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September 10, 1992 - Image 47

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1992-09-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily/New Student Edition-City - Thursday, September 10, 1992 - Page 7

Stephanie Rosenbaum examines
Farmei
#S
by Travis McR+ynolds
Daily Staff Reporter

asparag
rs
it

One need not travel to Meijer or
Farmer Jack's to buy over-ripe
fruits and wilted vegetables, when
just a few blocks north of campus
the Farmers' Market offers locally
grown produce every Wednesday
and Saturday morning.
Twice a week, in the Kerrytown
parking lot, Ann Arbor and sur-
rounding area farners, bakers,
florists, and arts-and-crafters gather
to peddle their goods from booths
in an open-air market.
From freshly cut asparagus to
sweet-smelling zinnias, offerings
change with the seasons, but rest
assured the local fare is always
fresh, copious, and diverse.
"I like the Farmers' Market be-
cause it is the only place where I
can go, as a student, and buy organ-
ically grown fruits and vegetables
without any pesticides on them,"
Pete Shear, a Natural Resources
senior said. "Besides, I like to sup-
port small town farmers rather than
big industry farmers."
Shear said he likes the variety of
goods available at the market.
"We got a free cat there last
year," he said.
y Local bakers offer a plethora of
baked goods - oven-fresh cheese
. breads, varieties of wheat and rye,
French and Italian loaves, fresh

ii
SHARON MUSHER/Daiy
us at the Farmers' Market.
' Market
ie farm
ownA
muffins and coffee cakes are avail-
able in an assortment of flavors and
sizes.
The Farmers' Market is proba-
bly the only outdoor, covered mar-
ketplace in Ann Arbor where in the
thick of winter, one can buy freshly
pressed apple cider and warm
doughnuts
"I think the market is so cool,
you wake up on a Saturday-morning
and go there. I buy fresh breads and
vegetables, but they sell all sorts of
things, you can find furniture there
and all sorts of crafts," Cliff
Samanieto, an LSA senior said.
Due to time restrictions and their
fast-paced lives, students rarely find
time to travel to a farn to buy fresh
produce. The Farmers' Market is a
way to bring the farm to the city.
"You can't walk through the
Farmers' Market without buying
something," said Dan Ing, an LSA
senior. "It's a great place to find
fresh food from local producers,
right downtown."
Ann Arbor Farmers' Market is
located at 315 Detroit St. Hours of
operation are Saturdays from 7
a.m. to 3 p.m. and Wednesdays
from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., May through
December; January through April,
Saturday only. The Artisans'
Market is open Sundays from 11
a.m. to 4 p.m., May through De-

cember.
ood Co-op
rse fare
regular grocery stores. For example,
where else can one purchase
Organic Blue Corn Flakes, Veggie
Spritzers, meatless breakfast
sausage, or Ben and Jerry's
Rainforest Crunch ice cream?
The Co-op also carries an exten-
sive selection of herbal remedies
and medicines. Varieties of sea-
weeds, bulk grains and pastas, and
healthy snacks can be found along
side free-range chicken, and dol-
phin safe tuna fish.
"Some of the goals of the Co-op
are to support other cooperative
manufacturers, local producers, and
small business owners," said
Jacobs. "We also carry alternative
chemical-free cleaning products
such as mild soaps, and environ-
mentally safe, biodegradable
cleansers."
Jacobs said one of the Co-op's
major goals is to educate people.
"We offer paper products made
from 100 percent recycled materi-
als, whereas mainstream stores may

A look at prices for basic food items around Ann Arbor

White
Market

Dairy
Mart

Village
Corner Strickland's

Campus
Corner

Blue
Front

Hopin

Kraft .93 1.19 1.09 .75 .99 1.09 1.19
Macaroni & Cheese

Yogurt .77 - .77 .75 .79

Ramen .29

.25

.20

.29

r35

.39

THE

20oz. Ragu 2.55 2.79 3.09 1.99 2.99 2.89 2.89
Spaghetti Sauce

BASICSS

Lettuce .99.

.99

Nutter Butters 2.59 2.79 3.19 2.49 2.99 2.89

NOTE: Both Kroger and Meijer, supermarkets located off campus, offer better prices on most items than these on-campus establishments. But to go to either
one, you need a car. Prices are as of early June, 1992.
ANDREW M. LEVY/IDaly Grhic

'y

I

W14efcome to

VOTED
BEST CHINESE
RESTAURANT
By You, the
Student

f

I

People's F
offers dive

N
f
M
e
1
y
4
@1
}
4 .
6
y

by Travis McReynolds
Daily Staff Reporter
An alternative to the mainstream
grocery stores in Ann Arbor is the
People's Food Co-op. The Co-op
offers a variety of foods not avail-
able from normal food stores.
The Co-op sells organically
grown foods and chemical-free
products. It also offers items with
minimal packaging and environ-
mentally sound methods of
production.
The difference between the
People's Food Co-op and most
other food cooperatives is that the
People's Co-op is open to the pub-
lic. Most other cooperatives are
open to members only and offer
less expensive products to their
members. Members of the People's
Co-op pay $70 for a lifetime mem-
bership which entitles them to a 5
percent discount plus one share and
one vote in the Co-op. Members
who volunteer at the store four
hours a month are given a 15 per-
cent discount.

SZE-CHUAN WEST
Specializing in Sze-Chuan, Hunan,
Mandarin Cuisine, and Vegetarian Dishes
DINING-COCKTAILS-CARRY-OUT
* LUNCHEON SPECIALS
11:30 - 2:30
Monday - Friday
Many of your favorite dishes
for about $5.00!
* Half-price Mixed Drinks
* 50o Draught Beer
* Complimentary Snacks
* Daily Specials
4:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m., MONDAY - THURSDAY
SEPT.1 -MAY1
open 7 days a week

11

Monday-
Thursday,

1L

11:30 a.m.-100 p.m.

i

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