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April 17, 1992 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 1992-04-17

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Page 10-The Michigan Daily- Friday, April 17,1992

Rollins Band
The End of Silence
Imago
Henry Rollins can belt out the lyrics like no other vocalist. This former
Black Flag frontman's gravely voice immediately catches your attention and
doesn't let go for the full 73 minutes of the Rollins Band's new album, The
End of Silence.
This is the first release by the band on the Imago label, and Rollins says
of the album in one of his zillion bios that "there's none of that cussin' stuff
on there but, without a doubt this record will fuck your shit up, but in a good
way." I definitely agree.
The End of the Silence is straight-ahead, blood-pumping, in-your-face
music. The first track, "Low Self Opinion," defines the tone for the rest of
the album. It's full of Rollins' self-hating lyrics that just about rip him apart.
Rollins seems to take a long time to cut himself down. Each song on the
album is quite lengthy. The shortest track is a little under five minutes and
the longest cut, "Blues Jam," is almost twelve minutes in length. "Blues
Jam," however, is not typical of the medium from which it gets its name. It
Is a heavy and powerful session filled with great performances by all the
band members.
Several of the songs on this album can be found on an earlier release by
the Rollins Band. "Tearing," "You Didn't Need," and "What Do You Do,"
Ore all originally recorded live from a 1989 concert in Vienna, Austria, on a
disc called Turned On from 1/4 Stick Records.
Even though these songs on the new album are great tracks, they can't
compare to the live versions. The studio tracks can't match the incredible
imount of energy that Rollins puts into his live performances. So just be-
pause Rollins does a few songs better on another album doesn't take away
from the brilliance of The End of the Silence.
The Rollins Band plays tonight at 7 p.m. with Slot at St. Andrew's Hall.
The show is sold out. Call 961-MELT.
-Alan Segal

AMERICA
Continued from page 9
rhythms and our national anthem.
This is a show that does not use
flashy props or high tech effects, but
lets the material speak for itself.
Most of the questions about the na-
ture of America are not answered by

the performers, but they give the
viewer something to think about.
Nothing new is overturned, how-
ever; chances are, your views on
Tom Monaghan, for example, are
not going to change. But the
sketches are fun. And if nothing else
you can watch the Statue of Liberty
dance.
America, America will be playing

through April 26 at the Performance
Network. Shows are Thursdays and
Saturdays at 8 p.m., Fridays at 9
p.m. and Sundays at 6:30 p.m. (with
no show on Easter). Tickets are $9
general admission and $7 students
and seniors. For more information
call 663-0681.
-Jessie Halladay

a r v

UBU
Continued from page 8
ment. Jarry studied Aristotle, who
believed that theater should teach
and entertain. Shakespeare, Chek-
hov, all the greats understood this.
Theater should do both at the same
time.

"This kind of theater raises ques-
tions we need to ask. It will lead us
down the path, but it's hard to get
people to ask these questions. Too
often in dramatic arts we are bom-
barded with the formalized story.
We know what's going to happen -
we all knew what was going to hap-
pen in Top Gun, didn't we?"

Point well taken.
UBU ROI (KING UBU) will be
presented by the RC Players Acting
Ensemble in the Residential College
Auditorium, East Quad. On April 23,
and 24 the show will begin at 11
p.m.; this Saturday and April 26 at 8
p.m. Tickets are $5, $3 with student
ID. For more information call 998-
0655.

OVERSEAS
Continued from page 9
French masters. In the final. story,
Rouan manifests the full scope of the
French colonials' domination of the
people and the fierce Arab resistance
that results. At the same time, Rouan
also portrays how the atmosphere in
Algeria changes from an idyllic ex-
otic paradise to a violent armed
camp.
Though the political agenda may
be predictably P.C., it never overt
whelms the stories of Zon, Malner
and Gritte, which lie at the heart of
the movie. Rouan skillfully and
gradually strips away layers of each
woman's character, constantly sub-
verting the audience's expectations.
In the end, the movie has shown the
best and the worst in the women
who come across as alternately car-
ing, willful, cruel, and ultimately
human.
The memorable photography and
music in the film have a fragile
beauty which evokes a time and
place that is long gone. Though the
plot is often quite obvious and the
foreshadowing is at times unbea-
ably heavyhanded, overall, Overseas
is a spectacular directorial debut.

VERONIQUE
Continued from page 8

by the odd feeling that she is not
alone, but in the end, she is devas-
tated when she learns of Veronika's
existence. Somehow, the fact that
she is not unique detracts from her
own identity.
Veronique has the magical, deli-
cate feel of a fairy tale. To a large
extent, this aura is due to the per-
formance of Jacob (Au Revoir Les
Enfants), who radiates the freshness

and joy of being young, beautiful
and talented in scenes like the one at
The best way to
classify the movie is as
a fairy tale about the
meaning of life for
adults.
the very beginning of the film, when
she exuberantly sings the recurring
musical theme in the midst of a
downpour.

Lit by the yellow, otherworldly
lighting of cinematographer Sla-
womir Idziak, Jacob has an angelic
presence that suggests the world of
the supernatural.
The best way to classify the mo-
vie is as a fairy tale about the mea-
ning of life for adults, which makes
Hollywood fantasies like Hook and
Beauty and the Beast seem mundane
by comparison.
THE DOUBLE LIFE OF VERO-
NIQUE is playing at the Michigan
Theater.

OVERSEAS is playing
Arbor 1 & 2.

at the Ann

GUMBY'S LOVES TO GO TO PARTIES!

CHOOSE FROM:
PEPPERONI
SAUSAGE
BACON
GROUND BEEF
TOMATOES
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ONIONS
MUSIROOMS
BLACK OLIVES
BANANA PEPPERS
PINEAPPLE

ASK ABOUT OUR PARTY SPECIALS
PIZZA
FAST FREE DELIVERY (LIMNED DELIVERY AREA),
OR 10 MINUTE CARRY OUT GUARANTEE
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Attention Subscribers!
Subscription info for 1992-1993
FALL SUMMER
U.S. Mail Delivery: Spring-Summer $9
Fall-Winter $155 campus only
Fall Only $85 no U.S. mail delivery
Campus Delivery: $35
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4

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but it can help you find more time or bo.

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life real life.
It's a complete and affordable Macintosh
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In addition to its built-in capabilities, the
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If you already own a Macintosh Classic,
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To put more time on your side, consider
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See us for a demonstration today,
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0

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0

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