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October 21, 1992 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1992-10-21

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The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, October 21, 1992 - Page 3

Abduction
.charge
changed to
murder
WARREN (AP) - The man held
since May 11 in the kidnapping of
Deanna Siefert was formally charged;
yesterday in the 10-year-old Warren
girl's death.
Andrew Trombley, 22, was ar-
raigned on a charge of first-degree t
felony murder before 37th District
Judge Thomas Kennedy in Warren.
Betty Seifert, Deanna's mother, h !
let out a cheer when the judge or-
dered Trombley held without bond.
A preliminary hearing was
tentatively scheduled for Oct. 28.
Trombley has been jailed on a;
kidnapping charge since the day af-
ter Deanna's abduction from a a
neighbor's house during a sleepover
May 10.
He was arrested after a neighbor
told police she saw him and another
man carrying the girl out to a van. S h u
Deanna's body was discovered about oUthbu ndl
1 mile from her parents' Warren Agaggle of tired geese spend a mo
" house July 13. Officials have refused south for the winter. They said they
to say how she died.
Armenian leader lauds
campus cultural group
by Will McCahill LSA, Engineering, and the Business
Daily Staff Reporter and Medical schools.
' The sc ireme natrinrch of the The nrni ntin nln rriv

Support group
to help minority
psych. majors

by Chastity Wilson
Daily Minority Issues Reporter
Leaders of the Undergraduate
Psychological Association for
Students of Color (UPASC) say the
new organization for minority un-
dergraduate students majoring in
psychology will focus on combating
feelings of isolation.
Two LSA seniors started UPASC
last winter because many under-
graduate students were calling the
psychology department to ask if a
support system specifically for mi-
norities existed, said President La
Tasha Nash.
Although there is already an or-
ganization for the 1,200 declared
undergraduate psychology students,
UPASC was formed to "provide a
buffer for the overwhelming effects
of being one of a few students of
color in a classroom," said UPASC
Vice President Tonya Champion.
The UPASC will allow students
of color to meet other minority stu-

dents in psychology, form study
groups and trade old books and ex-
ams, she said.
The mass meeting for UPASC
will be held tomorrow in the Nikki
Giovanni lounge in Mosher Jordan
at 6:30 p.m. to attract psychology
students who are looking for a focus
in their studies or opportunities to
explore their area of interest, she
added
Members will explore opportuni-
ties available after graduation, in-
cluding applying to graduate school.
Social events planned are de-
signed for students to get to know
each other in a non-academic envi-
ronment, Champoin said.
Proposed events are holiday
potlucks, weekend get-togethers,
work fairs and an awards ceremony
for graduating seniors, she added. "
"When you're a minority in a big
university you might be the only mi-
nority in class. You need someone
who knows how you feel," Nash
said.

EIK .ANGEMEIER/Daily
oment of rest and meditation on a North Campus field before heading
were pleased with the accommodations.

Students 'sail'
through semester

is
c

I

Armenian church recently com-
mended the Armenian Students'
Cultural Association (ASCA) for its
fundraising efforts to aid Armenian
refugees.
His Holiness Vasken I,
Catholicos of All Armenians,
blessed the group for its efforts in
raising more than $2,000, which
they sent to the village of
Charentzavan, Armenia through
Bishop Hovnan Derderian, the head
of the Armenian church in Canada.
Club President Carl Bardakian
said many of the refugees in the vil-
lage of Charentzavan are children
whose parents were killed in fighting
in Karabagh, an enclave in
Azerbaijan in which 80 percent of
the population is Armenian.
There are also refugees from
fighting in Baku, the- capital of
Azerbaijan.
"It was a very emotional and dif-
ficult experience to see fellow
Armenians having to live that way,"
Bardakian said. He was in Armenia
for almost a month this summer, as
part of a relief mission sponsored by
St. Nersess Armenian Seminary in
New York.
The ASCA has about 80 mem-
bers from the U-M community, in-
cluding professors and students from

11rganza on1 a1so recelveS
strong support from business execu-
tive Alex Manoogian, who has also
helped fund the Armenian Studies
Program at the U-M.
So far this semester the group has
sponsored lectures and a fund-rais-
ing dance.
"We have a strong, committed
group," club Vice President Michael
Kadian said. He said that members
come from many foreign countries,
such as Iran, Turkey, Canada, Italy
and Lebanon.
"We welcome all members,"
Bardakian said. He said that while
many members are of Armenian de-
scent, there are also Arab and Jewish
members.
"Our purpose is to assist in
Armenia and at Michigan," he
added.
Bardakian said the ASCA has ex-
isted since April 24, 1915 - the
date the world learned of the mas-
sacre of Armenians by Ottoman
Turks. The slaughter continued until
1923, leaving more than one million
Armenians dead.
"It is a tragic part of our history,"
Bardakian said. He added the
group's main goal is to preserve
people's memory of the genocide, in
order to prevent such an event from
occurring again.

by Ken Dancyger
Since 1965, undergraduate stu-
dents from all across the country
have been experiencing a semester
out of their college careers on the
open seas.
The Semester at Sea program,
sponsored by the University of
Pittsburgh, attracts hundreds of stu-
dents each year to study on a ship.
"The intent of the program is to
provide comparative analysis of
global issues," said Paul Watson, di-
rector of admissions for the pro-
gram. "By comparing global and
economic systems, you can learn
more about your own surroundings."
Students can study anything from
anthropology to theater arts on the
S.S. Universe, an 18,000-ton
"floating university." Classes are
taught daily by visiting professors
who have had a variety of interna-
tional experiences.
All courses offered combine fact
with relevance to the countries on
the itinerary, including Japan,
Taiwan, Malaysia, India, Egypt,
South Africa and Eastern Europe.
"It is an intriguing concept -
taking the classroom around the
world," Watson said. "Professors
speak about their subject as com-
pared to the country, then apply it."
"It makes you stop and think,

