100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 21, 1992 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1992-04-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Tuesday, April 21, 1992

NIELSEN
Continued from page 1
electing regents. A prospective
candidate must be nominated by one
political party at the state convention
and then popularly elected by the
citizens of Michigan.
Nielsen said this system causes
the regents to feel confused about
who they are responsible to when
making decisions.
"I feel my main responsibility is
to the citizens of Michigan," he said.
"The students that are here now are
not the same people who were here
when I started eight years ago. If the
students are the constituency, the
constituency keeps changing."
Nielsen added that he does
consider student concerns carefully
when making decisions.
The Michigan Student Assembly
recently formed a committee to
investigate the possibility of having
a student regent. Nielsen said he

thinks a student could be a regent if
the person is willing to make the
effort necessary to gain the support
of the political system.
"It's a serious commitment that
they would have to make," he said.
"It would be difficult for them to be
elected to the board more than once,
and they would have trouble with
relocation after graduation."
He said it would be impossible to
appoint a student as a ninth member
of the board.
"They would have to make a
ballot issue to be approved by the
entire state of Michigan in order for
that to be possible," he said.
Nielsen added that a regent's job
is more difficult than many people
think.
"There are many different facets
of this job - the monthly meetings,
meeting with faculty and governance
board, meeting with students as
problems develop," he said. "Fund-
raising and community events are

happening all of the time. I think that
it is desirable to have a regental
presence at all of these events."
Kennedy said he thinks Nielsen
does a good job of fulfilling all of
'The eight-year
regental term is an
advantage, but one
term is not enough
time. By the time you
really understand how
to make things
happen, you are one-
third through the

term.'

-Neal Nielsen

University regent
the responsibilities associated with
the job.
"Neal has been a conscientious
regent," he said. "I think he does his
homework really well and I think he
does a good job. I think he cares

about the students and making the
University the best that it can be."
Although Kennedy would not
speculate on Nielsen's chance of
reelection, he said he's "not
surprised that he is running again."
He added that since regents do
not have much name recognition
among voters, their elections tend to
be unpredictable.
"Conventional wisdom would
suggest that regental elections are
decided more by who is running at
the top of the party ticket than by the
individual regent," he said. "I'm sure
that some of them do develop a
constituency, though."
Nielsen said he thinks that
regents are elected for many
different reasons.
"I think it's a combination of fac-
tors," he said. "One is on the coat-
tails of whoever is on top of the
ticket, but I think that some people
- especially University alumni and
people who have children going to
school here, and the students who do
vote - look at how the person has
voted in the past. The hardcore party
loyalists probably vote by a straight
ticket. Name recognition probably
plays a part."
He added that how a regent gets
elected is less important than what
the person does while in office.
"I think different people have
different outlooks on life," he said.
"I would like to hope that everyone
puts their community concerns at the
front of what they do."
Nielsen said he wants to remain
on the board to make the University
a better place for when the children
of the next century - including his
own, now ages 10, 12 and 14 - at-
tend the institution.
"I had a very great experience at
the University and I want an
opportunity to reinvest in the
community," he said.

James Bonds Rob Lowes

Calvin and Hobbes

M4~BE. TDOMS "OPOSI1TESE
WOK0 COME MMSJST\ Lt"
TRUE . IW E I PON\f EE4 !
M(4N A LUCKY
vMFROV .~E !

I 9oNAT BELIEE MUCMS
IN ASTR.OLOGY SMOO0CHES!
Al NORV YOWV W A!
(ERN, TNAMTS

&roP IT! WNN THE~
YESETERPM §S 'EDQ ING ?a
PREDICTION £SHOULD I
TRUE, 5o I'M SPATSE2
SUJRE ToOM' S
I'M NOT .
WoRIi>

by Bill Watterson
IN- A. MNUTE7 TRY ITVOVE
N O'J'L BE I3Qi! V4_X
WEARIN1G A.SEE NOM! "(W0'
SBODY CA'ST! KISS G P\S
W#4ITH4 A.FAT
i oO
R X11!

