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April 22, 1992 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1992-04-22

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Wednesday, April 22,1992

CITY
Continued from page 1
worker's compensation insurance;
and,
Up to $10,000 for an outside
auditing firm to examine RAA's past
finances - so the organization can

resume the necessary service to the
city.
"It was a low bid," recalls Mayor
Liz Brater. "It was predicated on
their being efficient, but apparently
they've run into some difficulties
that they didn't foresee."
City Administrator Alfred Gatta
said he has assigned Assistant

Administrator for Environmental
Services Robert Bauman "to come
up with a plan to keep Recycle Ann
Arbor in business for 30 or 40 days."
"Our short term solution is to
make early payments to Recycle
Ann Arbor," Gatta said. "We also
want to find out what their current
financial situation is."

. -

Calvin and Hobbes

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A BlG
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HAZING
Continued from page 1
programs.
Instead of a program focused
primarily on pledges, many fraterni-
ties have instituted a membership
education program, "so everyone is
always learning, even once he is a
member," he said.
The length of the pledge educa-
tion programs has been shortened in
many cases to four to six weeks.
"With a reduced amount of time
there is less opportunity to add inap-
propriate programming," Brant
added.
Brant said some fraternities have
eliminated the pledge program alto-
gether and thus the period between
the time the bid is accepted and ini-
tiation.
"Six to 12 fraternities have
moved in that direction and reports
have come in with increased mem-
bership and no hazing incidents ...
But it's not clear whether non-pledg-
ing is the answer," he said.
Tau Kappa Epsilon (TKE) Pledge
Educator Jonathan Finkelstein said
his fraternity has eliminated the
pledge program.

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He said, "Last year, nationals;
passed a bylaw that said initiationi
must be within two weeks of receiv-
ing a bid" - at which time one en-1
ters the New Membership;
Development Program, where time
is spent learning about the chapter's;
history and the actives.
Finkelstein said the change was
brought about because of "many
All of the 62 national,
social fraternities
belonging to the NIC
have ... policies that
condemn hazing.
problems throughout the country.
Nationals wanted to make something
a little safer and a little more posi-
tive."
The local TKE chapter adopted
the new program before it was
passed nationally. "It eliminated a
lot of problems people see within the
system - sexist problems and alco-
hol problems," Finkelstein said.
Although hazing incidents fre
more commonly connected with
fraternity pledging, Alpha Delta Pi
SMITH
Continued from page 1
Prospective regental candidates
are first nominated at each political
party's state conventions and then
elected by the Michigan populace.
Smith said she was running to
serve on the board again because she
still has goals she wants to accom-
plish, including seeing that students
are granted more access to making
decisions.
"I hope to get the students more
power to participate in decision-
making processes, especially in de-
cisions which affect them," she said._
The University has improved
steadily since her graduation in
1948, Smith said, commenting she
believes facilities and services have
improved.
But she noted that she only had to
pay $60 a semester for tuition when
she attended school here.
And she added that the insur-
gence of teaching assistants (TAs)
may have adversely affected the
quality of undergraduate education.
"I think the students are some-
times shortchanged by not having
professors early on at the University.i
I think our quality of teaching was'
better," Smith said. "Many TAs are1
probably good, but there is a lot
more to be said about a professor
teaching you who has written the
book."
Smith said she believes her
strong commitment to students stems
from the fact she, her husband, and
her six children attended this school,
with her family garnering 12
University degrees.
One issue she said she feels stu-
dents should have had more input on
is deputization.
"I just feel that students should
be listened to and nobody else wants
to listen to them, so it appears," she
said. "It was difficult to vote on an
issue like that. That's one of the
hardest things about being a regent
- following your convictions. It
takes a lot of courage to do that.
"You have so many different

constituents. You have to weigh all
these forces in the end, but ulti-

national sorority has recently abol-
ished its pledge program.
National Alpha Delta Pi
President Beth Mannle said hazing,
although not a major problem with
the sorority, has been curtailed under
the new program in which pre-initi-
ated members enjoy the same privi-
leges and responsibilities as actives.
Mannle said there have been haz-
ing incidents in which women were
blindfolded or sent on scavenger
hunts, while McKaig mentioned
such acts as branding pledges with
their sorority letters, telling them to
shoplift, and having them wear silly
clothes.
Jim Gibson, director of student
activities at Indiana University, said
the pledge program modification "is
a very good step," though he said the
problem "still goes back to an issue
of mentality, not who's an active and
who's a pledge."
Gibson said most incidents have
involved paddling, excessive con--
sumption of alcohol leading to hos-
pitalization, and severe cases of hu-
miliation and degradation. I
"We are just starting to uncover"
many deep-seated traditions," he
added.
mately the decision is yours," she
said.

Shirley Clarkson, director of
presidential communications, con-
curred that Smith is conscientious in
considering students' perspectives.
"She's certainly shown a greatt
deal of concern for students," she
said.
Smith has been a minority dis-;
senter on the board another time, as
one of only two regents to vote
against a University anti-harassment
policy established in the late '80s.
However, Smith's opinion was
ultimately validated because the pol--
icy was later overturned by a federal
court on the grounds that it violated
free speech rights.
"I don't think it's the
University's place to restrict free
speech. I don't think the University
can infringe on any part of the
Constitution. That's unacceptable,"
she said. "I think students should
have the same rights as other citizens
in free speech. I just hope we don't
make the same mistake again."
Spurring the University to get
more investment managers and help-.
ing to solve a dilemma during the.
search for an athletic director have,
been the highlights of Smith's
tenure.
Smith said her suggestions have
helped improve overall University
performance.
Akin to postal carriers, neither
rain, nor sleet, nor snow keeps Smith
away from regents' meetings. She
described a February meeting a cou-,
ple of years ago when it was snow-.
ing so hard that she left early in or-
der to arrive on time.
"This whole state was a sheet of
ice. I left early because I knew I
would be crawling to Ann Arbor,"
she said.
On the way to the meeting,
Smith's car spun and landed in-a
ditch. After a truck helped her get
out, she continued her journey to
Ann Arbor - only to find the
meeting was canceled.
Smith bragged, "So I always say
that I have the best record of atten-
dance - I even went to a meeting
that wasn't held."

s

be Rittgan 'Cig
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