looking at Tiananmen Square and
Taj Mahal," said Kerry Rader, an
LSA sophomore who was involved
in the program in fall 1991. "It was
beyond my wildest dreams".
"All of the times you spend in the
countries heighten your experi-
ences," added Diana Boll, an LS'A
senior who participated in the pro-
gram the same year. "We visited
drug rehab centers in Malaysia,
worked on food lines in South
Africa, and even traveled with
Bishop Tutu from Brazil to
Capetown."
Although some participants said
the program needs a more rigorous
curriculum, professors involved in
the program said that being involved
in Semester at Sea is an experience
students everywhere should try.
"You learn about every aspect of
life by studying and learning differ-
ent cultures," said Tevfic Nas,i, an
economics professor from U'-M
Flint. "It's academic theory and Ap-
plication - an educational voyage
recommended to all students."
The S.S. Universe is currently.:en
route to Malaysia, carrying 475 stu-
dents, eight from the U-M.
The voyage will end on Dec. 22
in New Orleans.

4

Reflections
An umbrella-bearing student, reflected in the puddle, strolls toward the
Diag yesterday. Burton Bell Tower looms in the background.

____

Student groups
Q American Zionist Youth Foun-
dation, meeting, Hillel Foun-
dation, 1429 Hill St., 7 p.m.
Q Field: Hockey Club, practice,
Palmer Field, 5:30-6:30 p.m.
Q Michigan Women's Rugby
Club, practice, East Mitchell
Field, 8-10 p.m.
Q Newman Catholic Student As-
sociation, U-M Catholic Stu-
dent Fellowship, 7 p.m.;
Centering Prayer, 7 p.m.; Saint
Mary Student Chapel, 331 Th-
ompson St.
U Phi Alpha Delta Pre-Law Fra-
ternity, meeting, Michigan
League,room land 2,7:30 p.m.
Q Social Group for Lesbians, Gay
Men, and Bisexuals, meeting,
East Quad, check room at front
desk, 9 p.m.
Q Shorin-Ryu Karate-Do Club,
practice, CCRB, Martial Arts
Room, 9:15-10:15 p.m.
Q Students Concerned About
Animal Rights, meeting,
Dominick's, 7:30 p.m.
U TaeKwonDo Club, regular
workout, CCRB, room 2275,
7:45-9:15 p.m.
Q Time and Relative Dimensions
in Ann Arbor, meeting, Mason
Hall, room 2439, 8 p.m.
Q U-M Amnesty International,
meeting, East Quad, room 122,
7 p.m.
U U-M Engineering Council,

Henderson Room, 8 p.m.
Q U-M Students of Objectivism,
"Why should one act on Prin-
ciple?" discussion, MLB, room
B 120, 8 p.m.
Events
Q "Capturing the Spirit: Por-
traits of Contemporary Mexi-
can Artists," Smithsonian
exhibit, Ann Arbor Public Li-
brary, 343 S. Fifth Ave., lower
level Multi-Purpose Room, 9
a.m. - 9 p.m.
Q Diwali Show, Indian American
Student Association, Power
Center, performance October
24, tickets call Malini Patel 668-
0686, or Ami Patel 764-8879.
Q "Does Truth Matter? Ameri-
can Politics Today," public
forum, Hutchins Hall,
Honigman Auditorium, 7:30
p.m.
Q "Focus on Michigan," photog-
raphy contest, City of Ann Ar-
bor Parks and Recreation
Department, accepting entries
until December 1, contact Irene
Bushaw 994-2780.
Q International Coffee Hour, In-
ternational Center, 4-6 p.m.
Q "Lesbian (In)Visibility in Ital-
ian Renaissance Culture,"
critical theory colloquium, lec-
ture, Rackham Building, West
Conference Room, 8 p.m.
Q "Nationalism, Revolution, and

U "Parametric Models for An:
Splitting Processes, Mixtures,
and the Secretary Problem,"
lecture, Mason Hall, room
22408,4 p.m.
U Rock and Fundraiser for The
Forgotten Tots, for children in
group homes and homeless shel-
ters, Legends Night Club, 415
E. Congress, Detroit, 961-5105,
8 p.m.
U "The Birthday Party," U-M De-
partment of Theater and Drama
performance, Trueblood The-
ater, tickets 764-0450, perform-
ing through October 25
U "The Nasty Girl," Max Kade
Haus free movie, Oxford Hous-
ing, Max Kade Haus, 8 p.m.
U UAC Homecoming, diag enter-
tainment, 12-1 p.m.; Karaoke,
U-Club, 10 p.m.
U "When Confidentiality and
Care Conflict," lecture, Medi-
cal Science II Building, South
Lecture Hall, 12 p.m.
U "You Can Quit!" University
Health Services program for
smokers, University Health Ser-
vices, pre-registration required,
763-1320, 12-1 p.m.
Student services
U Safewalk Safety Walking Ser-
vice, UGLi, lobby, 936-1000,8
p.m. - 1:30 a.m.; Safewalk-
Angeli -all, Angell Hall, Com-
--_ . __ -,rt n AL . 1r. A 11

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now served fresh at Mrs. Peabody's!
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PHOTO

Hair Styling with
a Flair
- 6 Barber Stylists
for MEN & WOMEN
" NO WAITING!!
DASCOLA STYLISTS
Opposite Jacobson's
668-9329

Pryfessionaf
Passages
A Career Symposium for
Graduate Students
Saturday, October 24, 1992 " 8:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
FouRTH FLOOR, RACKHAM
Finding aJo in Your'' n r
""'* . a S2i2etage o
.our pref e gtrat
e a spafe s ed pre-,eO tabeT 22 t

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