NAMES
Continued from page 1
Few students said they were fans+
of the celebrities who shared their;
names.
"I've seen a few movies, but I'm;
not a real fan. I mostly like the ones
with Sean Connery," Bond said. l
"I've seen most of his movies al-+
though I wouldn't say I'm a fan of
his," Lowe said. "I can probably act
as good as he does."
"I think she's beautiful and a
good actress, but I haven't seen
many of her movies," Pfeiffer said.
However, some of the students
said there is also a down side to car-
rying a famous person's name. 1
Pfeiffer said she thinks her name
AFGHANISTAN
Continued from page 1
passage from Afghanistan.
Sevan urged the rebels to put
aside their "personal and political
ambitions" and work out a peaceful
transition to a new government.
"We are almost there. Don't risk
destroying the chance for peace,"
said Sevan, who appeared in public
for the first time .since Najibullah
gave up power Thursday.
Nervousness has steadily in-
creased in Kabul as the guerrillas,
known as mujahedeen or Islamic

once affected her grade.
"I once had a class and the TA
said 'We checked your exam spe-
cially.' I did bad on that exam. That
got me really upset," Pfeiffer said.
"When I went to the professor, she
gave me 20 more points."
Lowe said since he is not thel
kind of person who likes to be the
center of attention, he gets sick of
the constant comments.
"I wish I had a different name. It
gets to be overbearing, people mak-
ing obscene stupid cracks and not
taking you seriously," Lowe said.
However, Miller said he thinks
it could be worse.
"I like the name Arthur Miller,"
he said, "at least compared to
anyone bad like Charles Manson."
holy warriors, have tightened their
noose around the capital and seized
several provincial towns in the fouF
days since Najibullah's ousting.
Some shops are staying closed or
are opening for only a few hours
Tanks rumbled through rain-fille.
streets before dawn Monday an.
sporadic gunfire crackled in outlying
areas all through the day.
A powerful guerrilla alliance led
by Ahmed Shah Masood, a Jamiat-e-
Islami commander, wants to name i
mujahedeen government to bridg
the next six to 12 months until elec-
tions could be held.

O N ! * NOT ANOTHEK OH YEAH,>
0HN .E AT ID MUCH RATHER E
THE MALL! 7AA Upo TA
THE BURGER PIEA' E LJV:.
* N"C KET..
* 1>
. S.
.::: .:.. :
* >
The pogrnmtat uts dirougli i ed tape and
allows you to u'ork in:
Britain Germany Costa Rica
Ireland New Zealand Canada
France Jamaica
Open to allnmajors with anm ( ( Graduating
seniors, too!
b Contact.' Formore information and a free brochure.
Council Travel contact Council on International
F 1220 S. University Drive, #208 Educational Exchange
Ann Arbor, MI 48104 205 East 42nd St., New York, NY 10017
(313) 998-0200 ~Tel. (212) 661-1414
SALE1
"SAVE NOW ON ALMOST ANYTHING FOR
GRADUATION" SALE
d

daily *
(daV10) n.
1) News 2) Opinion
3) Arts 4) Sports
5) Cassified6) Crossword
7) Comics 8) 5 days a
week 9) aft over campus

BOLLINGER
Continued from page 1
political thought and "the idea of
academic freedom is a way of life,"
he said.
Academic freedom is a vital part
of education that cannot be con-
demmed in an attempt to stop intol-
erance, he said. "The heart of aca-
demic freedom ... is the spirit with
which we approach life," he said.
Professor Chandler Davis, one
of the three professors suspended in

Save the LP!
DAILY ARTS

1954, said the Academic and
Intellectual Freedom speeches keep
people aware of society's intoler-
ance.
Davis said Bollinger presented
the issues well in yesterday's
speech. "I don't know if people will
pay attention to it, but if they do,
they'll be rewarded," he said.
Davis, who lost his
professorship at the University
because he did not disclose his
political beliefs to the
Congressional Committee of Un-
CONGRESS
Continued from page 1
Vander Jagt. They said they would
try to draft state Sen. William Van
Regenmorter of Jenison to challenge
Vander Jagt.
The moves came as Michigan
continues to readjust its political fu-
ture following the reapportionment
of congressional and state legislative
boundaries and politicians continue

American Activities, said he no
longer sees an "immediate threat"
of faculty members losing their
jobs.
Although McCarthyism is not
nearly the threat it once was, the
problem has not been solved, he
said.
"It has never been reversed,"
Davis said, referring the the ,
University's decision in 1954 to
suspend himself and Professors
Clement Market and Mark
Nickerson.
to evaluate the fallout of the House
banking scandal and widespread
voter discontent with incumbents.
Another state lawmaker, Se,.
Nick Smith (R-Addison) has alread,
announced running in the 7th
District race. Also running for the
GOP nomination are Stan
Grundeman, a Concord School
Board member and former Jackson
County commissioner, and Thomas
Wilson of Jackson, an attorney anti
Jackson County commissioner.

Amazin' Blue- A co-ed a capella
singing ensemble
Comedy Company - A student-
directed and written comedy troupe
that performs once a term and has
travelled to other Big 10 schools.
T raditio ns ~ s n a u v r ,
Homecoming - As official University
coordinators of Homecoming, UAC
plans the parade, float contest, pep
rally, and many other campus-wide
actrvitres.
Michigras- Brings the estive
atmosphere of Mardi Gras to U of M
North Campus
College Bowl- A compeitve quiz
trivia contest, beginning with an
intramural tournament whose
champions travel to contest during
the winter term.
Min-Courses - Each term, over
30 noncredit course are offered.
ranging from aerobic dance to sign
language.
Organization
Tech Crew - Supplies and
monitors the necessary sound and
lighting equipment for all the
events UAC sponsors

Committee Chair
applications are
available at UAC,
2105 Mich Union.
For more information call 763-1107.

DEGREES
Continued from page 1
laws degree. Wolf, who currently
works as a Distinguished Professor
at the Herbert H. Lehman College
and Graduate Center, City
University of New York, has written
about Mexico's anthropological
history.
In other graduation ceremonies,
ABC News anchor and 1962
University graduate Carole Simpson

will speak in front of more than
3,000 LSA graduates and their.
Candidates were
selected after
extensive review and
given final approval by
the University Board of
Regents.
guests at the LSA graduation cere-
mony, which will also be held May
2, at noon in the Michigan Stadium.

10% off on these
Waterman Pens
Mont Blanc Pens
Parkers: 95 Series
75 Series
Place Vendome Series
Classic Series
Insignia Series

e items
Cross Pens
Pelikan: 200 Series
400 Series
Free
Engraving
for
Parker
Pens

i

The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter terms by
students at the University of Michigan. On-campus subscriptions for spring/summer term are available for $9.
No off-campus subscribtions are available for spring/summer. Subscriptions for fall/winter terms, starting in
September via U.S. mail are $155. Fall term only is $85. Winter term (January through April) is $90. On-campus
subscriptions for fall/winter are $35. Subscriptions must be prepaid.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and the Associated Collegiate Press.
ADDRESS: The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1327.
PHONE NUMBERS (All area code 313): News 764-0552; Opinion 747-2814; Arts 763-0379;'Sports 747-3336;
Circulation 764-0558; Classified advertising 764-0557; Display advertising 764-0554; Billing 764-0550.

Selected Batteries 50% off
Duracell Batteriess
Audio & Video Accessories
(including cassettes and video tapes)
Calculators a Whopping 10% off
(selected calculators)
Hewlett Packard 95LX Hewlett Packard 48SX
w.$&9 5 NOW $503.95 w $26283 NOW $227.60
Hewlett Packard 275 Hewlet Pa kard 12C
yas..$9S NOW $53.90 .89 NOW $62.90

J

S4

,-- - - -- - - - -

.........................
..........................

