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November 11, 1992 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1992-11-11

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Wednesday, November 11, 1992

Sorority will hold bucket drive to
raise money for African villages

Ihe Daily will publish position statements by the two major parties and independents
competing for assembly seats for the remainder of the week, prior to Michigan Student
Assembly Elections. Today's topic is the Statement of Student's Rights and Responsibilities.
MSA elections will be held Nov. 17 and 18.

6

by Kelly Bates
Alpha Kappa Alpha (AKA)
sorority members hope that students'
spare change will help bring real
change to impoverished African
villages.
AKA members will be conduct-
ing a bucket drive from 9 a.m. to 5
p.m. Thursday and Friday to raise
money to aid struggling African
villages.
The money will be used to edu-
cate town residents, improve the
community's health and living con-
ditions, and better the area's econ-
omy, said Yolanda Taylor, AKA
media correspondence chair.
The money will be distributed
through Africare House - a
Washington organization that spon-
sors groups raising money for needy
Africans.

AKA uses a different event each
year to raise money for the villagers.
Africare House designates the
fundraising projects and distributes
the money raised directly to African
villages.
Africare gives support to villages
south of the Sahara Desert in west-
ern Africa and a few villages in
northern Africa. The organization
does not aid South Africa.
In past years, sorority members
have conducted food drives, blood
drives, and clothing drives to benefit
the organization.
Unlike some organizations that
help African people, Africare sends
all of its relief funding straight to the
people, bypassing government
intervention.
"All the money we raise goes di-
rectly to the villages, none of it is

kept in any other form," Taylor said.
AKA has worked with the
Africare program for seven years.
Nationally, the sorority raised
$300,000 in 1990. Africare used
some of this money to buy sewing
machines so that African villagers
could produce items to bolster the
village economy.
"Donating the money for the
sewing machines helped them put
capital in the country and helped to
build within the village," Taylor
said.
Africare also purchased water-
wells to clean the drinking water in
Africa.
"There's a crucial problem in
Africa that there's not enough clean
drinking water," Taylor said.
She attributed many Africans'
health problems to the water
situation.

Conservative Coalition
"Except from that which is
required by law, we are
unequivocally opposed to any
code which limits a student's
right to free speech or
freedom of expression. An
institution should not be
allowed to infringe on
students' constitutional rights
and personal freedoms."
- Conservative Coalition
platform
Independents
Craig Greenberg, LSA
sophomore: "I am not in favor
of the code because I feel it
infringes on students' First
Amendment rights. The entire
United States is entitled to
First Amendment rights, why
should the University of
Michigan be any different?"

Amy Cox, LSA junior: "I'm in
favor of the general idea... but
I'm not sure that defining
specific behavior would be the
way to approach it."
Adam Hebert, LSA junior: "I'm
not in favor of it because I'm
not sure that it's the
university's responsibility to
do something like this.
Student rights should be left
to laws. Students also don't
have enough protection from
false accusations."
Lorne Gearhart, Rackham
graduate student: "In general I
am not in favor of it because
of the tradition of U of M
having students regulate
themselves."
Mark Chasteen, LSA junior: "I
really question a need for the

code and the right of the
administration to enact one.
MSA seems more concerned
about ...the wording of the
code rather than questioning
the reason behind it."
Progressive Party
"We are not in favor of the
Statement of Student Rights
and Responsibilities as
written. We are opppsed to
the principle of a code of non-
academic conduct coming
from the administration. If
there is going to be one, it
should be coming from
students, not the
administration. The
administration has eliminated
student decision-making and
is only accepting 'input'."
- Progressive Party
platform

0

OFFICE
Continued from page 1
our advertisements to be better than
our service," Harper said. "But
clearly our purpose is to help
students problem-solve."
Despite the lack of immediate
name recognition among students,
Cianciola said he thinks the office is
productive.
"It's going well. We're still not
where we need to be, but I'm
pleased with where we are,"
Cianciola said. "We have a long way
to go getting out announcements to
all students and having us be more
recognizable as a place to come for
help to get issues resolved."
Sloan agreed. "I wouldn't say
there have been a lot of students, but
traffic is increasing, which says
they're learning about the office,"
she said.
'Cianciola said both individual
students and student groups have
come to the office for help negotiat-
ing with the U-M or for advice on
other problems.
"It's also a safety net for students

so those who may fall between. ad-
ministrative or bureaucratic cracks
have a recognizable location to come
and we can assist them to help get
the best possible return for their
education," Cianciola said.
The office has advertised through
meetings with student groups and
advertisements on Union bulletin
boards, Cianciola added.
Nevertheless, some students said

I'd be intimidated because of the
name 'dean.' I'd feel stupid talking
about something small like grades or
a parking ticket."
But Sloan said she has responded
to many small problems, such as
student difficulties with parking, in
addition to addressing larger
financial and academic concerns.
"We're trying to have an office
where even if a student doesn't

I've never heard of it, but I think it sounds
cool.'
- Nicholas Dongvillo
LSA first-year student

they would not want to use the
office.
"I don't think I'd go to an office
with a problem," said LSA first-year
student Juliette Palmer. "I'd be
afraid of standing in line for hours
and hours like I do everywhere
else."
LSA sophomore Clare Gallagher
agreed. "If I was going to go there

know where to go to take care of a
concern they can come here," Sloan
said.
Some students said they thought
the office would be helpful.
LSA senior Fritz Pyen said, "At
least I'll have some resource to go to
for problems instead of making 10
different calls to friends to find out
where to go."

BEATING
Continued from page 1
Mayor Coleman Young, and a
spokesperson for the Detroit Police
Department knew nothing of the suit
and had no comment.
News reports conflicted yester-
day on whether and how much
Green resisted during his arrest
when officers were investigating his
car parked near a suspected crack
house.
A newspaper reported yesterday
that Green struggled and kicked
while two plainclothes officers tried
to take a package of suspected crack
cocaine from him.
The Detroit Free Press said the
account it received from an anony-
mous source gave the officers' ver-
sion of the confrontation with Green.
The account conflicted with
statements from civilian witnesses,
who said Green didn't resist, while
he was being beaten and kicked.
Seven officers, including a su-
pervisor, were suspended without
pay the day after Green's death.
Wayne County Prosecutor John
O'Hair's office said yesterday the
department had received some police
reports Monday night.
"They're not complete, but what
we have is under review," said Carol
May, an administrative assistant to
O'Hair. She said warrants may be is-
sued later this week, but she declined
to be more specific about timing or
charges.
Files given to the prosecutor's of-
fice include witness statements from
four civilians and four ambulance
service workers, lineup sheets,
homicide detectives' reports, an au-
topsy report, emergency services,
log sheets, photographs and a
description of physical evidence,
according to The Detroit News.
Services for Green were
tentatively scheduled forI11 a.m.
tomorrow at Hartford Memorial
Baptist Church.

AIDS
Continued from page 1
contraception, there's not that much
thought about disease."
Students, including LSA s; pho-
more Jill, said they protect wE~ ^m-
selves through their sexual habits -
namely using discretion in choosing
the people with whom they have sex.
"I'm not the type that goes
around having sex with a lot of peo-
ple. So I'm not putting myself in a
situation where I'm going to be
afraid. Obviously it is going to affect
my future behaviors," she said.
Lisa, also an LSA first-year stu-
dent, said she gets to know potential
partners well before having sex with
them.
"I have a serious boyfriend. Just
knowing that diseases are spreading
I want to know everything about my
sexual partner. I want to know where
they've been," she said. "If my life
ever leads me to being single and
dating, I'll know not to sleep around,
not that I would have otherwise."
A number of students, expressing
their concern about AIDS, said that
they abstained from sex entirely.
A male engineering student who
wished to remain anonymous said he
is choosing the only truly safe form
of sex.
"AIDS has made me choose ab-
stinence at the moment. It's been a
strong factor in that choice," he said.
Other students said the fear of
AIDS has had a large impact on their
sexual practices.
A first-year music school student
said she gets to know a person and
his sexual background well before
having sex with him.

"1 practice more safe sex. I al-
ways use condoms. It's not too big
of a fear because I know the people I
have sexiwith. I know their history
and their families. I'm close tot
them," she said.
"Basically (AIDS) has definitely
affected my attitudes. In high school
I heard about it, and the more you
hear about it, the more important it
becomes. I would never have a one
night stand," said Ernie, an LSA
sophomore.
Foreign students are equally - if
not more - concerned about AIDS
due to issues specific to other
countries.
"(In Zambia) it's changed a lot o(
people's attitudes. Everyone's afraid
of it. If a person loses a lot of weigh(
people think 'Oh, he's got AIDS.:
People go out of their way to look,
for sick people. Everyone's more.
careful. They use condoms and
aren't as liberal as before," said Sijo:
Parekattil, an Engineering senior
who grew up in Zambia. "
A 27-year old medical student,
from Freiburg, Germany said, "I'm'
obviously conscious about (AIDS).ry
wouldn't sleep with someone with-
out a condom unless I know them
very well."
Sadanori Horiguchi, an LSA
first-year student from Japan, who,
did a summer research paper on the
AIDS virus in Thailand, said, "I've
got to be very careful. If you are
careful enough it's not a big deal."
LSA first-year student Jason
Braidwood said the international na<
ture of the disease should make it a ;
top priority on students' minds.
"It's a big problem nationally anti
across the world. It's the biggesf
thing to think about right now,'
Braidwood said.

" MULTI COLOR SPECIALISTS
- ARTIST ON STAFF
- RUSH ORDERS
- NEAR U OF M CAMPUS
1217 PROSPECT, ANN ARBOR 665-1771
o0FF with this ad.

Look for it in the
Itherealwork:)::
The 11/6/92 ad for Gumby's
Pizza was incorrect. The'
"$1 Off Any Coupon Dinner
Special" is only available
from 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM,
Monday - Friday.

'I

STUDY IN ISRAEL
Zoe Olefsky, Midwest Representative for the
HEBREW UNIVERSITY
OF JERUSAL EM
will answer questions on:

r

'O 'Sulivan's
Eatery & Pub
1122 S. University . 313-665-9009
S , al Y ea BEt (11as 2m
Soup, Salad & Bread Buffet (lla.m. - 2p.m.) 4

1

M1 SA
Continued from page 1
for an open Rackham graduate seat.
But wide-spread dissatisfaction
with the current assembly could be
an advantage to their election effort,
Independents said.
"People I know are fed up with

parties," Chasteen said.
Most candidates said they felt
they could not identify with either
the Conservative Coalition or the
Progressive Party in terms of
positions on specific student issues.
"I'm going to take it issue by is-
sue," said LSA Independent
candidate Amy Cox.

0

DATE:
TIME:
PLACE:

Wednesday, November 11th
6 pm to 7 pm
Hillel, 1429 Hill St.

t r LLrcrr

* ,iO C

For more information:
Hillel, 769-0500

Perch Dinner (11a.m. - 10p.m.) "*
served with fries, coleslaw & dinner roll
Brunch (10a.m. - 2p.m.) $ 5 Dinner Buffet
Enjoy a variety of breakfast meats, hash (4p.m. - 8p.m.)
browns, 2 egg dishes, corned beef hash, Choose from 2 meat dishes, mashed
sausage gravy, pastries, & make your potatos, gravies, 2 vegetables, pasta
own waffles! & 2 different toppings, salad & dessertl

JI

i tchi ttn ttil

THE HEBREW UNIVERSITY OF JERUSAEM

pp

__

ell

M

The University of Michigan
Men's Glee Club
133rd Annual Fall Concert

Asian Pacific American Law Students Association
and the University of Michigan Law School
*invites *
Asian American undergraduates to
M /EET THE D3EAN1
Dennis Shields
Dean of Admissions, Michigan Law School
" the admissions process
" the Michigan application

The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is publishedMonday through Friday during the fall and winter terms by
students at the University of Michigan.Subscriptions for fali/winter terms, starting in September via U.S. mail are
$155. Fall term only is $85. Winter term (January through April) is $90. On-campus subscriptions for fal/winter
are $35. Subscriptions must be prepaid.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and the Associated Collegiate Press.
ADDRESS: The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1327.
PHONE NUMBERS (All area code 313): News 76-DAILY; Opinion 747-2814; Arts 763-0379; Sports 747-3336;
Circulation 764-0558; Classified advertising 764-0557; Display advertising 764-0554; Billing 764-0550.
1 S* ' ' 41p 'r S
NEWS Henry Goldblatt, Managing Editor
EDITORS: Andrew Levy, Melissa Peerless, David Rheingold. Betrany Robertson
STAFF: Adam Anger. Jonathan Bemdt. Hope Calali Ken Dancyger, Lauren Dormer, Ern Ewhon, Tim Gremei, Nate HurleyMegan
Lardner, Robin Ltwin. Wit McCahill. Shelley Morrison, Yawar Murad. Marc Olender, David M. Powers, Mona Qureehi. Karen Sabgir,
Abby Schweitzer, Gwen Shaffer. Purvi Shah, Jennifer Silverberg, Johnny Su, Karen Talaski, Andrew Taylor, Jennifer Tianen, Michtlwl
VanOoteghem. chasbty Wilson. Chistine Young.
GRAPHICS STAFF: David Acton, Jonathan Bemdt, Johnny Su
OPINION Yae! Citro, Geoffrey Earle, Amitava Mazumdar, Editors
STAFF Jonathan Chait (Assoaste Editor), Mike Chau, Rich Ch, Judith Kaka, David Lehner, Jason Uchstein, Kathnone Metres,
Dave Rowe, David Shepardson (Editorial Assistant}, Lindsay Sobel, Jordan Stancil. Brian Vikstrom.
SPORTS John Niyo, Managing Editor
EDITORS: Joni Durst, Josh Dubow, Ryan Herrington, Albert Lin
STAFF: Bob Abramson, Rachel Bachman, Paul Barger, Tom Bausano, Jesse Brouhard. Ken Davidoff, Andy DeKorle, Bett Forrest,
Jim Foss, Mike Hill. Erin Himstedt, Thom Hotden, Brett Jdhnson. Sharon Lundy, Seth King, Adam Miller. Rich Miafsly, Antoine Pitts,
Mike Ran"lio, Tim Rardin, Michael Rosenberg. Jaeson Rosenfeld, Chad Saran. Ten Spo"ar' Andy Stabile, Ken Sugiura.
ARTS Alan J. Hogg, Jr., Michael John Wilson, Editors
EDITORS: Carina A. Bacon (Theater), Jessie Hailaday (Weekendeta.), Aaron Hamburger (Flm), Nima Hodae' (Music); Roger Hsia.
(Fine Arts), Chisfino Slovey (Bookcs).
STAFF: Megan Abbott, Laura Alantas, Jon Altshul, Greg Baise, Melissa Rose Bernardo, Mark Binelli, Andrew Cahn, Jason Carroll,
Camilo FonlealIa, Patrick Kim. Kristen Knudson. Alison Levy, Darcy Lockman, Wil Matthews, Michelle Philip, Jeff Rosenberg, John
R. Rybock, Dave Skelly, Scott Stering. Michael Thompson. Michelle Weger, Sarah Weidman, Kirk Wetters, Josh Worth, Kim Yaged.
PHOTO Kristoffer Gillette, Editor
STAFF Erik Angermeier, Michelle Guy. Douglas Kanter, John Kavaiauskas, Heather Lowman. Sharon Musher, Evan Petrie,. Molly
Stevens.

November
Hill

14, 1992 - 8:00 PM
Auditorium

0
0

also appearing: The Friars
tickets - $10, $8, $5, $3 (student)
Lr. - - - - - i ... .t. . ;

gus NESS sT,

1my MlnerBusiess Mnage

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DlISPL AY SALES A mu CFmnt_ lsnnsam

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