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October 19, 1992 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1992-10-19

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily-Sports Monday- October 19,1992
'M' Sports Calendar
Monday, October 19
Men's Golf at Stanford Invitational, all day,
Stanford, Calif.
Tuesday, October 20
No events scheduled.
Wednesday, October 21
Men's Soccer at Macomb Community
College, 4 p.m.
Thursday, October 22
No events scheduled.
Friday, October 23
Men's Swimming and Diving vs. Eastern
Michigan, 7 p.m.,aCanham Natatorium.
Men's Cross Country at Eastern Michigan
Invitational, 4:30 p.m., Ypsilanti.
Women's Cross Country at Eastern
Michigan Invitational, 4 p.m., Ypsilanti.
Field Hockey at Ohio State, 4 p.m.,
Columbus.
Hockeyat Ferris State, 7 p.m., Big Rapids.
Volleyball at Illinois, 7:30 p.m., Champaign.
Saturday, October 24
Football vs. Minnesota (Homecoming),
1 p.m, Michigan Stadium.
Volleyball at Northwestern, 7:30 p.m.,
Evanston.
Hockey at Ferris State, 7 p.m., Big Rapids.
Field Hockey vs. Northwestern, 1 p.m.,
Columbus.
Sunday, October 25
No events scheduled.
On Oct. 27, 1941, Minnesota and Texas tied for the
top spot in the AP football poll. Miami and
Washington are currently tied.

The top 25 teams in the Associated Press 1992 college football
poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Oct.
17, and how they fared in Saturday's action.

Team

Record

1. Miami (31)
2. Washington (30)
3. Michigan
4. Alabama (1)
5. Texas A&M
6. Florida State
7. Georgia
8. Nebraska
9. Colorado
10. Notre Dame
11. Boston College
12. Syracuse
13. Washington State
14. Penn State
15. Southern Cal
16. Stanford
17. Tennessee
18. Clemson
19. Georgia Tech
20. Florida
21. Arizona
22 Kansas
23. North Carolina St.
24. Virginia
25. Mississippi State

6-0
6-0
5-0-1
7-0
6-0
6-1
6-1
4-1
5-0-1
4-1-1
5-0-1
5-1
6-0
5-2

How they fared
beat Texas Christian, 45-10
beat Oregon, 24-3
beat Indiana, 31-3
beat No. 17 Tennessee, 17-10
beat Rice, 35-9
beat No. 19 Georgia Tech, 29-24
beat Vanderbilt, 30-20
idle
tied Oklahoma, 24-24
idle
beat No. 14 Penn State, 35-32
beat West Virginia, 20-17
beat UCLA, 30-17
lost to No. 11 BC, 35-32

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3-1-1 beat California, 27-24

5-2
5-2
4-2
4-2
3-2

lost to No. 21 Arizona, 21-6
lost to No. 4 Alabama, 17-10
beat Duke, 21-6
lost to No. 6 Florida State, 29-24
beat Auburn, 24-9

3-2-1 beat No. 16 Stanford, 21-6

5-1
5-2-1
5-2
4-2

beat Iowa State, 50-47
tied Virginia Tech, 13-13
lost to North Carolina, 27-7
lost to South Carolina, 21-6

MONICA
Continued from page 1
While many people participated
in high school sports to kill time
or to learn that they weren't the
next Jackie Joyner-Kersee or Larry
Bird, Monica's sport was therapy.
She joined the Henry Ford II
High School (Sterling Heights,
Mich.) gymnastics team to exercise
her Achilles tendons. Born with
club feet, Monica was advised by a
doctor to pay close attention to her
tendons and leg muscles.
"I was an overgrown gymnast,"
says the 5' 8 1/2" woman with an
effortless grin. "My feet brushed the
ground when I swung on the high
bar."
Monica still has to take special
precautions with her tendons,
stretching them often and avoiding
jarring exercises.
"I just try to deal with whatever
comes up, then go on to the next
day," she says.

With all of her responsibilities
(and all her successes), you would
expect Monica to have the
personality of Ivan Lendl, an
emotionless machine. On the team,
however, she is not known for her
stoicism, but her belching.
"It's kind of my trademark, I
guess." Teammates say it is not
uncommon to hear such an outburst
from Monica at practice.
"She's very good at it," agrees
her teammate, Alix Filson.
Belching is a less serious part of
rowing.
Another fun part, and the one for
which the crew team is perhaps best
known, is the Nude Mile.
Started seven years ago by the
crew team as a midnight, bare-all
dash through the Diag, the Mile
featured about a dozen runners.
Times are not recorded, clothing
sometimes disappears mysteriously,
and everyone has a good time.
Monica has run in the event for the
past two years.
"It's like a natural high. You let
yourself go for 10 minutes. It's so
natural," she says, "you don't even
realize that you're nude."
Somehow, like that kid in high
school who managed to be captain
of the soccer team and score a 1490
on his SAT, Monica seems to
enjoy everything, from the Nude

Mile to the miles she rows every
morning in pursuit of her dream.
This brings us back to her
qualification for the Olympic
development team. Monica
described her stay in Cincinnati as
her best rowing experience ever.
At the training center, she rowed
with athletes who narrowly missed
the Olympic cut, and got the chance
to use such high-tech facilities as
an indoor oval-shaped tank with
built-in boats, designed specifically
for rowing.
The development team was the
first of three steps on the way to
her ultimate athletic goal, to row at
the 1996 Summer Olympic Games
in Atlanta.
"She's got mental toughness,
there's no doubt about it," Filson
says. "It'll take a lot of hard work
between now and the Olympics but
she never gives up. She's got an
iron will."
Next summer, Monica hopes to
attend a pre-elite camp, the next
step on the road to selection camp.
"Rowing has made me realize
how much I can push myself," she
says. "A lot is expected of me, but
I expect a lot of myself too. I just
push myself and do it.
"When we're doing five-minute
pieces on the ergs (notoriously
painful), we say, 'That's just five

minutes out of your whole life.
You can do anything for five
minutes."'
Albeit short ones, five-minute
pieces, along with sprinting up
Harvard Hill (one block east of the
'Arb) or the stairs of the Dennison
building umpteen times are parts of
her everyday life.
For Monica, "getting through
this part" becomes getting through
several workout parts, which
translate into hours, weeks, and
months of training.
For now, her national team
hopes serve as a dangling carrot, an
inspiration during a grueling
workout.
"Even if I don't make it, I can
say that rowing has been a great
experience," she says earnestly.
But it's still fun to dream.
"It's not going to be easy," she
says. "Besides hard work, I've got
to get lucky somewhere along the
way."
As a past crew team t-shirt said
of its sport, "There is no finish
line," More than anyone.else, this
is true for Monica. Only it's not a
line she's aiming for. It's five
interlocking circles.
"When it gets really tough, I
think of the rings."
Best of luck, Monica. That's
bound to be the best part of all.

01

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Tuesday, October 20
5-7pm
Markley - Markley Library

NORTH CAMPUS
Wednesday, October 21
5-7pm
Bursley - Main Lobby

CENTRAL CAMPUS
Thursday, October 22
5-7pm
South Quad - East Lobby

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