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October 13, 1992 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1992-10-13

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Tuesday, October 13, 1992

DEBATE
Continued from page 1
uayle has got to think about his
6Wn political future," said Erwin
Hargrove, a political science profes-
sor at Vanderbilt University.
For Quayle, the debate also rep-
resents an opportunity to redeem
himself from what he concedes was
a, miserable performance in the 1988
debates.
Mark Gearan, Gore's campaign
manager, said Quayle is "a pretty
competent debater" and after "all the
comic stuff of the last four years,
punditude will dub him the winner"
if the vice president turns in an ade-
ate performance.

Gore's job, said Gearan, is to
"state the affirmative message of
what a Clinton-Gore administration
would be like, make the case for
change and reflect over the past four
years."
Stockdale, a retired vice admiral
and former prisoner of war, has been
on the sidelines during the pre-
debate posturing. He appears con-
cerned that because of his lack of po-
litical experience, he could somehow
finish the debate looking silly and
uninformed or with his prestige as a
scholar tarnished.
"It's a little intimidating," said
Stockdale, a senior research fellow
At the Hoover Institution at Stanford
University.

# a

RICHARDS
Continued from page 1
to vote for the Democrats. I think
that she will definitely get students
excited about the elections," said
LSA first-year student Patrick Javid.
LSA sophomore Sunir Garg said,
"A woman from the south who be-
lieves so strongly in the Democrats
is great. It is encouraging to see a

speaker who happens to be a
woman."
Dan Friedenzohn, co-chair of the
College Democrats, said, "She has
recently had to deal with running
against a sexist pig in Texas. It is
probably difficult for her to live in
the south and still hold a powerful
government leadership position."
Richards will speak at a rally on
the Diag at noon Oct. 26.

FORUM
Continued from page 1
affairs.
Billie Edwards, co-coordinator of
the U-M's Lesbian Gay Male
Programs Office, asked for a clarifi-
cation of the policy.
Edwards said she was concerned
with a line in the document's
preamble that says the policy
"protects the freedoms guaranteed
by the United States Constitution."
"It implies that lesbians, gay men
and bisexuals will not be protected
because they are not protected by the
Constitution," Edwards said.
Many student speakers said the
policy does not adequately protect
accused students.
David Schwartz, president of the
campus chapter of the American
Civil Liberties Union, criticized the
policy's hearing sessions, which de-
termine student guilt behind closed
doors unless the accused requests
otherwise.
"I think it's stacked against the'
accused.... Open hearings will en-
sure the policy be executed fairly,"
Schwartz said.
Rob Van Houweling, chair of the
Michigan Student Assembly's
Student Rights Commission, ques-
tioned why an accused student can-
not have third-party legal or repre-
sentative counsel.
The policy says the accuser may
have a third party file a complaint,
but the accused must speak for him-
or herself.
However, the accused may have
counsel present at a hearing.
"You're saying it's fair for stu-

dents to use an administrator to take
their case, but not let a student use
an administrator to defend them?"
Van Houweling asked.
While administrators are adamant
about not having legal representation
for the accused, Schwartz said he be-
lieves there are two solutions to this
problem: "Either don't allow third
parties to (file) complaints, or allow
the accused representation."
LSA sophomore Dante Stella
said he thinks the three-person ap-
peal board wields too much power
because its members work on one-
year terms rather than case-by-case.
"Can you guarantee they will be
equitable when they rule on cases?"
he asked.
Hartford reassured him that she
has seen policies similar to the
Statement of Student Rights and
Responsibilities work at other uni-
versities.
In response to a question about
whether the administration would
pay attention to a student vote on the
'policy, Hartford said, "Right now, I
don't know."
MSA representatives say they
plan to put the code on the
November campuswide ballot.
At the conclusion of the forum,
U-M Ombudsman Donald Perigo
identified several issues the redraft-
ing committee will take into consid-
eration.
He said the committee will:
address the suggestion of hav-
ing a public defender service;
outline an amendment process
for the code; and,
clarify language in several
sections.

0

MICHELLE GUY/Daily
A phone in one of the business offices at the Michigan Union. These
phones display the phone number of all incoming, on-campus calls and
the phone company of all long distance calls.

i
r
,

r

PHONE
Continued from page 1
privacy issues.
The American Civil Liberties
Union (ACLU) in Detroit argues
that callers may not want their
numbers revealed when calling
commercial establishments, gov-
ernment or law enforcement
agencies, and AIDS, rape and sui-
cide hotlines.
"Caller ID, and other
Automatic Number Identification
devices, should not be made avail-
able unless callers are given the
ability to control when, if ever,

their number is displayed on the
receiving end," the ACLU said in
a written statement.
The government is not allowed
to use Caller ID except for 911
emergency calls, unless a warrant
or other legitimate court order of
permission is previously issued.
Users cannot screen calls from
other area codes, because
Michigan Bell installs equipment
in clusters. As a result, callers and
subscribers must live near the
same central office.
Of the 19 states that offer
Caller ID, the sign-up response of
telephone customers ranges be-
tween 1 and 7 percent.

