100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 30, 1992 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1992-09-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily- Wednesday, September 30, 1992 - Page 11

Kickers take on Schoolcraft

MEN WOMEN
1. Arkansas 1. Villanova
2. Wisconsin 2. Arkansas

Men hope to break out of slump

Women try to extend win streak

3. Arizona
4. Iowa State
(tie) Villanova
6. Notre Dame
7. Providence
8. MICHIGAN
9. Washington
10. South Florida
11. Wake Forest
12. Brigham Your
13. North Carolin
14. Penn State
15. Kansas
16. Air Force
17. Navy
18. Colorado
19. Oregon
20. Georgetown
21. Tennessee
22. Eastern Michi
23. New Mexico
24. East Tennessi
25. Montana Stat

3. Northern Arizona
4. Cornell
5. Wisconsin
6. Providence
7. Arizona
8. Alabama
9. Brigham Young
10. Georgetown
11. MICHIGAN
12. Penn State
13. Virginia
14. California-Irvine
15. Oregon

by Mike Rancilio
Daily Sports Writer
While on a quest for a title, true
champions barrel through adversity
and disappointment to rise above
their competition.
The Michigan men's soccer club
is staring at a 4-8-1 record - a re-

ng
a State

16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.'
23.
24.
25.

Iowa
Nebras
Baylor

ka

gan
ee State
e

Georgia
Iowa State
Colorado
Washington
Mississippi State
Michigan State
Massachusetts

suit of inconsistent play. However,
with the majority of its tough oppo-
nents behind it and the possibility of
winning the Big Ten Club Champi-
onship still looming, the team hopes
to catapult itself through its present
adversity in tonight's match against
Schoolcraft.
"We need to concentrate a little
better (tonight) and that will make us
more consistent," coach Aaron
Smith said. "I still like our chances
(at the Big Ten Club Tournament)."
After splitting the weekend
games on the road, with a defeat at
the hands of Wisconsin-Parkside and
a victory over Notre Dame, the
Wolverines returned home to a rig-
orous practice Monday. The strin-
gent practice was geared to decrease
defensive lapses and concentration
breaks.
"The practice was pretty intense,"
junior Reza Sadjapour said. "If you
weren't at your mark, (assistant
coach Steve Burns) got really
pissed."
Burns ran the practice in an effort
to get the team on track. The philos-

ophy seems to have had a lasting ef-
feet on the players.
"We had a real good, tough prac-
tice," co-captain Scott Seabolt said.
"We are pretty confident with the
rest of our season."
Really confident, in fact.
"We are looking to beat the s---
out of every Division II and junior
college team," Sadjapour.said.
Unfortunately for Schoolcraft, it
is a junior college. Although the
Ocelots are nationally ranked and
possess a good kick-and-run game,
Michigan has added motivation.
"We didn't beat them last year,
so revenge is a factor," Smith said.
'We need to
concentrate a little
better (tonight), and
that will make us more
consistent.'
- Aaron Smith
Men's soccer coach
Sadjapour transformed this brute
reasoning into an imperialistic
stratagem.
"We have to score early, because
junior college teams lack mental
toughness. If you score early they
will fold," he said.

Field, kickoff coming at 4:30. Fri-
day's matchup has Michigan travel-
ing to Bowling Green to face the
Falcons in a 5:30 start.
The two-game stretch offers the
5-5-3 Wolverines an opportunity to
raise their record over .500 for the
season.
Back-to-back games are not un-
usual for the team. Although getting
tired in the second game might ap-
pear to be a problem, this prospect
doesn't concern the kickers.
"We're used to playing two
games in a row," sophomore Kim
Chenet said. "The tournaments
we've played in have always been
that way. Sometimes you are a little

by Jesse Brouhard
On a roll after two straight victo-
ries, the women's soccer team will
try to stretch its hot streak to four
with two contests on consecutive
days.
Tomorrow, the Wolverines face
Schoolcraft College at Mitchell

tired by that second game though."
The team will try to follow up on
the strong points of Sunday's 6-1
victory over Valparaiso. Five
Wolverines tallied goals, and Michi-
gan will need to get contributions
from everybody in order to keep
players fresh over the course of the
two games.
Tenacious defense and capitaliz-
ing on scoring opportunities have
been major themes on which the
squad has been focusing.
"In practice, we have been work-
ing on polishing our game," Chenet
said. "This consists of finishing
shots on goal and being aggressive."
The offense benefited from ag-
gressive play Sunday during a four-
goal second half outburst.
Playing the game at Mitchell
Field will be a welcome change after
the hard surface conditions encoun-
tered Sunday at torn up Elbel Field.
The softer turf at Mitchell should al-
low more passing, thus enabling
Michigan to utilize a more coordi-
nated offensive attack.

Griddes
You too can have the pleasure of picking the winner in the
legendary battle between Colgate and that band of NFL
prospects known as the Columbia Lions.
All you have to do is turn in all of your Griddes picks by
Friday at noon to the Student Publications Building at 420
Maynard Street. If you win, you will receive the vaunted $15
gift certificate to O'Sullivan's Eatery & Pub.

17.i
pV wzSin en c'rvyz, n attenodLz a 'i~czz
(]uedezdki a~u yurd 'ht bsLi'ose i de la vi.

Live.helieve me in this matter, do not wait until tomorrow.
Gather the roses of life starting today.
Pierre de Ronsard (1525-158.5)

1. Iowa at Michigan
2. Indiana at Michigan St.
3. Illinois at Minnesota
4. Ohio St. at Wisconsin
5. Northwestern at Purdue
6. Penn State at Rutgers
7. Stanford at Notre Dame
8. Florida St. at Miami
9. Southern Cal at Washington
10. Texas Tech at Texas A&M
Tiebreaker: Total points - Iowa.

11. South Carolina at Alabama
12. Tennessee at Lousiana St.
13. UCLA at Arizona
14. Iowa St. at Oklahoma
15. N. Carolina St. at Georgia Tech
16. Georgia at Arkansas
17. Kentucky at Mississippi
18. Vanderbilt at Auburn
19. Ball St. at Western Michigan
20. Columbia at Colgate
at Michigan

SEMESTER OR YEAR ABROAD
The American University of Paris
is a four-year liberal arts college in
Paris welcoming visiting students.
Majors in: Art History,
Comparative Literature, Computer
Science, European Studies, French
Studies, International Affairs,
Internatinal Business Administra-
tion, International Economics, and
Fine Arts at Parsons School
of Design.
Two programs especially de-
signed for visiting students:
The Institute for French Studies
in Paris (IFSP) offers students with
strong French language proficiency
the chance to combine their studies
at AUP with courses at the Institut
d'Etudes Sociales, Institut National
des Langues et Civilisations
Orientales, Universite de Paris IV-
Scrbonne, and Institut d'Etudes
Politiques ( Sciences-Po').

The Program in European Affiirs
(PEA) allows students to select Europe-
focused courses from three of our
majors and to integrate them through
an on-going seminar. Year-long
students may qualify for international
affairs internships in their second
semester.
" 1000 students from 70 different
countries.
. 40% U.S. citizens, 14% French.
" In 1991-92, 12% visiting students.
. Housing is guaranteed.
Full college credit summer courses:
" Three-week French immersion.
" Six-week regular summer session.
THE
AMERICAN UNIVERSITY
OF PARIS
cta),)se o oeplt ,) 'iitci,'iiifl('t sftper price
I ..i, ciur i-.quvi ill) I'n fr m,-

I
Ilt
I

Name:
Phone:

STICKERS
Continued from page 10
playing our game," defender Lelli
Hose said. "We talked about going
to the wings and improving our
speed and our spacing. We were
*panicking in the first half."
In the second half, the
Wolverines played a little better and
came up with what Smith said was
the one bright spot of the game, a
goal off of a penalty corner. Senior
Katie Vignevic centered the ball to
Kalli Hose, who hit Keely Libby
with a pass for an open-net shot. The
goal gave the team a 2-0 lead with

23:36 left in the game.
The goal seemed to spark the
Wolverines, who started to control
the ball better. With four minutes
left, Libby came up with a save off
of a Redskin penalty corner to
preserve the shutout.
Smith said the team never really
looked sharp, and she was glad to
get the first home game out of the
way.
"They were a reactive team and
we never really adjusted to it,"
Smith said. "We weren't focused
and our concentration was bad. I'm
glad to have our first home game
under our belt."

DANCE THEATRE 1 993
Impact Dance Theatre is for Co-Ed Non-Dance Majors
1,
- AUDITIONS r
Wednesday and Thursday,
September 30th and October 1 st
6-10 pm, Michigan Union Ballroom

s m crdrmcd o hp th N ds\lk Sat- As,,iiof Schu,,I cand ( mieis
PlIease send ime more in format ion on sitid. a broad oppor nities at The American University of Paris

CALLBACKS
Friday, October 2nd, 7 pm
CCRB Dance Room For

Unr ry AMs Center
'more information, Call UAC at 7631107

Name NIr/Ms.
:Mailng address

pleis prin in ink.

Cit

State

Zip-

Telephone.

Nameof oe Cge/nmiversits you currently attend
I may he interested in applying for entry in Fall 19 Spring 19 Summer 19
I a a: Freshman ii Sophomore Junior FSenior
My primary academic interest/program:
Please send to: United Stares Office, The American University of Paris
8)4East1xth Street, Suite 434 New York NY1001)3-600
Tel. 12121 677-4870 Fax. (212) 475-5205

I

I

You've worked hard... IN
Excelled academically... C A REERSes .
Achieved results...
Now it's time to trade up... OPTIONS

You've worked hard... CAREERS IN
Excelled academically...
Achieved results... 0OP IG N
Now it's time to trade up...

If you possess exceptional analytical talent...wantto use
sophisticated technology...and thrive on complex intel-
lectual challenges - you will achieve results with
SBC/oC.
Currently a joint venture between the O'Connor Partners
and Swiss Bank Corporation, we specialize in foreign
exchange, interest rates, and Japanese and European
equity derivative instruments. SBC/OC has announced
its intention tofully integrate intoSwiss BankCorporation's
Capital Markets and Treasury Business, which will result
in an innovative, client-focused organization poised for
global leadership across the full range of financial risk

TRADING
We provide renowned theoretical training coupled
with its practical application on an exchange floor
or risk managementtrading desk. We expect you to
express your ideas, collaboratively develop dy-
namic solutions, and assume responsibility for
committing capital and managing portfolio risk.
Career opportunities exist in major financial cen-
ters in North America, Europe and Asia.

TRADING

If you possess exceptional analytical talent...want to
use sophisticated technology...and thrive on complex
intellectual challenges -you will achieve results with
O'Connor & Associates.
We're a premier technology-based securities trading
and financial risk management firm specializing in
U.S. and Canadian equity & indexoptions, convertible
securities and other derivative instruments. O'Connor
& Associates will be integrated into a Swiss Bank
Corporation subsidiaryonce regulatory approvals have
been received.

We provide renowned theoretical training coupled
with its practical application on an exchange floor
or risk management trading desk. We expect you
to express your ideas, collaboratively develop
dynamic solutions, and assume responsibility for
committing capital and managing portfolio risk.
Career opportunities exist in major financial cen-
ters in North America and Europe.

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan