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April 21, 1992 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1992-04-21

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The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, April 21, 1992- Page 9

THE
UNIVERSITY
CLUB
COMMENCEMENT
BRUNCH 1992
Saturday, May 2
9am to 4pm
763-4648
Reservations taken
Mon. - Fri., 8:30am - 4:30pm
Muffins
Breakfast Pastries
Bagels with Lox
Fresh Fruit Platters
Herbed Scrambled Eggs
Potato Pancakes with
Applesauce
Broccoli Mushroom Cheddar
Quiche
Caesar Salad
Broccoli Bacon Salad
Tomatoes & Feta with Orzo
Fresh Asparagus
Rice Pilaf
Stir-Fried Vegetables
Fettucini Alfredo
Honey Mustard Chic,:;:
Spinach Lasagna
Shrimp & Scallop Newberg
Carved Roast Beef Au Jus
French Bread
Beverage
Delicious Dessert Buffet
Adults, $12.95
Children, $5.95
THE UNIVERSITY CLUB
in the Michigan Union
530 SOUTH STATE STREET
tom,

Q
0

Dancing
to their
own beat
by Alexandra Beller
W hat type of dance concert do
you get when there is no one j udg-
ing content, no guiding theme, no
prize at the end, and no restriction
on who choreographs, performs,
or designs?
You get an offbeat, eclectic
and contemporary show with a
medley of different styles, forms,
ideas and flavors. The Young Cho-
reographers Concert, based on the
above principles, will, no doubt,
be stamped with many different
artists' signatures.
The Young Choreographers
Concert fills many of the gaps that
remain between faculty-choreo-
graphed, audition-only concerts
like the American Masterworks,
and the many student chore-
ographed concerts such as the re-
cent No Fat Added. For those who
have not had many chances to be
on stage, this concert provides an
opportunity.
Dancers who want to perform
in the more familiar style of their
own choreography can have their
wish in this forum - a low-pres-
sure setting in which students may
"try out" old or new repertory.
The concert will be a mixture

Pirates makes a swingin'
journey into the 1920s
The Pirates of Penzance, choice went a bit too far was in the ing his first entrance with a life pre-
dir. Eric Gibson first act, when it seemed that every server around his neck) won the
Mendelssohn Theater musical number had a Charleston; crowd over.
April 17, 1992 the sequence including "Climbing Comic Relief came in the form of

Clayborn
of varying styles, techniques and
themes. Although most of the ten
artists who have submitted work
are in the Dance Department, the
avenues by which they are choos-
ing to express themselves are
vastly different.
From Wendy Light's violent
and passionate "Nightfall," based
loosely on the myths of the bac-
chantes, to Kevin Clayborn's
"Anima," about the stereotypes
that exist in gender relations, the
program promises to be diverse,
expansive and surprising.
THE YOUNG CHOREOGRA-
PHERS CONCERT will play
Thursday, at 8 p.m. in Studio A of
the Dance Building Admission is
free. Call 763-5460 for more in-
formation.

The program of the University's
Gilbert and Sullivan Society produc-
tion of The Pirates of Penzance
began with a director's note that
read: "However well-loved, repe-
tition of the Gilbert and Sullivan
standards without variety can stifle
creativity. The actors and designers,
as well as the audience members,
need to be challenged. New
approaches foster creativity. Some
V. , man S 4e
new ideas work, some fall short, but
without the freedom to try we will
stagnate ... With this in mind, our
production of The Pirates of
Penzance takes place in the year
1925."
Now if you're like me, you look
at this note with respect for the di-
rector's views - but also with a de-
gree of skepticism. Many people
resist to change, especially when
tradition is involved. In this case,
however, the change didn't really
affect the play that much, and, most
importantly, it didn't detract from
the enjoyment of it. Since this is so,
I couldn't find fault with the
decision to set it in the '20s.
The only instance in which the

Over Rocky Mountain" was the best
example of Charleston overkill. The
dance and changed time setting
seemed to hit the audience over the
head repeatedly.
The choreography by Susan Fili-
piak was appropriate and fun to
watch. Perhaps the strongest part of
the production, as far as choreog-.
raphy is concerned, came with the
song "When the Foeman Bares His
Steel"; the integration of a large part
of the cast was well-planned and ef-
fective.
The actors' singing was outstand-
ing. The principal parts - Frederic
(Robert Mirshak) and Mabel (Lisa
Romero) - were very strong in
their roles. Romero's vibrato was so
emphasized it seemed often to poke
fun at the operatic form itself.
Perhaps most notable, though in
a small part, was Kevin Casey as the
Chief of Police; his deep bass lin-
gered in your mind long after the
show ended.
The acting was also fine - a bit
exaggerated at times, but Gilbert and
Sullivan productions seem to have
been created for the ham in all of us.
Major-General Stanley (Bev Pooley)
was the audience favorite. His ges-
tures and expressions (besides mak-

the bungling police force. Filipiak's
choreography definitely helped to
deliver highly comedic results in
their sequences.
Pirates was simply a good time.
The only aspect of the play that was
noticeably affected by the changed
time setting was the costuming. The
'Climbing Over Rocky
Mountain' was the
best example of
Charleston overkill.
The dance seemed to
hit the audience over
the head repeatedly.
'20s garb was stylish and sometimes
laughable, but it didn't distract the
audience's attention from the story
itself.
Gibson not only maintained the
play's comedy, but emphasized it.
For this reason, you needn't look
scornfully upon a new adaptation of
a traditional work in the future; if
nothing else, Pirates proved that you
can make some changes in a script
without detracting from its original
content - or intent.
- Jenny McKee

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