N

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WEEK
Continued from page 1
Planning Forum, an annual meeting
of the council for Disability
Concerns, discussion of the ADA,
and a panel discussion about the ef-
fects of the ADA.
Following the meeting for
Disability Concerns will be the pre-
sentation of the James Neubacher
award for people who have made
significant contributions for people
with disabilities.
The award honors the Detroit
Free Press reporter and columnist
who died of multiple sclerosis in
1990.
Also, in honor of the week, there
will be a live, statewide video con-
ference today featuring a variety of
products and services for disabled
people.

The U-M Services for Students
with Disabilities (SSD) office ser-
vices 142 disabled students.
Students with learning disabilities
constitute the largest number of dis-
abled students on campus.
About 20 to 30 people have vi-
sual impairments, followed by mis-
cellaneous disabilities, including
chronic health conditions, diabetes
and lupus.
Programs for campus events this
week were organized by the affirma-
tive action office.
Sponsors of the weeks activities
include the Career Planning and
Placement Services for Students
with Disabilities, the Council for
Disability Concerns, the affirmative
action Office and the Department of
Physical Medicine and
Rehabilitation.

ma o

Mayo Medical Center
Nursing Recruitment
P.O. Box 6057
Rochester, Minnesota 55903
1-800-247-8590

Mayo Foundation is an affirmative action and equal opportunity educator and employer.
A smoke-free institution.

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BUILDINGS
Continued from page 1
Arthritis when she was young.
"Narrow heavy doors and steep
ramps are a problem," said LSA
sophomore Kim Frania. "I've gotten
stuck on the ramps especially when
it's wet outside."
Frania said the UGLi and the
Law Library are the only buildings
that have given her problems be-
cause she could not get the doors

open.
LSA first-year student Heather
Livermore pulled tendons in her an-
kle last week, temporarily forcing
her to use crutches.
She said the main problems she
found while walking around campus
were the elevators and ramps.
"If you are late for classes, the
elevators take too long. I don't have
the time to wait. Those ramps may
be fine for wheelchairs but they are
hell for people on crutches."

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students at the University of Michigan.Subscriptions for fallwinter terms, starting in September via U.S. mail are
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I EDITORIAL STAF

NEWS Henry Goldblatt, Managing Editor
EDITORS: Andrew Ley Melissa Peerless, David Rhairngold, Betheany Robertson
STAFF: Jonathan Bemdt. Hope Calad, Lauren Dermer, Ern Einhom, Nate Hurley, Robin Utwin, Shelley Mordeon, Mona Qureohi,
Karen Sabgir, Purvi Shah, Jennifer Silvererg, Karen Talaski, Andrew Taylor.
GRAPHICS STAFF: David Aclon, Jonathan Bermdt, Johnny Su

Matthew . nneEitr CheI

ELVIS
COSTELLO
THIS YEAR'S
MODEL_
Including:
No Action
Radio adioj
The Beat
Up Service
Nand
In Nand
This Years
Gid
TOAD THE WET SPROCKET
BREAD AND CIRCUS -

THE THE.
INFECTED
including:
Infected/Heartland/Slow tIain lb Dawn
TheMecye

OPINION

Yael Citro, Geoffrey Earle, Amitava Mazumdar, Editors

OZZY OSBOURNE
NO REST FOR THE WICKED
cEs As-i..I Including:
Miracle Man/ Fi In The Sky
Breaing All The Rules/Crazy Babies

MEATLOAF 9'
Bat Out Of Hell
inchuding:
Heaven Can Wait/For Crying Out Loud
Bat Out Of Heil/Paradise By The Dashboard Light
Twon Out Of Three Ain't ad

STAFF:Erik Ban adk. Jonathan Chait (Associate Editor), Rich Choi, David Leiher, Katherine Metres. Dave Rowe, David Shepardeon
(EditorltAssistant). Jordan Stanch, Brian Vikstrom.
SPORTS John Niyo, Managing Editor
EDITORS: Joni Durst, Josh Dubow, Ryan Hermrgton, Albert Lin
STAFF: Ton Bausano, Jesse Brouhard, Ken Davidoff, Andy DeKorte, Brett Forrest, Jim Foss, Mike Hill, Brett Johnson, Dan Unna,
Sharon Lundy, Adam Miller, Rich Mitvalsky, Mike Rancilio, Tim Rardin, Jaeson Rosenfeld, Chad Safran, Tim Spolar, Andy Stable,
Ken Sugiura
ARTS Alan J. Hogg, Jr., Michael John Wilson, Editors
EDTORS: Caria A. Bacon (Theater), Jessie Ha'laday (Weekend etc.), Aaron Hamburger (FiM), Nima Hoda. (Music), Roger NOA
(Fne Arts), Christine Siovey (ocks).
STAFF: Megan Abbott, Melissa Rose Bermardo, Jon Altshli Greg Baise, Mark Binell. Adrienne Burharns. Andrew Cairn, Jason
Carroll. Patrick Kim Airson Levy, Darcy Lockman, Wi lMatthews, John Morgan, Jeff Rosenberg, John R. RybocLiz Shaw, Dave
Skelly, Scott Sterling, Michael Thompson, Micheile Weger, Sarah Weidman, Kirk Wetters, Josh Worth, Kim Yaged.
PHOTO Kristoffer Gillette, Editor
STAFF: Erik Angermerer, Michele Guy, Douglas KantbrHeather Lowman, Sharon Musher, Evan Petrie, Molly Stevens.

BUSINESS STAFF Amy n

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