NEWS Henry Goldblatt, Managing Editor
EDITORS: David Rhengold, Bethany Robertson, Stefanie Wines, Ken Walker LIST EDITOR: David Shepardson
STAFF: Laura Addely, Lan Barager, Hope Calad, Barry Cohen, Ben Dec. Lauren Dormer, Ern Einhom, Renie Hucile, LoretaLI".
Andrew levy, Robin Utwin. Nicole Malenfant, Sarah McCarthy, Travis McReynolds, Josh Mockder. Sheley Morrison, Melissa
Peerless, Karen Pier, Mona Qureshi, Karen Sabgir, Christopher Scherer, Gwen Shaffer, Purvi Shah, Jennifer Silverberg, Alan Susser,
Karen Talask.i, David Wartowsld, Chastity Wilson.
OPINION Yael Citro, Geoffrey Earle, Amitava Mazumdar, Editors
STAFF: Jenny Aix, Renee Bushey, Daren Hubbard, David Leitner, Dave Rowe, David Shepardson.
SPORTS John Miyo, Managing Editor
EDITORS: Josh Dubow, Ryvan Herrington, Albert Lin, JeffWigims4
STAFF: Meg Beeon, Andy DeKortes, Kimberly DeSempetoere, Matthew Dodge, Shawn DuFreane, Jeni Duret, Brett Forret, Jim Food.
ike Hitl, Bruce Inosenco. Dan Linna, Rod Loewenthal, Sharon Lundy, Adam Miter, Rich Mitvalsky, Beadette Ramsay, Mike
Ranciio, Tim Rardin, Greg Richardson, Chad Salran, Todd Schoenhaus, Jett Sheran. Tim Spolar, Andy Stabile, Ken Sugiura, Benech
Taylor.
ARTS Elizabeth Lenhard, Michael John Wilson, Editors
EDITORS: Mark Bneil(Fikn), Diane Fdeden (Rne A Performing Arts), Alan J. Hogg, Jr. (Books), Auis Komnom (Weekend etc.).
Annestte Perruso (Music).
STAFF: Carina Bacon. Greg Baise, Margo Baumgart, Skot Beal, Melissa Rose Bemnardo, Jen Bilk, Andrew J. Cahn,, Jonathan Chalt
Richard S. Davis. Gabriel Feberg, Rosanne Freed, Forrest Green I11, Jessie Holladay, Aaron Hamburger. Stephen Henderson,
Jonathan Higns, Nina Hodas , Roger Has, Mane Jacobson. Andrea Kachudae, Kristen Knudsen, Rona Kobel, Che Lepley, Dary
Lockman, Jenny McKee, Kristen McMurphy, Amy Meng, John Morgan.,fMichelle Philip, Dan Poux, Austin Ratner. Joff Rosenerrg,
Valerie Shuman ChisineaSlovey' Scott Ste'ling, Alissa Strauss, Carie Walco, Michele Weger, Sarah"We"dman" Josh Worth.
PHOTO Kristoffer Gillette, Kenneth J. Smoller, Editors
STAFF: Anthony M. Cron, Michelle Guy, Doug Kanter, Heather Lowman, Sharon Musher, Suzie Paley, Molly Stevens, Padl Taylor.

Hewlett Packard 19BI
Hewlett Packard 28S
Hewlett Packard 21S
Hewlett Packard 42S
Texas Instrument-68
Texas Instrument-81
Sharp EL-6170
Casio 7000G

Save $5 on
I .89
w .78
w .7
w .95
w305.$9'5$

NOW$122.89
NOW $164.89
NOW $32.89
NOW $82.89
NOW $41.75
NOW $86.95
NOW $34.95
NOW $68.89

t

DISPLAY SALES Shannon Burke, Manag
ASSISTANT MANAGER Laurel M llrnsxa,

ae

I i

ii

1 ~w 1.0e, U t - . . lo T/11 - . '

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan