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November 04, 1992 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1992-11-04

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Wednesday, November 4, 1992

2
0
D
Y
w
0
W
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-J
a

CLINTON
Continued from page 1
again. I ask you to look out not only
for yourselves, but for others, too,"
Clinton said in his acceptance
speech.
"We're all in this together. This
has been my attitude for the past 13
months of my campaign, and it will
be my attitude for the next four
years."
Clinton said he felt "wonderful"
as he wrapped up a campaign in
which he cast himself as the candi-
date of new economic opportunity
and appealed over and over for vot-
ers to summon the "courage to
change."
Bush vowed to ensure a "smooth
transition of power" to the new pres-
ident. He said he had telephoned his
congratulations to Clinton and
added, "I wish him well in the White
House. Regardless of our differ-
ences, all Americans share the same
purpose."
Independent Perot said "the peo-
ple have spoken," and offered his
congratulations to Clinton.
In Michigan - a key state in the
race for the White House - Detroit
Mayor Coleman Young celebrated
the Democratic victory. "It is all
over Mr. Bush. A new day has
dawned on the Potomac and ... a
new day has dawned on the
American people," Young said.
Clinton swept Michigan, taking
48 percent of the vote, compared to
Bush's 35 percent and Perot's 17
percent.
But, Sen. Don Riegle (D-Flint)
warned that Clinton's real challenge
lies ahead.
"As hard as this campaign has
been, the really tough job begins
tomorrow and he is going to need

00 f

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...........
.............
.. ...................
...................
% .........
..........
.............

each one of you more than he did
before," Riegle said. "With this vic-
tory comes the responsibility and the
duty to lead."
Ed McNamara, a Wayne county
executive, quipped that a Democrat
victory has been a long time in
coming.
"It's been 24 years, but we did it
... I think we should ask for a re-
count; we're not used to winning."
At local campaign headquarters,
Republicans offered explanations for
Bush's loss. .
"Obviously, we didn't do a good
enough job regarding the president's
vision for the future and weren't
able to convince people that the
types of changes George Bush
wanted to make for the country were
the types of changes they believe
in," said David Doyle, chair of the
state Republican party.
Michigan Gov. John Engler said
he expects that the people of
Michigan are looking forward to the
new Democrat-led administration,
but added, "Now it's Bill Clinton's
challenge to deal with Republican
governors and vice versa."
Chuck Yaab of the Republican
National Committee said Bush was
hurt by the student vote.
"They were looking for a change
they said. Clinton sounded the best
on the TV camera. They were frus-
trated with Bush."
- Daily Staff Reporters Saloni
Janeveja, Nicole Malenfant, Marc
Olender, Purvi Shah, Shannon
Unger, and Chastity Wilson con-
tributed to this report

270 ELECTORAL VOTES NEEDED TO WIN

Bush
Clinton
Perot
~~ Bush

121
363
0

Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
D.C.
Florida
Georgia

9
3
8
6
54
8
8
3
3
25
13

Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland

4
4
22
12
7
6
8
9
4
10

Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey

12
18
10
7
11
3
5
4
4
15

New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina

5
33
14
3
21
8
7
23
4
8

South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

3
11
32
5
3
13
11
5
11
3

0

Clinton
L Too close

- ANDREW M. LEVY/Daily

S, e fi
e' s
pBL oaa
ke eR .
, P+SSe y oo ';R l

FORD
Continued from page 1
were students."
Ford campaigned strongly for
Democratic president-elect Bill
Clinton. He appeared with Clinton at
the Ann Arbor rally after the third
presidential debate.
Mike Russell, Ford's press secre-
tary, said Ford is looking forward to
working with the president-elect.
"We've got a new president and
he sure is a dandy one," Ford said.
However, some volunteers said
Ford didn't need Clinton's coattails
for a victory.
"Bill Ford is running indepen-
dently from Clinton because he has
been in Congress for such a long
time," said full-time Ford volunteer
Robin Dronse.
Ford praised the record voter
turnout on cam pus and in
Washtenaw County.
"I've never seen as much dedica-
tion from the people. They have
taken time off on their jobs to vote.
We are going to make them all
proud of us," Ford said.
Kirk Profit (D-Ypsilanti) also

credited the Democratic victories to
the voter turnout.
"Student participation in the
camapaigns has been a refreshing
change. They choose their own des-
tiny. There's hope that America can
restore its greatness."
The closing of the Willow Run
General Motors plant will be a major
event in the district.
Willow Run employee Richard
Hess, said, "This is the first time I
have voted for a Democratic ticket.
The Republican party has gone away
from mainstream America. Bush has
personally been responsible in my
eyes for closing the Willow Run
plant."
Lincoln High School senior Eric
Frazier said, "I feel that students
have caused more people to vote.
Students have become more in-
volved in the campaign. I support
the Democrats as a whole."
Geake volunteer and LSA first-
year student Mike Christie said the
campaign was worth his time.
"It really hasn't been hard, I used
to debate in high school against a lot
of liberal students and I'm used to
having to defend my views."
- Daily Staff Reporters Nate
Hurley and Christine Young con-
tributed to this report

RIVERS
Continued from page 1
when 27 of 42 precincts had re-
ported, Rivers won 56 percent of the
vote, while Bertram captured 46
percent.
The winner credited her victory
to her largely democratic district,
specifically the U-M campus where
she said she focused a large amount
of time wooing student votes.
"The students certainly came
through," she said.
Edith Nickel, an Ann Arbor resi-
dent and professor at Eastern
Michigan University agreed. "We
got a lot of younger folks out cam-
paigning. Soon they will carry the
torch for us."
Rivers also attributed her victory
to her pro-choice stance on abortion,
saying her opponent is not a
champion of abortion rights.
"We need to code Roe vs. Wade
into the Michigan Constitution as
quickly as possible because it has
worked for us and it should be the
law of the land," she said in an in-
terview earlier this month.
"(Bertram) has been clear on his
right-to-life position."
Bertram noted that he and Rivers
held very similar views on key
issues in the Ann Arbor community,
such as tax reform and education.
"I feel good about what we've
done in the campaign, contrasting
me and my opponent," he said.
"We've stayed with the focus on
meaningful tax reforms, including
education and the economy.
"I intend to stay involved and

engaged in the political process,"
Bertram said. "Aside of the issues I
have conveyed the ability to make
things happen and the ability to work
together despite differences of party
affiliation."
Despite Bertam's loss, Dale
Apley, an executive with the
Republican campaign in Washtenaw
county, said Bertram garnered more
votes than President Bush in many
precincts.
Rivers said President-elect Bill
Clinton's triumphant campaign bol-
stered her bid for state office.
"It really was a back and forth, a
give and take relationship," she said.
Rivers previously served as. a
trustee to the Ann Arbor Board of
Education for three terms, also
serving as board president for three
terms.
Her victory immediately inspired
a celebration of what has been
called the "year of the woman."
"Its going to be real exciting to
live in a community where the
mayor is a woman, both state reps
are women and the state senator is a
woman," Rivers said.
"Its not exactly the year of the
woman, its the year of the woman
who worked hard," she added.
Rivers' policy goals include de-
creasing property taxes to entice
businesses into Michigan, improving
the state's infrastructure, and reeval-
uating public colleges and universi-
ties to minimize overlapping pro-
grams at smaller schools.
-Daily Staff Reporters Megan
Lardner and Adam Anger
contributed to this report

es Center

S withyour host
Josh Berg.
and student comedians
Brian Radbill
Chris Curtis
or more information
dial 763-1107

University Activiti

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las ma5 eeting
ass rn 4, rpm #
Iast m 11
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ntroduce over 1000 students or
parents to the U of M
work on a diverse and exciting team
run workshops and presentations
nake new friends, stay in Ann Arbor
for the summer
qualifications
-enrollment in fall 1992 and winter 1993
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compensation
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EDITORIAL STAFF Matthew D. Rennie Editor in Ghiet I

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NEWS Henry Goldbatt Managing Editor
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