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September 10, 1992 - Image 30

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The Michigan Daily, 1992-09-10

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01

Page 2-The Michigan Daily/New Student Edition-University - Thursday, September 10, 1992

Campus Info Center
gives all the answers
by Wendy Law
Daily Staff Reporter - anything from restaurants to fi-

Students research,
study, socialize in

Feeling lost on campus? Don't
know how to find Lorch Hall?
Trying to find out what the regents
really do? Curious if there is life in
Ann Arbor outside of the
University?
The Campus Information Center
(CIC) is here to answer these
questions.
The CIC is a service organiza-
tion affiliated with Orientation that
fulfills the needs of the University's
students, faculty, staff, and visitors
by providing information about

nancial aid to hotels.
The CIC also allows students to
access information through phone
and computer lines. For students
who are stumped, the CIC can be
contacted by phone at 763-INFO.
Current film and event listings are
available by calling 763-FILM and
76E-VENT.
Students who have a computer
and modem can receive campus-
wide info, film listings, and current
events information through the UM-
CIC database on the MTS network.

'U,
by Rachel K
Daily Staff Rep

These information troubleshooters know
about everything listed in the Student
Directory and all University offices. They can
give directions around Ann Arbor and
campus. They even know the equation for
the circumference of a circle and the phases
of the moon.

i

Where do
want to find a 1
Civil Rights m
from the sixte
about an AID
campus weathe
And where do
need to get o
study or sociali
The library,
The only<
one?
The Univer
is comprised o
campus excep
Business librar
and Clements
University Li
largest in the r
lection size, s
dean of the U
Riggs added th
best mathemat
United States.
"Our library
sure," he said.
University
when it comesI
brary. It all boi
vironment t
Undergraduate
generally cons
whereas the1
quieter.
"People are
grad). There'sa
said LSA junio
"That's ex,
study there,"

ibrary stacks
atz Cathie Levine. "I need the
porter distraction."
you go when you The UGLi is certainly a more
book of songs of the social place to study and meet
ovement? Or a map friends. "The only time I'd want to
enth century? How come here is to study with other
S bibliography? Or people," said LSA junior Kerri
r reports since 1988? Berkman.
you go when you Catherine Waterfield, an LSA
ut of your room to junior, said "many people go to the
ze? reading room at the grad or to the
of course. law library more to be seen than to
question is, which study."
Most students will need to use
sity Library system the library for term paper research
f all the libraries on some time within their first year at
t for the Law and the University. For most, enough
ries and the Bentley resources are available at the UGLi.
s collections. The "It's relatively easy to find mate-
brary is the fifth rials at the UGLi so I go there
nation based on col- first," said LSA senior Grace Rim.
;aid Donald Riggs, MIRLYN - the University's
niversity Libraries. computerized card catalog - can
at the library has the be a challenge when students first
ics collection in the arrive.
"It took me a while to get used
y is a national trea- to it," said LSA sophomore
Gabrielle Civil. "It's a lot easier
students are picky when you know specifically what
to studying at the li- book you need."
ils down to what en- Lynne Westbrook, a librarian at
hey want. The the UGLi said staffers answer ap-
Library (UGLi) is proximately 200 questions a
idered more social, dayduring the Fall and Winter
graduate library is terms.
Librarians are also there to teach
more serious (at the students how to use the library sys-
a better atmosphere," tem, she said.
r Andrew Bronsnick. "We teach someone how to find
actly why I don't and evaluate information on any
said LSA junior See LIBRARIES, Page 11

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University and city services, organi-
zations, and events.
It also provides service to
University departments and organi-
zations by acquainting students with
various offerings and assisting in
their appropriate use.
The CIC was founded in 1980 in
response to frustration with the diffi-
culty of getting information on
campus.
The CIC is located at a semi-cir-
cular desk in the first floor lobby of
the Michigan Union.
Student staffers are available to
answer questions from 7 a.m. to 2
a.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 9
a.m. to 1 a.m. Sundays, and 7 a.m. to
1 a.m. Mondays. These information
troubleshooters know about every-
thing listed in the Student Directory
and all University offices. They can
give directions around Ann Arbor
and campus. They even know the
equation for the circumference of a
circle and the phases of the moon.
The CIC also has Info To Go
terminals set up at Orientation and in
the Alumni Center. These terminals
offer a broad range of information
about the University and Ann Arbor

