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October 12, 1992 - Image 16

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1992-10-12

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Page 8 -The Michigan Daily- Sports Monday - October 12,1992

No. 7 harriers run by State

by Rich Mitvalsky
Daily Sports Writer
Despite competing without two
premier runners, the Michigan
women's cross country team turned
in a command performance over the
weekend at Central Michigan.
Against collegiate teams from
around the state, the seventh-ranked
Wolverines pounded runner-up
Michigan State in the Michigan
Intercollegiate Invitational.
With senior all-American Amy
Buchholz and junior standout Chris
Szabo abstaining from competition,
the Wolverines knew not what to
expect from the Spartans and prog-
nosticated a tightly contested battle.
The result, however, replicated pre-
vious Wolverine performances this
season.
Sophomore Karen Harvey paced
Michigan's victorious contingent,
breaking the tape in a course-record
clocking of 17:54. Senior all-
American Molly McClimon, return-
ing from an injury, continued her
successful comeback with a third-
place finish, three seconds back of
Harvey.
Sophomore Courtney Babcock,
frosh Molly Lori and sophomore
Kelly Chard rounded out Michigan's
list of top-10 finishers in fifth,

eighth, and ninth, respectively. Katy
Hollbacher, Jessica Kluge, Amy
Parker and Rachel Mann also fin-
ished in the top half of the field for
the Wolverines.
"We didn't know what would
happen in this meet without Chris
(Szabo) and Amy (Buchholz),"
Babcock said. "The last time we ran
against State and sat people out of
the meet, we only won by three
points."
This time, the Wolverines outdis-
tanced the Spartans by 23 points and
third place Central Michigan by 100.
And although the Wolverines clearly
dominated the meet, they weren't
overly enthusiastic about their times.
"We ran in mud, and the course
wasn't as flat as the one we ran at
Notre Dame," Babcock said. "It was
difficult to get going in the start, so
our times weren't as fast as before."
"I was a little surprised because
the times were slower than I thought
they would be," Harvey added. "We
have to get used to the mud and
sloppy weather, though. So far this
season, we have been spoiled by the
beautiful weather and the conditions
of the courses. From here on out, the
weather will be like it was this
weekend."
Harvey, who has consistently

placed in the top echelon of runners
at each meet this season, added an-
other meet record to the one she es-
tablished in winning the Notre Dame
Invitational.
"I felt good when I crossed the
line, and when I looked back in the
shoot and saw so many Michigan
runners, I was really happy," Harvey
said. "But I did feel pressure coming
into the meet, because Amy and
Chris weren't there. Usually Amy
takes the pace, but this time I had to.
I had to race differently this time."
With one kilometer remaining in
the race, Harvey employed a tactic
which seemed to catch her opposi-
tion off guard.
"I just took off when they never
expected me to go. They knew I had
a good kick, so they made me take
the lead from the start to try and
wear me down. But I played some
games with them, too."
Harvey wasn't the only runner to
surpass the course record, as
Michigan State's Misty Allison fin-
ished a mere one second behind
Harvey.
"I let myself die," Harvey said.
"Coach (Mike) McGuire told me I
was ahead, but I should have looked
to see where (Allison) was. At the
end I died, and I heard her footsteps
right behind me."
With only one week of intense
distance training remaining before
the squad tapers off in preparation
for the Big Ten Championships, the
Wolverines hope to eliminate any
glitches in their performances in up-
coming duals.
Next weekend Michigan hosts
Kansas, a meet in which all
Wolverine runners will participate.
READ
THE
DAILY
CLASSIFIEDS

AP PHOTO
Atlanta Falcon cornerback/Atllanta Braves outfielder Deion Sanders pulled off an amazing double yesterday, flying
to Miami for an afternoon NFL matchup against the Doplhins and then retuning to Pittsburgh for game 5 of the NLCS.

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Double di
MIAMI (AP) - Forget the ru-
mors about Superman's demise, al-
though he did need some intravenous
glucose before he limped out of Joe
Robbie Stadium yesterday.
Deion Sanders was keeping up a
superhuman schedule, flying from
the National League playoffs in
Pittsburgh early yesterday to Miami
to play for the NFL's Atlanta
Falcons and taking a flight right
back for Game 5 with the Pirates.
But he looked like a mere mortal
after his Falcons lost, 21-17, to the
Dolphins. He was dehydrated and
needed fluids intravenously and was
limping from earlier foot injuries.
He caught a nine-yard pass on of-
fense, was flagged a 47-yard inter-
ference call on defense, returned a
punt for one yard, made two fair
catches on punts, and returned two
kickoffs for a 21-yard average - not
exactly Prime Time's most spectacu-
lar game.
But his teammates were im-

uty for Prime Time.
pressed, nonetheless. After playing left field from the
"I have a newfound respect for seventh inning to the end of the
Deion," fellow corneback Tim Braves' 6-4 win over Pittsburgh, he
McKyer said after the game. "We was at Joe Robbie Stadium by 11:15
really appreciated him coming out a.m. and on the field by 12:14 p.m.,
here and doing it." warming up to return kicks and
"Everybody knows of his athletic cover the likes of Mark Duper and
ability," coach Jerry Glanville said. Mark Clayton.
"What's inside him is even bigger." He left the stadium in a limo at
He started his day by climbing 4:55 p.m. to a waiting helicopter and
onto a private jet at Allegheny 30 minutes later he was rushed
County Airport outside Pittsburgh aboard a private jet from Opa-locka
and arrived at a small jetport near Airport to Pittsburgh, wearing sun-
Miami about 4 a.m. glasses,,sandals and a bright design
As he left the plane, he told re- shirt and shorts.
porters he had been warned "there'd
be days, but never like this." He was Sanders got called on the 47-yard
then shuttled to the Sheraton in Fort interference on Duper at the 27-
Lauderdale about 4:40 a.m. yard-line in the second quarter, but
Dressed in a blue outfit, he Dolphins kicker Pete Stoyanovich
walked from his limo into the hotel, later missed a 50-yard field goal at-
but even Neon Deion appeared to be tempt. He almost got called for
dimming. interference two plays after the first
"He looked dead tired," said 17- penalty call but the ball was ruled
year-old autograph hound Brian uncatchable. He caught a nine-yard
Grieper of Hollywood, Fla. "His pass on the next Falcons drive that
eyes were almost shut." resulted in a 52-yard field goal.

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Blue Jays
one step
away from
Fall Classic
OAKLAND (AP) - Never let it
be said again that the Toronto Blue
Jays are chokers.
Criticized for years as the best
team in baseball that could not win
the big game, the Blue Jays matched
the biggest comeback in playoff
history yesterday, stunning Oakland,
7-6, in 11 innings.
Pat Borders' sacrifice fly in the
11th was the official game-winner
and gave Toronto a 3-1 edge in the
AL series. But this one will forever
be remembered for Roberto
Alomar's shocking, two-run homer
off Dennis Eckersley in the ninth
that tied it and completed a sensa-
tional, five-run rally against the A's
and perhaps the most dominant re-
liever of all-time.
"I wasn't here when they didn't
win in the past," Alomar said. "I
just want to be here in the present
when we win the big one, so we
won't have to hear anymore about
the past."
In one of baseball's most stun-
ning turnarounds since Kirk
Gibson's 1988 World Series home
run, Eckersley again was the victim.
Aside from batting left-handed,
Alomar, who had four hits, bears no
resemblance to Gibson. But to the
Blue Jays - and to Eckersley -
what he did almost was the same.
Devon White led off the ninth
with a single that skipped past
Rickey Henderson in left for a two-
base error. That brought up Alomar,
and he launched a drive high and
deep to right, as did Gibson, for the
tying home run.
Alomar's homer accounted for
the biggest turnaround in a major-
league game since Gibson's homer.
And, more importantly, it put
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AP PHOTO
Toronto's Roberto Alomar stunned the Oakland A's yesterday with a game-
tying two-run homer off relief ace Dennis Eckersley in the top of the ninth.

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