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September 10, 1992 - Image 25

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1992-09-10

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The Michigan Daily/New Student Edition-Perspectives -Thursday, September 10, 1992- Page 5

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New Fall Fashions
Presented by Some.
"Old-Time Favorites"

* Ruff-Hewn
s Corbin

ACT UP offers 20
reasons to promote
AlDS education

* Pendleton
* And More!

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A Trove
DOME
!! fVacc
E* Airlir
i Roil.
S -Cru
a- Cars

el Agency With Personalized
STIC & INTERNATIONAL TRi

otion m Business
lent Group
ne Tickets
Passes
ses Tours
els 609

by Pattrice Maurer
Twenty percent of people with
AIDS contracted HIV while in their
teens. While teens are the fastest-
growing group of people with HIV,
high schools rarely provide com-
plete AIDS prevention programs.
The 1980s saw tens of thousands
of gay men die of AIDS before the
government did anything. Media
hype about AIDS led to an increase
in gaybashing; assaults against gay
men and lesbians continue to top
bias crime lists.
Eighteen degrees of hype: for
years, media homophobia and
racism combined to demonize gay
men with AIDS while keeping
straight people of color with AIDS
invisible. The results? Many pre-
ventable deaths, many wasted years

of misplaced research, increased
risk for everyone.
AIDS activists have tried 17 dif-
ferent tactics to get the University
to attend to problems at the
University Medical Center.
Problems include inconsistent
treatment for AIDS patients, sub-
standard AIDS education for staff,
extreme homophobia among staff,
and the refusal to allow clinical
AIDS research at the hospital.
These failures are well documented
but no action has been taken to
correct them.
Sixteen groups who are poorly
served by current AIDS policies:
the homeless, people living in
poverty, prisoners, injection drug
users (IDUs), partners of IDUs,
See ACT UP, Page 6

Friendly Service,
AVEL

ieventh Avenue t

E. LIBERTY ANN ARBOR

LADIES' APPAREL
306 S. State Street
IL Ann Arbor, Mt 48104 Phone (313) 662-3340

WE DO
ALL FR
FOR U

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_____

Members of the AIDS Coalition To Unleash Power distribute condoms and
pamphlets on safer sex in an Ann Arbor park.

a ----- iadsenreaawwn smr

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Close to
the $
action
Ashley's is right in the
middle of it all - concerts at Hill, films, shopping,
everything the State Street entertainment area has
to offer.
Drop in for dinner before - we've got great food
(one of the best burgers around, and all kinds of
specials). And we're open late, too - drop in after
when the hour's late but the evening's still young.
And how about lunch? Try a sandwich and our
exclusive list of English Ales on draught.

SHAMAN DRUM BOOKSHOP
SPECIALIZING IN QUALITY TITLES IN THE HUMANITIES

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SHAMAN DRUM BOOKSHOP
313 SOUTH STATE STREET
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN 48104
[ELEPHONE (313) 662-7407

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Make Ashley's
your spot on State!
338 South State (at William)
Ann Arbor * 996-9191

t
t
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La Margque de Qualiti
Lingerie
Come visit the finest and most
unique Lingerie Shop in
Ann Arbor. 'e feature a wide
variety ofquatitygarmentsfor
alf ages and taste.

PHONE (313) 662-2914
HOURS. 9:30 AM - 5:30 PM
MONDAY - SATURDAY

'With this ad come in
and receive 10% off
your first purchase.

304 S. STATE
ANN ARBOR. MI 48104

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A Uniqu
Are you lookir
contempor
or ju
If so,i
Made In A
(Street L
769-4

ie Shopping Atmosphere!
rg for alternative cards, unusual gift items,
ary accents for your dorm or apartment
ist something new and different?
visit the stores at 222 State Plaza!
kmerica Surroundings
evel) -and- (Lower Level)
209 769-4208

gold bond
cleaners
Quality Dry Cleaning

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Students shouldget
involved in '92
presdnilcampaign
by Emily Fries
I worked at a camp this summer. Not a traditional go-hiking-and-make-
a-set-of-macrame-dishes camp, this was a camp for kids who are on the de-
bating teams at their high schools.
Geek camp. Bright kids from all over the country come to the University
for three weeks to learn how to debate and to use the University's huge
library.
One day, while discussing what arguments they wanted to work on with
my group of kids, I decided to take an informal poll. I asked them to write
down who they would vote for for President.
Remember, kids at debate camp tend to be a little smarter and slightly
better informed than normal high school kids. They have to read the news-
paper and be vaguely aware of the issues of the day in order to compete
effectively.
I was shocked by their responses.
Ten said they would vote for Bush. One said Clinton. Seven said Perot.
Well, those seven didn't really write down Perot.
One wrote Pierrot. One wrote Perrow. Parow. Perro. And so on.
Not one of them spelled his name correctly.
This bothered me enough that I brought it up at the faculty meeting that
night. We talked about how the kids have become much more conservative.
We talked about how although they all think recycling paper is important,
they also seem to be less informed than the camp kids used to be.
The only explanation we could come up with as to why none of them
could spell Ross Perot's name was that none of them had ever read his
name. They'd probably all heard about him on the evening news, or from
friends at school, or from older members of their families.
They'd never read his name.
Scary.
When I took a similar poll of my group in 1988, the majority of the
campers expressed a preference for Dukakis. Many of them said that the
reason they favored Dukakis wasn't so much because he was a great guy
with an awe-inspiring vision, but rather that the whole Iran-Contra-Ollie-
North fiasco left them untrustworthy of anyone having anything to do with
the Reagan administration.
They'd made an informed choice.
The kids this year were so different. One of them didn't even know how
to find a book in the library. That wouldn't be so weird if not for the fact
that kids who debate tend to spend all of their free hours in the library.
None of them could give a reason for voting for Perot beyond "he just
seems better."
So, as you come to this great institution of higher learning, think about
what's going on in the world and what you can do to change the things you
don't like.
Marnv rof n uwil he 'vting in vouir first electinsQever- Get informed

and Shirt

Service

332 Maynard St.

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