The UM-Go For Blue database is
also open for consultation on the
MTS network. These networks can
be accessed at any University com-
puting center.
The CIC publishes the Student
Handbook and the Rounding Out A2
handbook guides each Fall to give
undergrad and grad students on-hand
info to help them acclimate to
University life. Both handbooks are
available through Orientation, vari-
ous offices on campus, and can be
purchased at campus bookstores.
The CIC also provides bulletins,
maps, schedules, brochures, and
news publications.
Members of the CIC and the
Alpha Phi Omega service fraternity
also answer student questions at
miniature information booths around
campus at the start of Fall term.
The CIC has a satellite desk in
the North Campus Commons lobby
which provides in-depth information
about the North Campus area and its
schools and colleges. The North
Campus Information Center is open
from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday
through Friday and can be reached
by phone at 763-NCIC.

I I

SHARON MUSHER/Dali
"Serious" students like to do their studying at the grad, which is said to be
quieter than other campus libraries. Its stacks, however, are much more
confusing.

I

CP&P helps put students on the

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by Laura Potts
Daily Staff Reporter
What's your major?
It's a question you'll hear repeat-
edly at the University, and from
relatives at family gatherings.
You can respond "undecided" for
a while - maybe even for a few
years. But sooner or later you'll have
to stop living off your parents'
money and make a career for
yourself.
Before you decide on a career,
you need a major, or concentration,
as the University calls it. But beware
- most people don't have a con-
centration in an area in which they
will actually work in the future.
Career Planning and Placement
(CP&P) assistant director Tom
Lehker could also tell you that the
average person changes careers three
to five times and has 10-15 different
jobs in a lifetime.
CP&P has a great deal to offer
students whosneed help deciding on
a career or concentration, as well as
students who have known they were

going to be doctors, computer opera-
tors, or English teachers since they
were eight.
Each year CP&P hosts an aver-
age of 300 programs on various top-
ics, including career choices, gradu-
ate programs, and job search tactics.
First, you may want to attend a
tour of the facility. These are usually
offered in the first few months of
Fall term.
Then you could attend one of the
sessions devoted to exploring career
options, such as "Choosing Your
Major," the "Minority Career
Conference Workshop," or "Opport-
unities in U.S. Government and
Foreign Affairs."
Once you decide on an area of
study, and the time to enter the "real
world" is nearing, you will probably
want to attend one of two types of
workshops - those on graduate, law
and medical schools, or those on the
job search process.
Of course, CP&P offers all of
these - from practice interviewing
for medical schools to applying for

graduate schools to writing your re-
sume. CP&P will be sending a
schedule of this year's events to new
students at the beginning of fall
term.
While programs and seminars are
important, they are not the only ad-
vice and aid CP&P has in store for
you.
CP&P also hosts the On-Campus
Recruitment Program, which high-
lights open houses by major poten-
tial employers. Attend these infor-
mation sessions to receive help with
interviewing skills, to learn more
about potential jobs, and possibly to
even land that once-in-a-lifetime job.
Other services are available at the
office. CP&P has an extensive career
library, as well as pamphlets from
graduate, law and medical schools.
CP&P also has information about
internships, long-term employment
opportunities and summer job
openings. SIGI plus is a comput-
erized system of interactive guidance
and information given through
CP&P.

ight track
One of the most helpful services
CP&P offers is a reference letter
service. Here's a hint: open a file
now. Once you have a file, and have
buttered up a professor or TA
enough, you just give them a form
and ask for a recommendation.
You'd be surprised how difficult it is
to get three letters of recommenda-
tion at the last minute from profes-
sors who don't have the time and
don't even remember who you are
anyway.
CP&P also staffs career coun-
selors. You can go in for an hour-
long appointment to ask questions
about classes, concentrations, and
careers. They also have afternoon
walk-in counseling to answer short
questions, or to give feedback on
your resume.
Whatever your career goals are,
go to CP&P yourself and take
advantage of all the services
available to you. CP&P is located at
3200 in the Student Activities
Building.

Join the Team'!

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Capturing the gracious elegance of a
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Choose from sixty-six rooms and suites exquisitely
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Make your next stay in Ann Arbor
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Phone or stop by the Dining Services Office of any hall

Bursley ............763-1121
East Quad......764-0136

Mosher Jordan...763-9946
Markley ...........764-1151

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