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September 21, 1992 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1992-09-21

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The Michigan Daily - Monday, September 21, 1992- Page 7

LGMPO sponsors welcome
tea for community members

by Karen Talaski
Daily Gender Issues Reporter
Addressing everything from
equal opportunity in housing to their
summer vacations, about 100 stu-
dents, staff and faculty rallied to-
gether at the Lesbian Gay-Male
Programs Office's (LGMPO's)
Welcoming Tea Friday.
"The tea is a good way to get the
community together, and get to
know one another," said first-year
MBA student Ron Genotti.
Founded in 1971, the LGMPO
offers counseling, referrals, educa-
tional out-reach, support and com-
munity consultation for the U-M and
Ann Arbor communities.
"This is the place I cane to four
years ago when I was in the process
of leaving a marriage and an addic-
tion. I didn't have any place to turn
so I started calling around," said
Debra, an Ann Arbor resident and
professor at a local college.
"I finally found this office and
they asked me 'why don't you come
down and we'll see if we can help
you,"' Debra said. "They saved my
life.
"There was no way for me to
conceptualize that this could be a

way of life and that it would be good
(until) I got involved here," Debra
continued. "I like to support (the
LGMPO) when there are things go-
ing on. I wish there had been some-
thing like this when I was young,
instead of me carrying it inside."
Natural Resources senior Rusty
Brach said he thought the tea was
important for new-comers to the U-
M community. "That way, when
they come back into the office and
they'll know who we are," Brach
said. "It's nice to connect with
people."
Many people attended the tea to
show their support for the organiza-
tion. Several students said they were
troubled by how the LGMPO will be
affected by the appointment of three
new deans to the Office of Students
Affairs, which governs the LGMPO.
"It's important to support the of-
fice in light of the university's am-
bivalent support," said Rackham
graduate student Julie Hastings.
Fellow graduate student Coralynn
Davis agreed that some areas of the
U-M have been antagonistic toward
the LGMPO, "especially the regents,
who have not been ambivalent in
their hostility."

LGMPO co-coordinator Billie
Edwards expressed her concern over
possible changes resulting from the
reorganization.
"There are different philosophies
as to what (the new deans') organi-
zational style is," Edwards said. "We
are in the beginning stages of the re-
organization in terms of how it all
will work ... and affect all of the
students."
Brook Stair, Educational
Outreach Programs coordinator for
the LGMPO, said she enjoyed the
tea because it gave her a chance to
mingle with people in the commu-
nity. "(Community members) can
see us and meet us and see what
we're all about," she said.
This year, the LGMPO plans to
add groups for gay male couples,
gay male authors and a group to talk
about relationships for gay and bi-
sexual males, said LGMPO co-
coordinator Jim'Toy.
Edwards' plans include a lesbian
and bisexual self-defense class to be
held again in October. Edwards is
also organizing a ropes challenge
course for women who are in the
"coming out" process.

Free for all
Students grab at the 300 U-M t-shirts thrown of the roof of Ulrich's Book Store Friday afternoon.

TEST
Continued from page 1
precedent for humanitarian flights."
Elsewhere, two people were re-
ported injured in a mortar attack on a
funeral ceremony for a dozen
Bosnian soldiers at Sarajevo's Lions
cemetery.
During the final prayer at the
Muslim service, a mortar shell
landed within 100 yards of the
mourners, who included about 400
of the dead soldiers' comrades. The
mourners remained crouched at the
gravesites until a second round
landed 20 yards away, sending them

fleeing to nearby buses and parked
cars. Two people were reported
wounded.
The fighting in and around
Sarajevo, which died down later in
the day, was part of a battle between
Bosnian loyalist forces and Serbs
hoping to use territorial gains to bol-
ster bargaining positions in Geneva.
At the United Nations Saturday,
the Security Council voted to rec-
ommend that Yugoslavia's voting
rights in the General Assembly be
suspended as punishment for insti-
gating the Bosnian civil war. The ac-

