chaos of parents' weekend.
"I'd rather go home than have my
parents come here," he said. "I think
parents' weekend is more of an out-
of-state activity than an in-state
one."
"I don't know anyone else's par-
MSA
Continued from page 1
Coalition LSA candidate said, "We
need more money to go to student
groups. Only 10 percent of the
$500,000 actually goes to student
organizations."
Erika Gottfried, a Progressive
Party candidate, added, "Money is
squandered and should be spent
more on women and gay
organizations."
Conservative Coalition candidate
and LSA junior Tracy Robinson said
"MSA should provide more funding
to different organizations instead of
concentrating on special interest
groups."
"We need more equaling out of;
funding. Currently ... MSA funds+
both the Ann Arbor Tenant Union+
and Student Legal Services. But both
of these organizations do exactly the
same job," said Conservative

ents who are coming - either they
live too close ... or too far away,'
Wert added. "I think a lot of parents
don't bother with it - that's why
it's so special when they come."
Smolenski noted that he looks
forward to meeting his friends' par-
ents, and hopes some of them wil
attend fraternity parties this
weekend.
"It would be funny to see them it
that environment - maybe I'll take
my parents to one," he said. 4
Coalition candidate and first.yea
student Mike Christie.
Greenberg added, "MSA has
potential with budget and manpower
to be a good direct influence in sti-
dent lives."
Other candidates stressed the
need for MSA to play a role in im-
proving the quality of education at
the U-M.
"It is ... MSA's responsibility to
restructure their program to help the
academics here at Michigan. The U-
M has decreased in academic ranks
and has fallen in polls," Robinson
added.
Most new candidates said they
feel MSA is only utilized by a few
people in control. "People use MSA
as a soapbox to voice their con-
cerns," said LSA junior Marc
Chasteen, an independent candidate;
"They need to publicize what
they're doing a little more," added
Gearhart. '

Jil

'1

U'

1 1

The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter terms by
students at the University of Michigan.Subscriptions for bali/winter terms, starting in September via U.S. mail are
$155. Fall term only is $85. Winter term (January through April) is $90. On-campus subscriptions for falvwinter
are $35. Subscriptions must be prepaid.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and the Associated Collegiate Press.
ADDRESS: The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1327.
PHONE NUMBERS (All area code 313): News 76-DAILY; Opinion 747-2814; Arts 763-0379; Sports,747-3336;
Circulation 764-0558; Classified advertising 764-0557; Display advertising 764-0554; Billing 764-0550.

EDTIRA STAFF

Mathe D.Reni, Eitr i6 Cie

Open 24 hours
761-4539
540 East Liberty
Across from Jacobson's.
Open 7 days/wk.
662-1222
-530 South-State Street
In the Michigan Union

" Open 24 hours
747-9070' ."
- 1220 South University
Next to McDonald's
Open 24 hours
487-3008
1514 Washtenaw Ave.
1/2 Mi. W.of Water Tower

NEWS Henry Goldblatt, Managing Editor
EDiTORS. Andrew Levy, Melissa Peerless, David Rheingold, Bethany Robertsonri
STAFF: Adam Anger, Jonathan Bemdt, Hope Calati. Ken Dancyger. Lauren Dermer. Erin Einhom, Tim Greirel. Nate Hurley, Megan
Lardner. Robin utwin,.WiIi McCahili. Shelley Morrison.Yawar Murad. Marc Olender. David M.Powers.Mona Qureshi. Karen Sabgir.
Abby Schweitzer. Gwen Shaffer. Purvi Shah, Jennifer Silverberg. Johnny Su, Karen Talaski. Andrew Taylor, Jenniler Tianen. Michelle
VanOoteghem. Chastity Wilson. Christine Young.
GRAPHICS STAFF: David Acton, Jonathan Bemdt, Johnny Su
OPINION Yael Citro, Geoffrey Earle, Amitava Mazumdar, Editors
STAFF Jonathan Chart (Assocate Editor), Mike Chau, Rich Chc, Judith Kalka. David Leitner, Jason Lichstein. Katherine Metres.
Dave Rowe. David Shepardson (Editorial Assistant) Lindsay Sobel. Jordan Stancil, Brian Vikstrom.
SPORTS John Niyo, Managing Editor
EDITORS Jenr Durst, Josh Dubow, Ryan Herrington, Albet it
STAFF: Bob Abramson, Rachel Bachman. Paui Barger, Tom Bausano, Jesse Brouhard. Ken Davidoft, Andy DeKorle. Brett Forrest.
Jim Foss. Mike Hiil. Erin Himstedt. Thom Holden, BrettJohnson. Sharon Lundy, Seth King. Adam Miller. Rich Mitvaisky. Antoine Pitts,
Mike Ranriio. Tim Rardin, Michael Rosenberg, Jaeson Rosenfeld. Chad Sahran. Tim Spolar, Andy Stabile. Ken Sugiura.
ARTS .Alan J. Hogg, Jr., Michael John Wilson, Editors'
EDITORS: Canna A Bacon (Theater), Jessie Halladay (Weekend etc.), Aaron Hamburger (Film). Nima Hodade (Music). Roger Hsa r
(Fine Arls). Chnstine Stovey (Books).
STAFF Megan Abbott. Laura Aiantas. Jon Altsrul, Greg Baise, Melissa Rose Bernardo. Mark Binelli. Andrew Cahn. Jason Carroll.
Camiio Fontella. Patrick Kim. Kristen Knudsen. Alison Levy, Darcy Lockm an. Wiq Matthews. Michelle Phigip. Jeff Rosenberg. John
R. Rybock. Dave Skelly. Scott Sterling. Michael Thompson. Michelle Weger, Sarah Weidman. Kirk Wetters. Josh Worth. Kim Yaged.
PHOTO Kristoffer Gillette, Editor;
STAFF Enk Angermeier, Michelle Guy. Douglas Kanter. John Kavaliauskas, Heather Lowman, Sharon Musher, Evan Petrie. Molly
Stevens.

REG. COPIES
20# Whit;8.5x11
-v

(n
m
H-
171
C0

BUSINESS STAF

y MinerBusinss Mnage

DISPLAY SALES - . Amy Fant, Manager
ASSISTANT MANAGER: Greg Antlta
STAFF: Michael Barry. Jennifer Bayson, Yasmin Choudhry. Mokina Das. Jason Gabet. Gwen Gortinkle (Graphic Artist), Renee Huckle,
M 4 Eia ehs aacsn. Amv nnas. KriSin Kirby. Aartr Malik. Katrina Manettas. Rochelle Patterson, Julie Rogan. Monique;

6

I .

i

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan