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November 03, 1992 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1992-11-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, November 3, 1992- Page 7
s** di &Statistical abstract: Americans
prefer to walk rather than run

WASHINGTON (AP) - Americans spend more to
care for canines than cats, would rather walk than run
and are boning up on Japanese, according to the
massive statistical jigsaw puzzle that annually takes a
look at the nation.
The colossal compendium of numerical nuggets
known as the "Statistical Abstract of the United States"
goes on sale today.
Browsing through that mass of material can be
overwhelming, yet the details can provide delightful
diversion.
Owning a dog, for example, requires 2.4 visits to the
veterinarian annually a cost of $82.86. Caring for a cat,
on the other hand, leads to 1.6 vet visits costing $54.26.
The numbers come from the American Veterinary
Medical Association, one of a vast array of sources in-
cluded in the abstract, which contains the most recent
figures available.
Take the National Sporting Goods Association, for
example, which surveys people to learn what sports
they participate in.

That group found that the most popular exercise was
walking, involving more than 71 million people. Next
most popular is swimming with 67 million. Proving that
people would rather walk than run, joggers and runners
total only about 24 million.
The abstract focuses only on Americans and makes
no comparisons with people of other nations.
But it does show that Americans are making a
greater attempt to speak foreign languages.
For example, the number of U.S. college students
learning Japanese jumped from 11,500 in 1980 to
45,700 in 1990, the abstract says. At the same time,
those studying Russian rocketed from 24 million to 44.4
million.
French has ceased to be the most popular language
to study though, with Spanish having the largest number
of students, 533,600.
The abstract also reports that fifty-nine percent of all
households get cable television, 72 percent own a VCR.

MOLLY I bTVNWDaily

First in line
Voting machines around campus spent yesterday preparing for today's influx of voters. RC first-year student
Brandon Whitesell and LSA first-year student Adam Bryant sit next to one in East Quadrangle.

r

Write it. Read it.
Recycle itl
The Michigan Daily

FLOOD
Continued from page 7
lays, after they have determined the
value of the damaged journals and
books.
Fans and dehumidifiers were set
up to dry some of the less-damaged
books and journals. However, a sig-
nificant number are damaged beyond
rescue.
"Mold is insidious with paper and
glue," Pirmich said. "We'll probably
discard the seriously soaked ones
because we don't want to invite
mold," she added.
The chemistry journals - which
cost an average of $500-$600 per

year - were the most expensive
publications damaged, Pirmich said.
In February, the first of the three
recent floods, caused by a burst pipe,
flooded the chemistry library and
also caused the premature closing of
the computer lab on the third floor.
A chemistry experiment gone
awry last spring on the fourth floor
caused the second flood, when water
from an overflowed sink seeped
through the ceiling into the library.
The floods cost thousands of dol-
lars to repair equipment and replace
books, Pirmich said.
The library's closing will affect
graduate chemistry students, its most
frequent users, she said.

REBECCA cGOWAN
FOR REGENT
OF THE
UNIVERSITY OF
MICHIGAN
DEMOCRAT
Committed to Excellence...
...Accessible to You.
Paid for by Rebecca McGowan for U of M Regent Comm.
2210 Meirose I/Ann Arbor 48104

AAppl1ying to Graduate School in Psychology
The Life of a Psychology Grad Student:
Life, Work, ( and Time to Relax ?? ? ??)
Wednesday, November 4, 4:30 - 6:00 pm
Wedge Room, West Quad, 541 Thompson Street
Undergraduate Psychology Peer Advising Program
K-210 West Quad, 764-2580

' I

The Office of International Programs

The University of Michigan Pre-Dental Association
Open Meeting of the University of Michigan
Pre-Dental Association

INFORMATION MEETINGS FOR ALL STUDENTS INTERESTED IN:
ACADEMIC YEAR OR SEMESTER:
ESSEX, LONDON SCHOOL OF ECONOMICS, SAINT ANDREWS,
SUSSEX, AND YORK
Students may elect a year at any of the above institutions, or a semester at York or Essex.
Virtually all fields can be found at one or more of the 5 schools.
NOVEMBER 4, 1992 AT 5:00 IN ROOM 2440 MASON HALL
SUMMER SEMESTER IN FLORENCE, ITALY
Courses offered will include Italian Language, Italian Renaissance Painting, Italian Sculpture and
Architecture and Urban Development

topic: "Dentistry and Strategies to Gain Admission to Dental School"
panel: Moderator
Dr. Jed J. Jacobson, Director of Admission, University of Michigan
School of Dentistry
Panel Members - Dental Admissions Officers from:
Northwestern Pennsylvania - University of Detroit/Mercy
- Case Western Reserve
when: Wednesday, November 4,1992
time: 5:15 - 7:00 pm
where: School of Dentistry - Kellogg Audit. 1033 (2nd floor of Kellogg Bldg.)
who: All students interested in exploring dentistry as a career and/or
joining the Pre-Dental Association.
Questions? call Matt Fulton (President) at 996-5552

NOVEMBER 5, 1992 AT 5:00

IN ROOM 2440 MASON HALL

Please come and learn more about these exciting opportunities to earn University of Michigan credit while
studying abroad. This in-residence credit allows students to use U of M financial aid to help pay for the programs
and allows students to take courses not regularly offered on campus.
F I

5W

TEL

A CORPORATE PRESENTATION
SYNTEL, one of Michigan's fastest growing software service firms, is looking for a few bright young men and
women to take up entry level management and marketing positions. The company has annual revenues of
$30 million and employs 600 people worldwide. Corporate Headquarters are located kin Troy, Michigan.
The presentation will focus on SYNTEL's background and what the company can do for your career.
DATE: NOVEMBER 3, 1992
TIME: 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.

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