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CLASSIFIEDS

tion must be ratified by the General
Assembly.
Yugoslav Premier Milan Panic
yesterday claimed that in June, he
persuaded Western powers to call
off air strikes against targets in
Belgrade. The claims were made in a
televised address and he did not say
which Western governments were
involved or provide other details of
the alleged Western plan.
There have been no attacks on
Belgrade since fighting began in
Bosnia after the former republic de-
clared independence Feb. 29.
Quayle
admits .to
e .
avoiding
Vietna-m
WASHINGTON (AP) - Vice
President Dan Quayle acknowledged
yesterday that joining the National
Guard in 1969 sharply reduced his
risk of being sent to Vietnam.
But Quayle denied strings were
pulled on his behalf and renewed his
attack on Bill Clinton's explanation
of how he avoided the military.
Quayle, on NBC-TV's "Meet the
Press," said "a lot of factors" went
into his decision to join the Guard
upon graduating from DePauw
University in May 1969 and losing
his student deferment.
Pressed on whether his main mo-
tivation was to avoid being sent to
fight in Vietnam, Quayle said,
"When I looked at all the options, I
wanted to join the reserves."
Quayle added, "Of course you
have much, much less of a chance to
go to Vietnam" in the Guard.
"I never asked for any special
treatment," he said. "No rules were
broken, no regulations broken. There
were openings. Thousands of people
joined the Indiana National Guard in
the year 1969, just like I did."
The issue now, he said, "is the
truthfulness or the lack thereof of
Bill Clinton."

Historic Et
returns sat
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP)
- Endeavour sailed through a clear
sky and landed at Kennedy Space
Center yesterday with seven astro-
nauts and their animal brood, ending
the first shuttle flight devoted to
Japanese research.
"Congratulations on a highly
successful and historic mission,"
Mission Control's Ken Reightler
told the astronauts once they were
back on Earth.
The five-man, two-woman crew
made history simply because of who
they are: the first married couple in
space, first black woman in space
and first Japanese to fly on a U.S.
spaceship.
They achieved another space first
during the eight-day laboratory re-
search mission with the fertilization
and hatching of frog eggs. The re-
sulting tadpoles are the first crea-
tures, other than insects, to be con-
ceived and developed in weight-
lessness.
"This one will go down as an
outstanding mission: perfect liftoff,
perfect landing and all of the science
working," NASA scientist Thora
Halstead said after watching
Endeavour come home. "You
couldn't ask for anything better."
NASA's newest shuttle landed on
the concrete runway at Kennedy at
8:53 a.m. EDT. Just before nose

About 350 guests, many of them
Japanese, watched the landing from
bleachers near the runway.
NASA delayed Endeavour's re-
turn by 1 1/2 hours, or one orbit, be-
cause of the threat of rain in the area.
The rain stayed offshore.
Endeavour logged 3.3 million
miles during its journey, which be-
gan Sept. 12, and circled Earth 127
times. It was NASA's 50th shuttle

ideavour shuttle flight
el to Cape Kennedy
wheel touchdown, a red, white and be performed round the clock.
blue drag chute popped open and NASA added a day to the flight
slowed the spaceship as it rolled to a midway through the mission so the
stop. crew could conduct extra

experiments.
Although the mission featured
the first married couple in space -
astronauts Mark Lee and Jan Davis
- they worked opposite shifts in
orbit and saw little of one another.
Kennedy director Robert
Crippen, an ex-astronaut, said he ex-
pects more married couples traveling
together in space.

'This one will go down as an outstanding
mission: perfect liftoff, perfect landing and all
of the science working.'
-Thora Halstead,
NASA scientist

flight but only the second flight of
Endeavour.
Most of the animals were hustled
off the shuttle a few hours after
landing so scientists could examine
the specimens for any lingering
effects of weightlessness.
The astronauts split 12-hour
shifts during the mission so the ani-
mal, crystal, metal and glass-melt-
ing, and human medical tests could

For this flight, NASA made an
exception to its policy barring mar-
ried couples from flying together be-
cause Lee and Davis got married
long after being assigned to the
mission.
The crew also included Mae
Jemison, NASA's first and only fe-
male black astronaut, and Mamoru
Mohri, Japan's first professional
astronaut.

764-0552
"

HAVE EVER WANTED TO
BE PART OF A HUMOR MAG?
NAW,
STUPID,
THE GUY
BEHIND YA.
GEZ

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